The B2B Revenue Executive Experience
The B2B Revenue Executive Experience

Episode · 3 years ago

Scott Santucci on How Sales Enablement Can Turn Your Sales Org Upside Down

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Throw away your 57-step sales guidebook and keep it simple, stupid.

In the most recent episode of the podcast, Chad sits down to talk to Scott Santucci, Director of The Alexander Group and founder of The Sales Enablement Society.

Scott sees countless inefficiencies in many sales orgs today, but he has developed a method of simplifying the whole approach through Sales Enablement.  This interview explores what the term “Sales Enablement” means, how to keep the sales process simple, how to implement these practical tips, and how the Sales Enablement Society came to be.

Find a breakdown of this episode here.

You're listening to the BTB revenueexecutive experience, a podcast dedicated to help inh executives, traintheir sales and marketing teams to optimized growth, whether you'relooking for techniques and strategies wore tools and resources, you'v come tothe right place. Let's accelerate your growth in three two one: welcome everyone to the B to be revenue executive experience, I'm your host, ShadSanderson! Today we're going to be talking about sales enablement to helpus do that. We have with US Sko Santucci, director of the AlexanderGroup and founder the sales, an ablement society, Scott. Thank you verymuch for taking the time and welcome to the show. Thank you, Chad, and I thinkeverybody should know how much prep work you put Tean anour set. We werejust talking about that and it's kind of amazing how much work youdo to make this. So I'm sure that all of your listeners appreciate that it'sfantastic actually. Well, I hope it was a good experience for you as well. Imean that's what it's all about is making sure that the guests come in alittle bit more forewarned and we can have a good time doing this andeverybody knows kind of what to expect right. It's expectation alignment, yes,so we start the show with a typical off topic. Question would love to knowabout a defining moment in your career that you go back to over and over againtake lessons away from kind of. What was that and what lessons did you learn?So I'M gonna ask for two, because ther are yen and Yang Othisin thi sort oflike a thing that I'm learning here is that there's two sides to each coin andthe more we look at those the more we can navigate, but I think there'sthere's two events. One event was when I was a top selling rep way back whenin maybe one thousand nine hundred and ninety one thousand nine hundred anninety nine, and I was the number one rep and I decidedthat I was dissatisfied with our Marketing Department for variety of variety of reasons, and I was much muchyounger, so Chad and I talked earlier you and I talked earlier about beingjenaxers hardcore chip on my shoulder, Jenetorand decided to throw my weight around of being a top Rep and to voice my concerns about about marketing why it doesn't really matter. But Ibuilt a relationship with our CFO. I D mentioned that our CFO lean forward. Hesaid Scott, I think you're on to something. I've always felt that about fifty percent of the money thatwe're spending here is worthless and I think you can help me prove it so eGahaha glad- and you know we wipe, boarded out somemetrics and measures, and you know I went away and then I got called back aweek later to fly up to our headquarters, where I was asked topresent to the executive committee. That's the first time a sales personpresented to the executive committee- and I talked about you- know what thosewhat those findings were was asked to leave the room and thirty minutes laterI had a new position. My position was they made me the VPOFproduct, marketing and management, which you know really was a precursor to ashells an awent roll, and I had a lot of support from the CFO. I had him do alot of the metrics and we ere really successful en transforming our sales.For so we improved our average deal size by fifty six percent. We cut oursale cycle time down by thirty three percent. We improved our win rates bytwenty five percent, and we had finance measure at all is like really reallysuccessful, but there was a lot of pain and all of that and hopefully canimagine I was not, as I wasn't a touchy friendly. I lose love by the SalesOrganization, taking that so much els. So I had all these. You know thesegreat successes and you know my head...

...was a you know a little big and I gotthe opportunity to become VPS, lls and marketing for a company. So you knowtwenty nine years old. Have all these successes, and you know we grew thebusiness or whatever, but I got fired from that job by the board of directors. So that's where th the other side ofthe equation, Chad- and that was- I got fired it there in two thousand andthree- and I think maybe it was until two thousand and seven that I sort ofSaid Hey. Maybe it was me, you know it wasn't it wasn't them, and that'sthat's like a huge hard lesson to like to do that. But what I realized was thefinancial acumen that finance and investors use is a completely differentmetric system that you and I would use as salesleaders and that disconnect hasonly grown and fortunately I've seen it and I've been at least I've been ableto build relationships with other CFOs to figure out where my gaps are and andcorrect it. So I think those are the sort of the two parts sort of the hey.You have unconscious confidence, you know as a rep, and I was able to dothat and trade on my own personal brand within that company. But then, when Ilost all that personal brand, I didn't realize what I didn't know, because it's tooconfident and what I did and that failure has been. You know I think, agodsent. So it's like two two sides, but I go back to both of thosescenarios each time and I've learned a lot from that, and sohow does that take you? You know from those lessons now, director of theAlexander Group and founder of the sales enablement society. help usunderstand, t the next progression. What what made you want to go intosales and ablemen as aggressively as you have. I think, there's a couplepoints in that so being in sales for a lot of my life, I have a core beliefthat it's kind of unfair, that sales people and the sales organization isthe most blamed for, but also the most accountable function in eeedeeti yeah. It's what a tack someon us thesales right I mean it's usually about numbers, rightbut, they're, all moronsright. If O takions were only coinoperated, we're all mo or there's yeah right,exactly h. You know our job is super easy. We just need to take people outgolf and have an expense account. You know the product just sells itself. Imean I work for a CEO once that said, any monkey can sell our stuff. I wesaid that to the whole company, so I'm like okay, great we're a bunch ofmonkeys, but it doesn't work that way, and so I think therethere's that's oneelement, but I think another element is. I really really resonate a lot with theidea that selling is a team team sport and that there is a bunch of valueinside the company that if we can get sort of organized and streamlinedbehind and sort of Canfinkyoure that the business as a supply chain behindsales that it doesn't need to be so much conflict oriented. I think if wechange our focus- and you know Chad, one of the things we were talking aboutbeforehand- is an experience for customers that if we all recognize that,no matter what we're selling whether it be some transnational thing like adoorknob or something you know so strategic, like a digitaltransformation anywhere in between at the end of the day, we're still dldealing with people and people make both logical and emotive decisions. Andif we recognize that and start doing, you know start moving away from toomuch of the build out of the words or demonstration of the product andshowing all the metric and start going back to more of the human side. I thinkeverybody will benefit. Everybody's job...

...will be Sior, marketers job will beeasier, sellsperson's job will be easier. Finance person's jobwill beSier, so the bridge between where I am now as leading a practice at theAlexander Group and also found e mascils an Alan Society. Between thosetwo points, I had a huge opportunity to be a research directorate forester. Soif you don't know about the research companies, the analyst companies we doa lot of reseurch or or you do a lot of research and in order to build out so Ibuilt out the the sales of name, one practice. Two Thousand and eight weactually published e definition of sales, an AON which we still you knowseem to be doing today. Bu The key idea, Chad, you're about my age.Did you read spinselling yeah, so spin selling is great, because here we haveis a it's a shrink right. No RACKAM was a train psychologist and he had thisidea of talking to the head of sales at Zerox. Maybe talk to other head tosales. I don't know I I don't know meal rack them right, but I read the forwardin that book and I just thought it was such a cool idea of saying: Hey, I'm apsychologist. Maybe I can find patterns at Xerox, sellers of what what worksand that simple idea and going on interviews. He found some commonpatterns and boom. Now we've got spinselling and customer centricselling and solution selling and all these other derivatives genius wellthat core idea, I always wondered how come noone did that for buyers. Sothat's what we built our research around a forester is executive level,buyers and the Gapman between what buyers are looking for: Exthe,executive level, buyers and Beta bes selling Chad and what we're teachingthem and what we're equipping with it's so giant that it's almost impossible tocommunicate it's just night and day different and we're even like they'lluse a word outcome and then I'll talk to like some executives at say. Siscois like ll. Of course we sell outcomes lie well. That's not what tbeexecutives that executores, that just interview said that you're not andthey're using the same words and talking past each other, and I thinkunderstanding that stuff chat is exactly why we need to be more informed,O sellers and why I sort of got out of the researchbusiness, because I think what I found is that the research thatI would poblish I wrote for like the twenty percent of organizations that were really doingthis strategically and, as I got more and more strategic, the more negativefeedback I get from everybody. That's not the way to do it. That's not salsOten is a it's interesting. I've got measurable results over here and you'retelling me it's something else, so I think that we're only going to besuccessful if we find the twenty percent of people out there that arereally doing it right and that's why I joined the Ozander Group. The exandergroup's been in business for over thirty years, really working onoptimizing sales forces and building out sort of the financials of what asales organization looks like compensation, the segmentation. All ofthis connection to the business strategy and this whole idea of how weenable the supply chain behind sales have better conversations, is a new andVirginin area, so bun Joinan a consulting company. We can work in alot more detail about tackling some of these problems, an big companies, butthe kind of that is like all consulting you just sort of get consumed in youknow maybe five big prod checks a year and I lost all of those connections. Sothat's really what what led this starting, the societyis, really itstarted out officially in fedruaary two thousand and sixteen when I try to do ameetup group, basically to get some friends in DC and start talking about things, and youknow we had about twelve people show up to that first meeting an and we'vegrown since then. So what was the just for our listeners? Who may not betracking? What was the definition or...

...maybe not even the forcter definition?But what is your definition of sales enablement today? Well, I think, sincethat's something that were tackling as a society, I'd rather not offer what mypersonal opinion is. I think what we, what we need to really look at is: Whatdoes it mean ind each of the companies that were in because what I'd like usto do is stop the religious debates that are happening. It seems like sales,the marketing ore, Christians and Catholics. Christians are Pos, an toCatholics were just pounding, each other and then the rest of the world.You know the Pagans around the world are going. What the Hell is going onwith these people. They don't know what the Hellis going on. We don't want tolisten to their. You know, don't listen to their religion and I think that'swhat we're doing now is we're doing too much bashing. So for me, what I'drather us do is: How do we find systemic ways to unlock and on leashthe growth potential Lettin is in every one of our companies and that we're BenJu? How we look at it at more of an executive Lens, and how do we? How dowe examine? How do we get out of our way of looking at everything in anorganizational silo? So for me conceptually, I don't want to say thedefinition, Chad, but really. The idea of sales enablement is a executionfabric that you lay between the sales organization is trying to solveproblems or create new potential for customers and the business that set uptoday. That has to be organized around products because of financial reporting,but products aren't what people are buying today. People are buyingexperiences and outcomes, and in order to change and pivot, we need some newsome new strategies to overcome sort of the organizationnormal construct. So if I were to have you know the one phrase of that itwould be the concept of sales. ENABLEMENT is unlocking the growth potential imbeddedin every single company today, by creating an execution fabric to get therest of the company, streamline around solving problems for customers andequipping sellers to do it, and so that big different company to company I mean,if you think, about kind of the way team I mean, there's a typicalstructures right and and typical organizational IRARCHIES. That show up,but each company at least I'll, tell you at every at least hi've beentelling me every company. Of course they have different problems, althoughI don't know they sound the same as the last ten clients I had, but xactbutthere are. There are some nuances, and so I like that. I like that use of theof the term fabric, because it seems more flexible and something that canbecome more more of a differentiator for the organization as a whole. Isthat a fair kind of a assessment of how it can be implemented and potentiallybenefits realized yeah? I think I think your spot on right. There is, I think,part of our collective challenge is sells, a marketing professionals. Allof us is how do we get the REC F the company, torecognize that it's, not the products where the strategy the diferentiates isin the marketplace. It's how that's perceived by the Individual WalletOwners, the collection of individual waldowners that are writing checks. SoI think one big challenge chat is to help move away from. So one thing Ilike to talk about is it's important to have a go to market strategy, but Ithink it's also important to have a God. A customer strategy too, and I go tocustomer strategy- means Hey. Instead of focusing on what products we've got,what possibilities Wa might we be making for our clients instead offocusing on you know all of the different places or distributionmechanomism how we could get it an individual conversation. We alreadyknow sort of sort of the place. So what...

...is the prescription that we're offeringor the pattern like? How do we help our clients unlock that, instead ofpromotion? How we're going to get the word out? I don't know about you, but Idon't like being it. I like being interrupted at dinner, so little that Idon't even answer my phone at home anymore. I don't know about you. I,like my mom gets frustrated at Mishi, can never get a hold of me. Igyou gotTa text me. Two Thousand and Seventeem call me at home because I do not answerit at all, because I don't like being disrupted. So promotion isn't. Is it issort of disruptive what about a providing a path? How about we provideour clients, a path to success, how to get there and it's super confusingtoday, because everything is changing so rapidly and I think customers I areno customers value. That and sort of the last thing is instead of you know worrying about pricing toomuch. I think at the end of the day, it's really sort of how do we provewhat it is that how what we're providing is going tomake you successful and the way I like to think about that is: let's write thepress release of what happens after Wev worked together. How have you Chadbenefited from our company's involvement, and once you startthinking like that, then things become both super super complicated, realquick, but they also become super super simple, real, quick, also well, indsimple's, not always easy right, like the silicity of it is almost harder. Ifind it times for people to wrap their heads around than anything else. It'slike I, you know when I'm workng with clients and they say well, we lost thisdeal on price. I'm like hat priceis of fanom objection. It must rit in my it'sa fanom objection. It's a BS, it's a BS objection like you, ging, a cold call.All they did was basically tell you to go away. They HALG got on you. Youdidn't do your job not to sound two genex rough around the edges, but ifyou're losing on price, then you're not you're, not selling the right way,you're, not engaging the right way. You don't understand the people thatactually cansign the text. You don't understand what they want and how yoursolution connects to that. That is so so so right that the way that we'vebuilt out our measurement processes Nin most btob companies is we don't reallyeven have the ability to map out where the real problem was,which was we never connected with the you know, adult wallet you know thewith the adult money with the person wit, the ballet right, yourright woeld,never identify with them. In the first place we never MAPPD to their visionand one of the things that I find a lot I'd love to get your thoughts on thischat. Is that when companies use bant to score opportunities, I'm like youshooting yourself in the foot already, because from a buyer standpoint, oncethey've identified budget they've already gone through the approvalprocesses right. So therefore, once they'Vee gone through the approvalprocesses procurements become involved because they have to be involved, theyhave to in most companies and if it's, if proturments involved, guess whatwe're in a bakeoff Y and we weren't. If we weren't first we're probably goingto lose and that's another thing an if you don't mind if I'm going to ran alittle bit. I hear a lot of us talking about the CEB data or now gardener dataabout the fifty seven percent of a buyers journey is already completedbefore sales person even engages like well. You know what that might be trueif you use the word buying and if you use the wore buying and as sort ofRFRFP responding. Well Yeah. U That's not selling to me, that's not theselling that you learned tasten. The selling that I learned selling is aboutengaging around a business problem and helping to develop that idea and guesswhat you could say that it's sort of like a tale to s, cities with sailing,if so, selling stell to cities for as many opportunities that are out there,where theye are already through the buying process, there's probably moreopportunities where the clients have no...

...freaking clue what to do right and I ambeing completely completely non hyperbolicare. They literally have noidea what to do with a lot of the stuff. Well, no I mean those are always the best dealsto find I mean when I was an individual contributor. I didn't want somebody tocome to me and say hey. This is the problem I have, and this is what I need.I wanted to work with them and show them hey you, okay, that's cute! Youthink this is your problem. That's really not the problem! Here's thebusiness problem you've got now. Let's talk about something, that's going tosolve that problem, because I know you're not looking at it that way. Yet,right, though, engaging in that way, hat'Shit! That's why I got into salesthat type of that type of engagement and big problems that went straight tothe business. Don't come to me and tell me you need a new server or you needmore. You know: Data Storage or R, whatever it is. That's boring is hell to me, but when you canengage with somebody and actually talk to them about the problems that theirbusiness is having and help them go through that journey because theydidn't know where to go like you were saying, that's where the that's. What Ithink the true acument of a sales professional comes out, you're, so spoton with right at that and here's I think part of the difficulty is becauseour businesses have overrotated so hard to these financial analysis. One of theone of the problems of the financial analysis is they look at the salesforce in aggregate and one of the Thi. One of the projects that I like to liketo do with our clients is to basically break the sales force down in thequentiles and, What's interesting is when you do that. So that's like fifthsis a sorry I sounded like I jus sound like an Annis or second Thar Yeah. Iknow right e part. You wanted to punch in afaceaer IAS, Lkthe borster part right there. Ijust saw it yeah exactly you know, I'm gonna, I mean work to. I gn work to getrid of it. You spend too much time in Boston and that stuff rubs off on it break your d break yourself force owntheir fits, and then, when you look at it, you know one client in particularwel. This is basically true that anyone, but your top twenty percent of salessales people, their average contribution- was four point: fourmillion dollars in a year the next year after that was one point: five millionthe next year after that six hundred housand the next year after that twohundred fifty thousand the next year after that twenty eighthsand thinkabout that. But what they were doing is because they were analyzing everythingby aggregate performance. They were building out assumptions based on allof based on the amalgum of all of them. So no program was working for any ofthem and when you look at that- and you say what are the top reps doing- thetop wreps are literally trying like hell to not listen to what they'rebeing provided for by the rest of the company. But yet warm we've actuallyfound that enavalment, actually impeeds top rups success. The difficulty is toprups can't reall articulate what it is that they're doing we're not askingthem the right way. So I think that's a big challenge and Ithink the difficulty is imagine that you're, a top Rup and- and you have tonavigate to your clients- want combinations of a lot of yourcapabilities. So if you're a SASS company, you might have two or threedifferent soush products, so you would have to engage subject matter expertsthere, but then you'd have two different kinds of traning needs byyour client. You'd have training needs on the on the fun and part to make thebuyers feel comfortable about what it is. You know working a different wayand then training on the backend part about how to leverage the capabilitiesand then you'd also have different forms of professional services. You'dhave professional services to help get the client and buy in and then Yeu haveprofessional services to help implement...

...it. The way companies are today isevery one of those things that I describe ore separate PNL units andthey each want you Chad, to give they don't care about the other, the other groups. They want you to getthe most money out of that account for their one thing right so ou, then youcan't really trust them to put in front of the client, because they're going tooverrotate tha story that isn't going to be about your client, but you don'thave any way to articulate it, because every one of those people thinks you'rean idiot that you can't possibly know what the hell you're talking about. So we have these problems of. How do weconfigure those right resources and then some of the clients will actuallysay: Okay, we'll fix that by a business architect. But then, when do you bringthat business architect into your account? If you're measuring all youropportunities, byt wolls got Ta, do? IS THE CLIENT OT funding? It's like? Well,I don't know, but I've got access to the CIO. I think he can come up withsome money right N, we're overinstrumenting things and notusing sort of common sense, and I think a lot of friction that happens. We put our cells, people like you at amass ofe disadvantage because of this instrument, intrumentation that we putin to it well, and you also have, I think I've seen you have sales exactswho want to figure out like how Tho best enable their teams, but I sense-and maybe it's just me, but I sent some of them- have great deal of trepidation rightand a great deal of fear, because maybe they don't understand enablement, maybethere's two caught between the spreadsheets and their teams. You know,how do you help sales executives, revenue executives, get over that fearand actually embrace an effective type of enablement? So I think there is abunch of points to that question. I think putting myself in the seat of asales leader, one of the reasons that they tend to be resistant to you knowhelp its sort of like you know so. Chad, you and I are sortof picking on this genxor thing on the genic o think it's sort ofcynical like hey. You know we're from the government we're here to help like hey we're from we're here fromcorporate really hear to help and the sales leaders like I really need help,but boy. I really don't need that help soit's sort of like Rollon my eyes, butthen, on the flip side, the sales leaders do such a really piss poor jobof internal communications like they're, the greatest external communicators,but internally just get too frustrated right and people don't listen to them.So part of the problem that we've got is a requirement discussion and no onewants to take the time out to talk about requirements. We just want to dothings, do do do activity activity and then, when you get a lot of activity,you get a lot of random acts. So I think the first thing, if we're lookingat it through the Lens of the sales sales force, might be something assimple as taking and simple as hard. I don't want tomake. This is too difficult. But' an area I like to start with is hey, let'sbreak down so ched, let's say that you're, the head, your the VP of stateand local sales for a company so Li'sen make it alittle bit more real Chad, let's break down our tipeline and let's look at theopportunities that we have like baseball. How many first of all, tellme, who is the adult wallet owner that we want to have ourolers, have haveappointments with, in other words, which batters do want begin with bigt.That question alone is super hard for people to answer it s like okay. Well,we should probably know who is the wallet owner that we're after let'stell me a person, don't tell me a market, don't tell me state and local,don't define it by companies. Tell me an individual, because those peoplehave been avirial conversations. So...

...let's say that we want to have aconversation with department leaders in state and local stakethe local great.Now, let's come up with the list of all of those how many of them did we meetlast year and how man Y ar sales people currently meeting with Oh zero baby? We should concentrate on gettingmeetings with those people, but maybe let's just do that. Maybe let's justtry to get on first space. You know so let's have successful meetings and whatwould that look like? What is the messaging? What is the content? Whatkind of skills do we need and do we have the right skills to engage withthose people and, more importantly, how are we going to give sales people achance to feel comfortable, because I myself, when I try to call on CIOS wayback when, in you know the ninet Nin nine? I scared shitless con on executives and we've been somuch better. If I could role playit out to realize that there people too, butwe don't do that right, just go out and do it like go. My calls go my calls,and that makes you stress too, so you don't want to make mistakes, but if youdon't ever have that first conversation you're never going to have it either soyou're never going to get on first pace to begin with, so then the next thing would be. Whatdo we need to do? Get on first pace, t and the next thing that I haven't seenany company really do a good job of is okay. Now we need to get on second base.So how do we get a share? How do we know that we've had a successfulmeeting with that adult water, wlawlet honer, which had you and I know, that'sa simple thing- the client agrees: Hey Yeah Chat I'll, explore that with youfurther, I great that's a verifiable step. Awesome Perfect! We did it. Thequestion, though, is what does that conversation look like if we're showingup with prefab presentations or too much structured white boards orwhatever, and we're not listening to them? The likelihood of US gettinginvited back is huge because they're taking best pen in time and theirresources in their people and we're going to have to learn how to navigatea lot of people because th a lot of stakeholders an ball. That person thatwe're talking to Chad they're not going to do anything right, so go buy it, butthey're not going to do anything they're going to delegate all theirtests. So we got a now now our job is to go, get the bynand from everybodyelse. We have to advise him or her who needs to be involved. What the sequenceof steps the evaluation process could look like. We can't expect them to knowit because they've never bought the thing that we're we're selling UNTIbefore. So how would they know so? There's a lot of stuff in step to that.Just doesn't get done that we put on a back of salespeople, then step threesort of get the third base. How do we get a shared bisionoss success? Maybethat's our problem and when I do this by the way step foras, you know closethe business you get the home home place. What's interesting, Chatis when, when Ido a pipelane analysis using these four things and not all the sophisticatedsales steps- and you know of a eight step or twelve step, I've seen ty stepsales methodology, it's rigor for Riggor's sake, but it's not reallyinformative. When I look at it based on on this most of the sales cyclespipelines that that I see they don't look like that. Nice neat invertedtriangle, look like a bow of Constrictor, that's even kick yeah and where are they stuck? Thoseopportunities are stuck in Stage three that shared vision of success. At theend of the day, the client just can't see why moving forward will help and ifthey can't see it, if they can envision it, they're not going to feelcomfortable. The political risk is too great, so they'd rather invest themoney in their political capital elsewhere, and it's such a big problem that I've hadto give it an identity. When I do redouts is that your biggest compettoris in the up bi no decision incorporated because too many peopleare focused on who they think their...

...competitors are. But when we, when wecreate the variable Indi it dwarfs, you can add up the losses to all the otheractual competitors and add them all up. It still doesn't add up to losing theIndia. That's how giant of a whole we've got at Stage three, and I don'tsee a lot of conserative effort to focus it on that either and then youknow bringing it home if you've done. If you got on first base second baseand third base, closing that's just a lot easier. Well, it should be a jshould be a normal outcome of a well executed sales approach, it shouldn'taveright and it's never it like: okay, home home, maybe the clothes but n.When I work with clients, it's always about I'm more interested in okay yeah,you got a close, but when are you going to be back in there back with themanalyzing the value that you've provided? When are you going to go backand say? Okay, they have this business issue, you sold him, you got him aroundthe you got him around the field and now you're coming back for the Allstargame to talk about hey what were the results? Your Business saw, as you know,out of buying and working with us on this. Let's look at the valuerealization and that allows you to upselve crosssale go across theorganization things like that, and I just I'm not seeing a lot of people doit and I don't know I mean, like I said earlier, it keeps me employed becausethat's what I hepe a do, but but but I don't understand why why everybody isso focused on the spreadsheets on, but this is whereI am an at this step, and this is where I am at this like you. Yes, you need todo that, but there's a you get paralyzed al most, I see ise salesexacts and reps get paralyzed looking at their computer screen, instead ofbeing in front of Hend working with the customers. You're, right and- and Ithink the direction of this, though, is I want to make sure that we're notsaying the source of the challenges with sales. I mean the othe thing thatI will say absolutely that sales can do a much better job of tey sayingsimplifying, because I think that when they talk about the pipeline, an theforecast they overcommunicate so much detail ti learned o know why I got fired. I can so muchdetail that the bosses, first of all, they don'twant to admit that they don't know, but they don't and then it's so muchoverwhelming information that they feel uncomfortable and- and it's too easy topoint out and consistences when you have a ton of stuff when you just leadwith, say, Hey, here's a simple model to think about sales, and we need helpin these particular areas. Now I can articulate what my requirements are,but on the flipside, though, the rest of the organization there's no onethroat to choke using jenax language, you can, I'm sure you're rolling youreyes and thinking about all the human resource violations that I'm doing.When I talk to you, but Iknow at's, Al Good, it's Akay exactlyright, you know, Tto, you know Middle Middle Age, guys talking. There is no throat to choke fors thesupply chain behind sales. Is it marketing doit marketing? Is it demandjen? Is it the solutions marketing? Is it the product marketing? Is it thebrand marketing? Is it the analyst's relations group who says that they dothat? which group is it or what about within sales themselves? How manydifferent sales, overlays or so's best practices are so excellence or Solleoperations or Celes training or Sel playbooks or things? Are we generatingor heck what about human resources getting into the game, with therecruiting that they're doing an and the work that they're trying to dothere? Orthe learning and development activities of the training program,other kinds of training programs of the culture work that they're doing andfiance bless their hearts are trying to help by providing more structure to thepipelines and porcasting and the like. So everybody is in the business ofhelping sales and there's no structure or governance orpriortization to all of those random...

ACXSOF, stills enablment, so stepnumber one is, I think the sales ormanizition needs to step up and Tayheres what the requirements are. But then somebody's got to look at this andsay: okay, what are we enabling to? Are we enabling a checklist based on awhole bunch of product launches and weactive things, which is what we gettoday? Is The byproducts of lots of deliverables and mots of things thrownover the lot of sales people, but somehow, miraculously Albert Einsteincouldn't put together and figure out what we're going to ask oursalvespeople to do? That's one thing, or are we talking about enabling sales peopleand say that you know what the assumption is that most of ourselves,people suck and we need to make them more executive sellers to sell the cxos,and I have yet to meet ACXO. I A specific sea level person to sell tothank you. Thank you not see at so so are we goine enable them to do that ordo checbe Challenger sellers or whatever, or we goenenable them to becustomer advocates and then, if so, who's the one source of knowledge aboutcustomers inside a company today and there isn't one. So I think there aresome really fundamental questions that need to be asked and elevated for thissales. Enabent problem tat they truly truly addressed, and I think theheadest sales could do do themselves, a huge favor by taking the time to callit out, instead of resisting in a sort of the. When I talk to other Seles Likore, chated sort of like this thing I, like ask got. Why do I want to want tofight with City Hall, because you haven't fought city hall and ten yearsDude and now you don't really have complete authority over your hiringpractices, it shared with finance and human resources. You don't really havethe right say in terms of the head count that you want, because it'salways going to get a line d when you build groups, overlay groups financesthat becomes too expensive and you can't account for it. So they make itcut it. You don't really have to say in termsof the messaging, because that's done by various marketing departments and likeso I'm going to ask you other than the people that you manage directly. Whatcontrol do you have in your fate and we got to quit fighting city hall, and so I think that through the lens of thesales leader, that's a place to start and what's going to be interesting, is orwhat I found is interesting, that the biggest ally is typically the CFO. Ifyou can get past the pipeline conversation Ens, an not you know intothe in of the weeds too quickly. So is that is all that, where kind of theidea for the sales en ablement society came from, where was what was theinspiration for founding that and starting that and getting that rolling?Well, that's a great question so that the I guess in retrospect to make it simpleis when you I don't want to say this is true with anybody when I got involved at forester and you getthere for six years and you have all of this input. I mean I I interviewed Iinterviewed atcfos. I had data points of two tousand executive level barsboth in th survey data and interview data. Over over period of time Ipresented to sales kickoffs of at least fifteen twentyhsand raps you get hiredto be. You know a keynote speaker all this other stuff,ohe people kind of kiss your, but you tend to think you have the answer andyou can kind of become a little arrogant. So I think I was sort of pushing the answer toohard. You know Si I got the Antwer, I got the answer. I got the answer, but Idon't think that we were as a market really aware of what the challenges areand guess what I didn't have the answer. I had a part of the answer. Just likeyou have a part of the answer, so the idea that society was really and one ofthe things that that I do is, first of all what our waywe are a completely volunteer...

...organization, so I mentioned that westarted out sort of like as a local meetup. It was for me to have friends,is sort of a transition period of mad de Assafldasol, ing myself. Maybe you can edit that out for thekids? Oh, no! No, I'm keeping that Oi'll just put nsfw on images for thisone, not SAF for work, so that' help with the ratings right right,yeah it'll probably be the most downloaded upsode e've go, but as part of that process and ading,these metucrots and interesting things happen. You start to realize that heywe want to be inclusive here. We don't have you know Catholic Protestantdebates, let's be all inclusive. Everybody in the organization should befocused on revenue growth, but it's a team sport and why are we beingexclusive of that must be inclusive. So we got to a point where we were havingthese local chapter meetings that were just awful. So that's I'm going back toset. You know from February March April, a two thousand and sixteen these areterrible meanings, because they're sort of unstructured and open or whateverand we'd have about twenty people come here there. But if you saw a fight club,we started to have another chapters: orthe people in other CITIS, saying hey:Can you start that? Can you start a grup there and it's difficult to do andit's all volunteers and you know- have a day job of actually doing consultingwork and trying to win business that way. So we got this idea of having November in November, two thousand andsixteen to take a section of our Alexander Group's conference and invitepeople to show up sort of like the decoation of independence thing. Youknow that that cancontinental Congress Yep it invite people who had an opinionabout sales and en want to come in and say hey what should this be? So weofficially formed at that meeting where we had over a hundred people show upand create a you know, a mission that everybody sign, like the decoration ofend independence, to that we exist to promote nooat the roll. So our storynow, then, is all right. We want to test this thesis about what growthactually is and in order to test that we made sort of like this pack, wepicked out. We made very crazy objectives in February of two thousandand seventeen like ridiculous objectives. I mean we don't even haveenough. We didn't have an organization we just founded. We only had like twoor three chapters and we said we're going to be an organization dedicatedto figure igh out with Prophis, and we picked some really ridiculous goals. Soyou know keep in mind your founding an orization picture e did getos goal, soone goal was that we were going to have fivethousand members by the end of the year, crazy than we said we're going to havetwey chapters. You know which is Awesom just crazy. We were going to create ourown platform for all of our members by the way membershipis free right nowright. So how do you create a platform with no resource? No money, no fulltime, employees literally from scratch? How do you do that? But now that's agoal that we're going to do we're going to ceate a common platform for atbut adedicated place for everybody Wolg et. You know what we're going to do we'regoing to have a conference and how do you get a conference going without anymoney? I mean company places you have to have it at a place right. We can'thave it a barn Y to place, so you have to get a placeto agree to do it and they want money. How do you do that, but ask Rit we'llfigure it out. So we have a conference. We were going to reach out to an entityto cover us. You know to like one of these magazines or places, becausethere was no dedicated sales and they werent coverage at this time last year.What else? So? Those are just a few of the few of the goals, and here we are on October elevent andsomehow without again on what makes you...

...super clear. We don't have a bankaccount. There's no bank account, there is no money. All of the work is donecompletely by volunteers, itce people buying ind of the vision andparticipating in it, and we are building an orgg structure as we grow,so we didn't have that. So that means people are joining to a volunterorization without knowing exactly what to do or what a culture is, but overthat over the time between February and now we have two thousand two hundredmembers, which is obviously shy of five thousand. I pretty impressine, I meanthat's them impressive, a hundred to two thousand and two hundred Yep, andby the way we don't have a single place. There is no website to go to to sayhere's what a member is Sol, it's kind of like a quest, Ng outhow to join, and then one of thebig questions is so. How do I know what I'm joined or not like? I know whetherI emember or not so the Sun Moweo, we of US Hav, to work out. Here's Someinthat I'm kind of proud of we have twenty nine chapters, wow ble, that inthe bolthe water, yeah and here's the amazing thing we have chapters in Egypt,Egypt in Germany, an Holland in the UK and Ireland, in Australia, Singapore,India and Canada and of course the US I mean think about the global expansionthere in what eleven months and that kind offootprint and some of our biggest one of our biggest chapters is actually inLondon, Oh wow, yeah, that's main the impressive spread I mean in elevenmonths. Yep We have a platform, so we were able using our members, were ableto persuade or work out an arrangement with higher logic. Hirologic is aenterprise class community platform provider, so we were able to get themto donate. That that well, not totally donate, there's other things to it, butstill in the business of creating something ont of nothing to create a deal to. Let us leverage thatenterprise class software. So how do you go about a membership? How do youget two thousard members which are dispersed and we don't have a commondatabase, because that we require money and infrastructure? How does anorganization with no money deploy enterprise class software because youhave to configure it? You have to build AP, you know sort of a plan for it. Youhave to. You have to deploy t you have to cum up with an adoption strategy andall that, and you also have to do program management all of those thingsso in enterprise. You know, if you're, if you think about deploying enterprisesoftware, think about like what that would look like the budget that you doto go through the program management place that you put them and involvedthe amount of work that you do on working on the requirements, the impleementation strategy, the roll out, and how long that might that be? Maybe ayear. Let's say it's six months, you know you're moving really fast sixmonths and then you have a budget and you can hire external people to go andconfigure that we had none of that. But you know what we did. We with ourmembers, who are again volunteering at night doing this stuff four months theyconfigured it and rolled it out and in terms of like verifiable metrics. If wehave two thousand two hundred members, we have over nine hundred a over ninehundred people, who've gone through and FA and logged into the system andestablished their own profiles. That's a forty five percent rate, you knowactidation rate and in companies today, like you can say. Well, that's no big dealwit. Show forces like that's, but you put the rule in that people won't getcompensated unless they use it. Don't have that we'll have that lover,there's no sto it right. We have only e the goal of influence and persuasionand forty five percent is a ridiculous metric and the fact that it was done infour months with no project management...

...with no people. What was projectManagen done a completely different way? How about the fact that we're GOINGTOhave a conference, and we designed a conference by practitioners, fourpractitioners, it was marketed by practitioners and is being delivered bypractitioners. All volunteers are doing all of that stuff and, of course, Syo.Look at it and say well, where's the gender where's, this where's that Yoget all the knocks and yes, we had to create. We don't officially have a bankaccount, we've hired a company to manage this stuff. For so we can keepthe keep true with a we don't have a we don't have a bank account, so weoutsource that and we needed to pay for it and we're not from what Iunderstand it's and maybe a listener can call us out if this isn't true,what I understand, it's very unlikely or ver, very uncommon for a company tonot lose money on its first conference. Well, we're going to be able to convertsome of this money and fund other things. We're set up as a nonprofhetorization. So it's not technically profit, but the whole experience is tthe partners. So, typically, at a conference, you'd have sort of a roomof of suppliers right well, we're not letting them call themselves, suppliersor vendors or anything like that, and we're not letting them set up asseparate Booz wor designing those people is part of the engagement, sothe sponsors are designed into the engagement and we're encouraging themas like. Look if you show up and talk about YEU products, you're Goin, tocome off like jerks, why don't you tell stories about how you've helped otherpeople be successful and every one of our members Hav geoing to want to do it?We've had a hundred percent conversion rate on our sponsorship requests andnone of them know how to do it. So we had to set up a member to help managethat experience. We have all of these things. I mean we're going to have acoverage desk, who we're going to do live feeds from it to be able tocapture the buzz out of it. All of our sessions are interactive andThalike, and we're going to sell out to our conference is going to sell outthere's only a few mount of tickets on October tent October. Eleventh there'sonly a few left, but you know it's going to sell out and maybe this time amonth ago, people are worried about whether or not we should have theconference or not crazy. So, Oh and then we have a partnershipwith selling power magazine. So selling power magazines been an business. Foryou know. Twenty years, everybody in sales you're, certainly a femillar withthat Oh yeah they're, getting you dedicated sales and am wont, CutCoverage and we're the content. Editors of that and we're going to be supplyingall the people to provide membership there we're going to have anannouncement in October that I can't share with you yet, but stealing withthe University of Texas Dallas we're building partnerships between education,educators, like chat, you know that todate there's not been one reportwritten and I'm sure I'm getting a wrong thesis or whatever ductoro studyin the academic community about sales and Awan, not one, not one, not one,not at all Yone, not one, not one, zero! That's going to change so we'rebuilding a community of of educators to partner with us on that we're reachingout to industry analyst, and we built a group we are taking over the definitionof sales in Alan. That's why I didn't want to ask you tell you it's notreally for me to say what my definition is tells him. I Li should sell t here'show I think about it, but in terms of what the definition is to set ourprofession forward, our members are doing it and we're running it like theconstitutions who ere coming up with the Virginia Plan. Right now or SouthFlora chapter is doing it. The whole chapter is doing it they're working inpartnership. We have industry, analysts, serious decisions, CSO insights and IDC are participating and helping UScraft out that we have educators involved. We have practitioners, threeteens and practitioners, and we have...

...vendors involved, and I don't know ofan of a standards group. That's ever been run by practitioners and executedby practiters norma its like you know the companies getting together likesoiny and be Sony and everybody else getg together and say this is what thsis. You know we're going to desmide for you, yea ware, you morons ourselves, and it's super hard, becauseall we want to do is disagree with each other. Of course, guys. We got toelevate and we're rolling out the Virginia Plan there and we're going tohave at our conference like this warroom, where people can come in andcomment on it and then, after that, we're going to ratify it and send itback out to our twenty nine chapters and have each chapter vote on it andthen say we have decided that this is what it is. So I just think it's it's ait's a miracle. What can happen when you unlock an unleash humans who arefocused on growth and passionate about sales and marketing? What we canaccomplish, if we're freed up from conventional wisdom and not havinganybody that we have to answer to by money, helps us do it and then, afterthis conference, when we show all the amazing things that everybody's doingched we're going to be able to say, look what we accomplished book at thesegrowth mestrics without any money without any resource without anyorganization structure. Now imagine what we could do if you'll, let us doit inside our companies and give us the resources to do it and give us theright way to do it. This is what we can do and help unleash growth, ind,everyoneor, a companies, it's an impressive, are Co. What's that it's animpres, impressive accomplishment, I mean seriously. I mean in that kind oftime frame to pull that kind of off that many people around the globe. Imean not at all volunteers. You don't hear that. You don't hear stories likethat these days, no, no and it's because we stayed focused instead oftalking about all the things ben the amount of Knox. You should do this. Youshould do this. You should do this. Those were all checkless things we arefocused on the community. We are focused on. You know the bar the kindsof things that you talk about all the time when you talk about what salespeople should do, we're just trying to do that at a at a broad Broadway andthe things that we're learning is how difficult it is because it's so hard tobuild an organization around a experience of customers and that'sreally what what we're going to accomplish at our conference is we'reabout elevating each individual person's ability to perform a littlebit better when they go back on Monday, we're about elevating their role intheir department inside their organizations and we're about elevatingthe profession and when you look at each of those different lenses, there'sdifferent tracks for each one. But when you look at all this all of thisinformation together, we've learned a lot by doing rather than thinking aboutit or building spreadsheets or check list, or anything like that. Wedidn'tbuild one checklist and we didn the One spreadsheet weconcentrated on focusingon members and what that would look like and having the conversations thatI think you and I both learned. You know when we learned about sales way.Wayway way way back when so Anywaye, it's I'm God, Damn Proud of what thesepeople. I really am, and it's remarkable to bepart of it I mean it should be. It is again definitely an impressiveaccomplishment. So, let's kind of Pivit here for a second change direction. Alittle bit. I always ask Hor, guess two standard questions at the end of everyinterview. First, one is, you know, you're working for the Alexander Group.That makes you a prospect. Tha, that's the polite word yet make sure a targetfor sales professionals. So I'm curious when somebody wants to get yourattention. What somebody wants to sell you something somebody that you don'tknow. What's the best way to go about capturing your attention to buildincredibility with you, that's it that chat. That's a remarkably greatquestion that everybody should ask all the time. I think it's be authenic andwhat I mean by that is be lunt. Hey,...

I'd like to start a conversation withyou be sincere, say: Hey if it doesn't work out, it's cool. I just want to getthe conversation going and then number three show that you know somethingabout me or align with me that we're going to be able to have a valuableconversation. What I can't stand is hey look at my demo or Scottare you and thein the need of Xy NZ. I should start publishing. Maybe maybe this issomething we could do to Chad Start publishing like the bad examples,iuabad sales people, I use the CRAPPI ones in class. All the time yeah publish itlet's, make hem known likethis is terrible, but just show that you're going to be a human being withme, and I don't know all the answers. That's the miraculous thing about thesociety or that's Alfso ther, like it's tough, to say as as a consulting head,that I don't have all the answers. Maybe that's not good for business, but you know what it resonates, becauseit's authentic my job isn't to come to you as as an executive and say I gotall the answers. My job is to share with you the war stories this SAS. I'vebeen there with you before, and I have an approach of how we cound figure itout together. If people engaged with be that way, damn I'd spend a ton of timewith them and then I'd also want you to sort of participate with me to figureout what we could do together, because money is, is the Greece to make thegrowth engine go? I want to give out money if it's going to help grow, butif I'm just giving you money so that I can meet your quota or buy yet anothertechnology that I'm not going to use, I'm not really interested in that. Itgoes back to that experience thing. We were talking about Igo, it's Gota. It'sgot to be back to the experience working from the customer back andeverybody people by from people end of the day. It's not going to changepeople by Yeah Yep, so showing up and being authentic is really really hard,but I at least on my end of the table. It resonates so much more excellent,all right so last question: We call it our acceleration insight. There was onepiece of advice you could give to: Sales, marketing or professionalservices, people just one piece of advice that you believe would help themhit their targets. You know achieve their goals. Whatwould it be and why it's not about you and pausing for dramatic effect about you, and I'm saying this is sortof a self recovering person who beats the crap out of myself about? Oh, my God, I'm not doing this.I'M NOT DOING THAT! It's not about your humans. Everybody's got a differentmindset and and view of the world, and your number one job is to figure outwhat so, let's say that you're selling to a a customer, your job is to firstfigure out who the adult wall owner is and figure out what their mindset isaligne to it. And then what is the mindset of the people that work forthem so that you can imagine make that come true? Then you have to do the samething with all the re sources that you need to bring to bear inside yourcompany. It's not about you, you're, just a conductor, and if you startrecognizing that it's about being that conductor you'll be way wayway moresuccessful. I just think it's extra hard an today's day and a age chat,because we get these onewonders of you need to do this. You need to do that.You need to do this and we're on monthly sales calls to evaluate apipeline that reinforces know it is about Youchad, your number, so yournumbers are great or your numbers were great lastquarter, but they set now.You know what have you done for me lately and rising above that iscritically important to be successful, because no one's going to buy from youunless you're about them- and it's just so so hard today, but it's not aboutyou agread one hundred percent Scott,...

...if elisers interested in talking to youmore about the sales, neighborment society or Alexander Group, what's thebest way to get in contact with you so that the number one easiest way to geta contact with me is unlinked in or my email address. You send me a directoremail, so linke en just find Scottt Anto Chi and connect I'm kind ofliberal with the connections there, because I like to engage with peoplebut on email- and you know- please, you know be sincere, but that's sSantucci at Alexander Groupcom. Those are those are my preferred methods andthen, if now eventually, I may give you my cellphone s like the best way to get ahold of me. Now we were talking about that chatow. An E on, but yeah Texis is a great waybecause I can at least respond back to when I'm on a conference call orsomething excellent Scott. I can't think you enough for taking the timeday has been absolutely great to have you on the show gay. Can I plug this?For a second sure I want. I want everybody to know a couple thingsnumber one. The questions that you ask are reallysmart and I think sometimes, when you're listening to something you justsort of go and just sort of listen, every one of the questions that youaskd are practical and pragmatic, not theoretical. So I think that's reallyimportant to know is that when you're listening to information are you in?Are you listening to something that's about? Can I execute it and will itwork rather than oh? That's a good idea, everybody's talking about artificialintelligence. Of course the world is going to be all robot selling therobots Ye. I think that's incredible. I think alsowhat no one else knows. That's listening the amount of effort that youpersonally put in to prepare for this is amazing. Now I'm not saying this tobe critical, but I get his email and I've done several podcast beforenormally. What I do chat is I just sort of take over. If I don't know what' totalk about S, I just like CRA. That's what I'm Gong to talk about, but what'samazing about having structure is it actually allows for a lot betterconversation? It seems oxy Mironic, but what what Chad does is? First of all,he has somebody reach out. You know, find find people to go connect withwhich is like okay, that's kind of neat, then there's the scheduling step, andthen I give some talking points or some ideas and then step number four. I getthis email. That is, I don't want to say long because I don't want to. Idon't want to have that implication: But's thorough and it's organized andit's structured- and it shows number one to me what commitment youhave to your listeners, which is Goddamn, fantast and chat. Have we evertalked before? I don't believe we have. I mean I think, we've exchanged someemails, especially in the earlier days of the enablement society, but I don'tbelieve we've ever actually spoken ever it spelt before and listen. I mean itsounds. I don't know, I don't know about you, but it sounds to me to me. Ithink, if I'd be listening to this, it sounds like we've known each other fora long time. That kind of delivery is only only able if you go through thatsort of structure, and we chatted you know beforehand like humans, Hey tellme your story, he'm tell you story what you think and we talked a bittle aboutjnexing and things like that. So that's why we were referind about Jenexing. I think it's remarkable and I thinkthat that kind of dedication that you show to your just for something thatsomebody could think is as Trivaly as a pot trivial is a podcast says a lotabout you and you're. Definitely somebody that love to stay more in contact with,because I'm thoroughly impressed, and sometimes when you're listening tosomething you don't appreciate all the work that goes into it and Shitchat. Ithink you should do with podcast on how you make a podcast. It's it's funny actually so e. When wefirst started this, we started using an...

...agency called sweetfish media and JamesCarber he's pretty prolific on Linkedin and he put up a post about how he doespodcast annee. I mean he aims for fifteen to seventeen minutes, I'm goingfor longer format, but he and they do it daily. So there's a couple ofdifferences, but he puts up he's like yeah. We just pick a topic and then wehop on Scipe and we start talking and I got on link it and I'm like yeah. No, Itotally disagree. I don't believe that that, especially for the types ofguests that I want to bring on an entice in the value that look, I'mdoing it for selfish reasons, I'll be ready up front. I like talking toexecutives and sales professionals to learn from them. I want to learn andI'm constantly trying to evolve, yeah. Okay, it turns out that our listenersenjoy it and we get a lot of great feedback, but the end of the day. I gota goal here and that's educate myself and make those connections and beauthentic. So to me it just takes it takes more time. It takes more thoughtand out of respect for your time, my time and the goals that you know we'retrying to accomplish her. I think it takes a little bit more time than heyhere's, my sky by Dea, let's just wrap for fifteen minutes yeah and I well.Hopefully it chose ind an I think. If you're I hate, Tho call us outup, youcan maybe edit this sout if you don't want, but if you're listening to thispodcast, I think you should give chats and feedback like this is the kind ofeffort this person puts into something I'm one hundred percent sure if yougave him feedback as hey. Here's, how I do it. I put my headphones on and Ilisten to you while I mow them lawn and I like the fact that it sounds like aconversation that I'm into an about topics, give thim that kind of feedback.So he knows he's on the right track, because I don't know about you, Chad,but I've gotten accustomed to only getting negative feedback and, like you,can't keep rechanging everything but about but about giving them thefeedback of the stuff. That's working or, I think also what would be valuableis don't you want to hear what you know three shows and go what somebody didand then give Chad some of that story, because I'd love, he I'm sure he'd loveto be able to say hey. You know three episodes. We talked about prospecting,here's one of the ideas of one of our listeners, of what they did and here'show they turned that idea into action. I think, if you could give him some ofthat feedback Dang it. I think it would be fanfantastic and as a listener ofpodcast myself, I'm like I get invested in the author and you know to havesomebody put this kind of effort into it. I'd be all bested in e know. WhatChad thinks well help chat out, give him a call or leave a voice, mall formor something like that: Send Hem an email and say here's what I did. Here'swhat I liked about that! Here's! What what matters to me, because the reasonthat you're listening to this is you want to get better. Who wants to hearabout complaints I'll? Take it all, and we do actually,if you guys, Git the BTOB revizack website, there's a link, you give you,we got a feedback for m. If you give me feedback I'll shoot, you fivelarstarbucks Gift Card for your time, good, bad, indifferent! I like Scotts ideas.So again, I'm doing this and we ask for the reviews on Itunes, because I wantto know what you guys want to hear. I mean yes, I'm doing it for selfishreasons, but there are other people out there. I get emails. I do get some ofthose complaints. I do read them for those that don't get a response back,I'm a genxor. My response back would not be particularly professional, so so so, but I do want to feed back and-and I do appreciate that the compliment Scott again, it's been awesome. Havingyou on the show. Everybody please check out the BTOB revezact website shore,the family, with friends, show the show with friends, family coworkers. Youlike what you hear. Please drop a serview on itunes. We do look at thoseregularly until next time. We have value prime solutions with you allnothing, but the greatest success you've been listening to the btobrevenue executive experience to ensure that you never miss an episodesubscribe to the show in Itunes for your favorite podcast player. Thank youso much for listening until next time.

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