The B2B Revenue Executive Experience
The B2B Revenue Executive Experience

Episode · 3 years ago

Public Speaking Secrets to Close Major Deals and Calm Heart Palpitations with Diane DiResta

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

The power of speaking should be an integral part of your sales and marketing strategy. Being a compelling speaker can position you as a thought leader and lead to more closed deals.


To learn more about the power of effective public speaking, we spoke with Diane DiResta, the founder and CEO of DiResta Communications, Inc. She is a certified speaking professional, international keynote speaker, executive speech coach, and author of Knockout Presentations.

When they're speaking, they tilt their head to one side and while that is a listening gesture, it's weak, because what afropologists tell us is that when an animal surrenders in the wild, it exposes its snack. So subliminally, your audience is picking up weakness, even though they may not be thinking about it consciously. You're listening to the BB revenue executive experience, a podcast dedicated to helping the executives train their sales and marketing teams to optimize growth. Whether you're looking for techniques and strategies or tools and resources, you've come to the right place. Let's accelerate your growth in three, two, one. Welcome everyone to the Bob Revenue Executive Experience. I'm your host, Chad Sanderson. Today we're talking about the power of speaking as part of your sales and marketing strategy. Why is it so important? The current business environment, how it positions you as a thought leader and, of course, how to do it effectively, since this is something many people have fear on a regular basis. It's to tackle this topic we have with US Diane Derestaff, the founder and CEO of do rest of communications. Dayan's a certified speaking, professional, international keynote speaker, executive speech coach and author of knockout presentations. Her works been featured on media outlets like CNN, Bluebirg Radio, New York Times, Wall Street Journal and many more day and thank you for taking time and welcome to the show. It's great to be here. Chat excellent. So let's start with an understanding of why public speaking became the focus of your career. This is something that many people run from with a great deal of fear and trepidation. So help me understand how this became the focus and passion for what you do day to day. You know you're so right about people fearing it. It's interesting. I was thinking about how I got started and when I thought back, even as a child I was correcting people's speech. Going to college and got my masters and speech pathology and from there I worked in those schools...

...for a number of years and then made a career change and started doing stand up speaking training with a company and went on from there to Solomon Brothers doing training for management, and then my last full time job was assistant vice president Directel Burnham, where I was working with the training floor, recruiting and Training Fixed Income Traders to actually go through the program so I've always been in some kind of speech and communication my entire life and I got interested in it because as I was a speech to the bologist, I got tapped to do some teacher training. So I started doing seminars and realized I liked it and that positioned me to get the job at the training company that did public speaking and the rest is history. And when we say public speaking, let's let's be clear for the arts, we're not just talking about standing in front of a room of a thousand or two thousand people giving a presentation. We're talking about standing in front of any room of any people. Maybe it's prospects or customers right where you're presenting and you have to have and convey a certain amount of confidence and and grab a gravitoss. But I'm curious in those two different scenarios, big open rooms, maybe a more intimate setting with the customer prospect are there different ways to gain confidence and and portray that Gravitas that people should be thinking about, or is it really just a core set of best practices for publics being at work, no matter the size of the venue? Well, you're absolutely right, about the definition of public speaking, because people think it's speaking in front of a hundred people and it's not. Big Myth and I often say to people I'll tell you this quick story that answer your question. I was speaking to a group and one day after the presentation, I went into the ladies room and it overheard someone talking about my presentation. And, by the way, if you want to know the real truth, you go into the restroom and what she said was I thought she was good, but...

I don't public speak and I wanted to shake her because yes, you do public speak. The question I ask is, do you leave voicemails? That that's public speaking. Do you give updates at meetings? That's public speaking. So to your question, there are a course set of skills. However, how you use them, how you manage them, is a little bit different depending on the venue. So you mentioned earlier as a public speaking as a thought leadership skill. More and more I'm seeing sales professionals having to do what I call them in our selling. They are getting a group Pete together for dinner or lunch in there talking to groups as opposed to just oneonone. So when you're on a stage or in a bigger venue, you need to use the same skills but expand upon them. So it's how to use the room and the staging. You need to cut show up bigger, you have to project a lot more you it takes a lot more energy. So it's a true performance. However, when you're in a smaller setting, let's say at a table with a few people, you don't want to be booming because aggressive need to tone them down and you need to be able to use the skills that are appropriate to that venue. So, to answer your question, yes, we need to modify it and change it for each setting. And I know in my own experience. You know we teach and train large groups of people simultaneously or smaller groups, anywhere from say, fifteen to fifty in a room, give a take, and it is use the word performance and I don't think it's a just you said that that actually, when I am up there training and working with the room and trying to capture the attention, it is a bit of performance and it does change based on the size of the room and my mic dim I not Mike Tower, the table set up. You know, what are the where the displays? How are people turning from me to getting visuals that may be presented. It's a bit of a Juggling...

Act. It's not necessarily into it. You don't just show up and I actually wrote a whole chapter in knockout presentations on setting the stage because if you're in that kind of venue, it you can derail. You can have the best sales presentation, but if the staging isn't right it'll impact in a negative way. So you need to coordinate and time and the key here, I believe, no matter what the venue or size is, engagement is your audience engaged, and there are different ways to do that, whether it's large or small. So if you're in a smaller group it's more intimate, there can be more of a dialogging and conversation. If it's a large group, you can still have that engagement but it's in smaller snippets, it's smaller exercises, but you can still do similar things and and it's a it's not something you know. I've heard people say who a public speaking is a soft skill and I probably, before I found myself, you know, in front of large rooms giving presentations or were teaching of the way that we do, I might have believed that, but I did notice specifically in some of the materials you, Centerer, that you used to call it right out. So public speaking is not a soft skill at all. Can you help us understand that? Thank you, Chad, because this drives me crazy. I do a lot of work in corporations and they always called me a soft skill, when you know what, this is a soft skill that has hard bottom line results. There is a true return on investment, or Roi, and I want to give you some examples because people, I don't, I think, don't realize this. There is a CEO in a pharmaceutical company that I worked with and he had a goal of convincing the executive committee to fund the Building of a vaccine facility, which would cost three hundred million dollars. There was no guarantee of success and then there would be three years of clinical trials. So this...

...was a high stakes sales presentation. So he worked with me for a number of months and coached him on how to be more persuasive, how to put it together. We got into the minds of the listeners and the end result is he got the sale. However, that initial three hundred million dollars turned into a one billion dollar success. Yeah, so that is hardcore on investment. And imagine if he didn't have the presentation skills to convince the executive committee, they would have lost out on all that revenue. I can give you another example when I was asked to help the committee for the senior management to speak at investor day and the CEO saying, look, we have our committee, you've got to get them tight. They've got to be no more than twenty minutes. We really want our stock to do well. So we did and the email I got a few weeks later was that it was a success. It was well received, the animals gave them a good rating and their stock was at an all time high. So speaking can move markets. It is powerful. Well, I mean it's impression, right. It's impression of intelligence, of commitment, understanding of a particular market or topic. It's confidence. It builds trust. You know somebody who can command a room and manage it effectively, it's more likely that the people that you're talking to are going to trust and be willing to make an investment with you or collaborate with you to achieve some results. So I think, and I'm with you saying it's a saw skill. I wish it was that simple, quite honestly, but it's really not. I mean there are a lot of things that go into, you know, doing it well and it takes you, know, like anything that you want to do well takes practice. In my experience. Is that something that you've seen as well? I always say it's ninety percent preparation and ten percent delivery. So when you see the great speaker there or the great sales presenter in a small group, there is so much preparation that went before that and that's why they can make it look simple. And I also...

...say that delivery sits on structure, and so you've got to have a template, a structure, some kind of system so that you can organize your thoughts so that it sounds natural, it sounds conversational, but helps you get to the point. It looks easy. It should look easier than it actually is if it's done well, and so I'm big part of that, though, is confidence, right. So I have worked with people that are absolutely terrified to have to do and they would consider public speaking anything in like a large room. So if you ask them to come in and, say, address a global sales force, you know they start to, they start to shake, you see the sweats happen, you know. But a big chunk of that is confidence and as I was prepping for this interview I noticed that one of the bullet points on the stuff that you cent over was creating confidence. How women's sabotage communication in the workplace. And there's a couple. I mean that's a loaded a loaded statement. So I would love to understand that a little bit better for our audience. Yes, it is a loaded statement that I will tell you. When we had that title at one of the major corporations where their women's group, we had sixty sign ups within twenty minutes. So even though I got a lot of flak for the title, it drew a crowd. Here's what I've discovered. Women have some behaviors that are unique to them. It's not that men don't get nervous. They really do. In fact, I say they are two equalizers in life, money and public speaking. I don't think that men or women, or women are better presenters, but there are some unique things about women. And the reason I went there is because women have to prove themselves so much more than men, and so I start to examine what they do. So one of the things that I saw that women do that I don't see many men doing is the head tilt. In other words, when they're speaking, they tilt their head to one side and while that is a listening gesture, it's weak, because what afropologists tell us is that when an animal surrenders in the wild, it exposes...

...its neck. So subliminally your audience is picking up weakness, even though they may not be thinking about it consciously. So these are simple things. Stand there or sit there with your head straight up. That will make a difference in the impression of confidence. Another thing that I've seen women do that I don't see men do as much are use would be words or week speak, and when the words are words such as so hopefully I've tried to convince you and I feel that if maybe we get together, this could be benefit. Know what have you just said? And here's what's interesting. Where do you think these wimpy words start to creep in? In the sales process and the sales presentation? Right Up Front? Yeah, and also as they're closing, because they're the nervous Smith. Starts to happen when we have to ask for the sale. So it's what are the one people words and how can you substitute a more definitive term? So it's not if you die, it's when you die, or buy purchasing with us, use words that are more powerful or not tentative, just only those are words that modify and weaken your conviction. So when you are persuading, influencing, selling, you want to use stronger definitive language. When you're in a conflict, that's when you want to use softer tentative language. It's considerable. It's amazing right, if you think about it. You know, we've talked about how you set up a room, in the dynamics of how that impacts it. We've talked about physicality. You mentioned tilting the head. We're talking about linguistics essentially set in the structure word choice. So anybody out there who still thinks the public seek speaking as a saw skill, I hope you're paying attention because these are disciplines and approaches that that we can work on, that we can we can practice and today, I think you know, to for Diane's credit, I think it is...

...more critical today because we have less time to grab a people's attention convey critical information so being concise and targeted, I think, is always extremely affective. But it doesn't happen overnight. It just it's not something that you just going to walk into a room and be able to pull off. You really have to put in the time. Hence I'm assuming, then, why the book has been so successful and why your career has rocketed the way it has. Well, because what's been said about knockout presentations is it's a seminar in a book, or it's been called the Bible of public speaking, and that's exactly how I wrote it, so that if you can't be with me personally, you can take me with the book, because exercises and the tips and the DOS and don'ts of the ever at the end of every chapter. So it's almost like selfpaced learning. And I what's great is it has such rep we've had it in the colleges and in the CEA suite, so it really has something for everybody. But but you write about today, more than ever before, speaking is the new competitive edge. It absolutely is, and I say that because years ago, say ten or more years ago, a senior person could delegate down. Now they want to hear from you. So you can't avoid this skill. And the other thing that's different today is you have so many messages. Everything is commoditize. So even if you haven't, let's say, unique software that you are selling, it's a matter of time before your competitors can reproduce it. So what separates you from the pack is your presentation, and you hit it on it earlier when you said trust. That is what helps build trust, when you can convey a message, connect with the audience and get them to feel comfortable with you. That brings up a good point. So is there? They are there, tips, are tricks, Russian's Ash, and so I'll say best practices you would tell people that they could internalize that would help them maximize their persuasiveness or their ability to connect to...

...an audience. Yes, well, the first word that you said is connect, and I ask people to move from an eye contact to an eye connection. So I help them to really connect through the eyes with people so that they feel like you're really looking directly at them and with them a few other things too. In the most important thing is rapport it's the likability, and so when people like you and they feel that you are like in them, that's when the conversation starts to open and they begin to trust. So make them where they are. I think one of the mistakes is people try selling too quickly. So if they are a slow speaker, slow down your pace. If they are a high energy person, pick it up. What kind of language do they use? Do they seem to be a little formal or they folksy? When you start to match them and you enter their world, you are being a much better presenter in a sale. Professional okay, and so that's persuasiveness. Now we and I contact. I'm with you one hundred percent. I think that's some people struggle with that. I've also seen I don't know if you're familiar with Sangram Vajeri's see you or of terminus. He just had a I've had him on the podcast and we run in some of the same circles, but he was petrified of public speaking. I mean just to his own admission. I think he just put up a linkedin post about this, and he came up with this slow claps, like when comes out on stage there usually does it in a big room. It starts with a slow clap to get the audience clapping along with them. that he speeds it up and it starts, he feels starts to create some type of back and forth exchange or connection. So I contact is of is a physical approach. This slow clap is is kind of a physical approach as well. There are is there another one that you can think of that there are audience might relate to? Well, I I did see his video and I love that because if you're nervous, the best thing you can do is put the focus on the audience. So you're already engaged there with you. They're having fun and...

...now that takes the pressure off. But yes, who was it? Mark Victor Hanson, who wrote the Road Chicken Sup for the soul. Right. He speaks and he wants to underscore a point. will say to the audience, put your finger to your head. Now say that's interesting, and everybody does it. So they're engaged. Zig Zigler used to get on one knee on stage and there is less Brown, who uses a lot of energy as he walks on the stage and he'll say something like you got to be hungry, and so he tells his story and how he got to that MONTRUC and so that becomes part of the speech and people wait to hear that. There's Lisa Nichols, who's a motivational speaker and she uses the iwu technique. So when she wants to get people to embrace what she's saying and own it, she'll start with an eye statement. I do such and such. Then she'll say and so we blah, Blah Blah, and it ends up with you. And so by that point she's subliminally seated people to accept what she said because there she's now saying you. So those are some of the things that I've seen people do that help with the engagement and and you know now, and now we're adding. Now there's other techniques. Now there's physical techniques to connect to the audience. And I just go back to the you know, you mentioned structure earlier. Right, so you want to make sure you have a structure that supports you know your strengths and weaknesses as a presenter. Where I think, which is where I think, having a coach or working with someone like Diane Guys, if you're listening, is critical. Right. I have done it in the past. It is made the difference in my comfort level in front of a room, in front of customers, even in one on one interactions. There are things and techniques that can be used, but it is something that requires multiple, say, disciplines and mastery of them or progression in each of them to do effectively. How long just and this is I know totally not in my questions that I say or but I'm curious when...

...we're in sale. So I well, I just had to two questions. So I always hear people say Project Your Voice and I'm curious. I have never heard or seen a concise explanation of exactly how to do that. Well, it's through the breath and the the control of the abdominal muscles. So a lot of times people are are shallow breathers, and by that I mean if you ask an audience to take a deep breath, and I've tested this, they will raise their shoulders right from there. You know that they are not breathing deeply. So when you put your hands on your abdomen, and the audience people can do this now, one hand on the chest, one hand on the abdomen, and when you breathe in, your abdomen should expand. You should see your lower hand coming out and forward. So it's not been military sucking in, it's let it out. If you do that for a number of beats, will start to use those muscles and those are the muscles that allow a singer to hold note. Those are the muscles that allow someone to project, because when we try to project, a lot of times we're speaking from the throat and that doesn't get you very far. It's practice, it's a lot of practice, and so if you really have trouble with projection, you might want to work with a voice coach. But but it is very important to do that, because I've seen people will lose credibility because they're speaking too softly right well, and then people in the back of room are hearing you. You know as clearly in your group is getting different amounts of information, even though you're saying the same thing, based on just what they can hear exactly. I just had that experience yesterday. We were at a medical office and they were giving a presentation. There was a woman who it was smaller ten of us, but she was hard of hearing. So we asked the person to come to the middle of the room because she was not able to project. Excellent. So couple of tips that you could give...

...our listeners that would move the needle for them in their next conversation. I mean, we've mentioned a lot of stuff and I don't want anybody to think they have before they talk to another human being. Have to go work on all of these things. But if you could give them the know one or two tips that would actually move the needle in the next conversation, what would that be? I would say passion and trust connection. So first of all, being excited, because you don't have to have great skills if you are passionate and excited about what you do. And I could tell you stories about people who were flubbing and dropping papers, but they were so excited that people got caught up in it they hired them. So enthusiasm is contagious. And the other thing is trust. Don't talk about your product, talk about the audience that buy or talk about their problems. Get into a conversation and show that you can years. I would say passion, building trust by being listener centered and not speaker centered and by showing that you care. And also, third party endorsements are good. So he's say well, what people of my clients have told me in the past is a lot more powerful than to say I am good at this or my product will do this. I have a whole chapter, I think it's chapter seven, in knockout presentations, called listener centered communication, and it's a template for you to organize your thoughts in terms of the listeners point of view, starting with a Hook, and I will tell you when you get those telemarketers, I generally hang up on them. One time I didn't because the way he started was not hi, I want to talk to you about your electric costs, he said. Is this Diane Derresta? Yes, well, I'm from the Electric Company and I'm calling to let you know that you're paying. You paid too much on your bill. What? What? What month was this? This month? And now I'm figuring out what did I say? You pay, and then finally I realize he's trying to sell me on a another company. So that got my attention.

So do your homework and start with a hook. What does your listener care about? They don't care about your product or service. They don't care about you. They care about solving their problems and I know every salesperson has learned that, but we need the reinforcement. The challenge is, when you're in a presentation, how do you structure it so that it starts with what's important to that. We have attempt that for people. People want to do that. Yeah, your's view, are preaching to the choir on them. When we teach, you know, the the sales methodology that we teach them, work with with people on is completely about understanding the buyers perception of value. What do they think? He's important. So it's how do you ask those questions? And it is a it is almost a you know, you know, you said every you know, all sales people know this. It's almost common sense if you think about it. But the number of people that actually, when they're in the situation, practice it is slim. Like there's few. Right, you would think that it would be okay, I'm going to come in and I'm going to and I want to ask questions, I'm going to listen. But and the vast majority of people that try to sell the me or that we work with, we've trained them, in some cases in these organizations, all about the product. Our product. Is this, our product? Is that? Our product? Is this? A product does that? And now you want to go out and what happens? Well, they want to go out and they want to share that information. Slowing them down and having a structure to ask questions is his absolutely critical to success today. So if you guys haven't gotten it, get that, get the book, knockout presentations and check out that chapter. I've got another question for you, again not to just kind of add live in here. When we think about we know we've talked about structure and room control and breathing and language. There's all these elements to effective public speaking. What have you seen in terms of how long does it take someone who I don't want to say is petrified, but let's just say kind of a standard normal individual who's not real comfortable public speaking? How long have you seen or work with people to get them to a point where maybe they're not at the mastery level, but they're, you know, they're a heck of a lot more accomplished and comfortable? What...

...kind of journey does that look like? What kind of time does that take? Well, everybody's different, Chad, but I will tell you that I tell people I'm in the transformation business because I think you a two days seminar and see people move the needle and that's very exciting to me. It doesn't mean they have no fear, but they they stepped up and there they'll tell me I feel more confident and you can see it in them. I had one woman I had for one hour coaching sessions with her. I was a gift by her motherin law. She was a second year of law student and she was thinking of dropping out of law school because she was so afraid of speaking. And within four sessions she was feeling a lot more confident. And here's the thing. It's so much about mindset. It's mindset and skill set. You need both. But novousiness begins in the mind. So if you're very nervous, I know a couple of things about you. Number one, you're living in the future. You're thinking every everything. They can go wrong. Oh what if I trip? What if I lose my train of thought? What if we forget the benefits? So you need to come back to the here and now, which is the present, and that goes back to what you were saying. You're trained in product but what's your intention? If your intention is to sell, that's going to get you in trouble. If your intention is to understand the client and develop a relationship, you're going to be curious. So you want to have a curious mind. The other thing is if you are nervous, you are being self centered because you're thinking about me myself and I so get over yourself. It's about the audience. So what can you do for that prospect that by or that group, that audience, to make them feel more comfortable? What do they care about? And think I think of myself sometimes as a host and when people come into the room, I'm there early and I'm shaking hands and greeting them and talking to them, which is a great way to relax yourself, because now you feel like you've made a few contacts and use people's names. If you talk to...

...someone, you can reference something they said with their permission during your presentation. People love that. Excellent, excellent, all right. Last let's change your action a little bit here. We ask to standard questions at the end of each interview. The first is simply you're running your own business. That makes you a prospect for people that want to tell you things, and I'm curious. I always like to understand, you know, if somebody doesn't have a relationship or there's not a referral in, what do you find that people do to build credibility, to capture your attention. What works the best to get in front of you if somebody thinks they have, you know, a solution that's going to be beneficial for you or your team. Well, first, being authentic and, since sear so, not sounding sales A. So, for example, if somebody had said how would you like to lower your electric bill, I would have hung up right away. They said, oh no, you're over paying. It was a different thing. But I would say go to linked in, it's so much easier now, and see what you can find out, or go to their website. What can you find out about that person and reference it. And the best thing is when you find something of a personal nature, where you find an interest or a hobby or growing up someplace that you have in common. I would build on those kinds of things. And then you have to be able to get to the point pretty quickly. You don't want to waste people's time, so let them know what they're while you're calling who you are. Introduce Yourself, but find somewhere poor, and as soon as you do that it starts to switch. But it means that we need to do a lot more homework than we use to do. Right, excellent, okay, last question we call our acceleration inside. If there's one thing you could tell sales, marketing or professional services people, one piece of advice that, if they listened to, you believe would help them hit their targets or achieve their goals, what would it be? And why be listener centered and not speaker centered? I see this all the time in sales presentations, in any presentation, they start with their topic, they start with their product or service. Know, you want to be able...

...to start with what's important events. So always start with that hook or that benefit and tell stories. Storytelling is one of the most powerful selling and presentation skills because when people first come into a room, their guard is up. When you tell a story, the guard drops because they're now engaged and they're listening and you can say certain things and be much more powerful because people are coming to their own conclusions, because they're seeing themselves in their own issues in that story. So let them discover things through story. Sell don't tell excellent perfect day if the listeners interested in talking more about the topics. Today we're learning more about your services. What's the most efficient way to get in touch with you? My website, the rest Ofcom that's D as in, David I are as is and Sam teas and Thomas adrestacom excellent and I can't thank you enough for taking time to be on the show. It's been great having you. Thank you. Excellent. All right, everyone that does it for this episode. Please check us out to be to be REV exactcom you know the drill. Share with friends, families, Co workers. Write us a review on itunes so we know we're providing content that you enjoy. And until next time, we value selling associates, with you all nothing but the greatest success. You've been listening to the BB revenue executive experience. To ensure that you never miss an episode, subscribe to the show and Itunes or your favorite podcast player. Thank you so much for listening. Until next time.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (256)