The B2B Revenue Executive Experience
The B2B Revenue Executive Experience

Episode · 4 years ago

Matt Lockhart on Business Transformation: Pitfalls, Benefits, and the Cutting Edge

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Change is inevitable. Whether you’re working for a small business, or a company of forty thousand people, at some point you’re going to go through some sort of major organizational change.

On this episode of B2B Revenue Executive Experience, we were fortunate enough to sit down with Matt Lockhart, Executive Vice President at Magenic and chat about business transformation. It’s pitfalls, it’s benefits, and why it’s so important for companies to stay on the cutting edge.

You can find a breakdown of this episode here.

Today on the BDB revenue executive experience, we're speaking with Matt Lockhart from Magenic about business transformation, the pitfalls,benefits and why it's so important for companies to stay on the cutting edge.You're listening to the BDB revenue executive experience, a podcast dedicated to helping the executivestrain their sales and marketing teams to optimize growth. Whether you're looking fortechniques and strategies or tools and resources, you've come to the right place.Let's accelerate your growth in three, two one. Welcome everyone. I'm yourhost, Chad Sanderson, and today we're going to be tackling the topic ofbusiness transformation. It's one that shows up a lot in the press. We'rehearing a lot of people talk about it. Many of us probably know organizations thatare undergoing or tackling these types of transformative initiatives, and it's not necessarilyan easy thing to accomplish, especially when really just stay competitive. Today,you have to instill that acceptance of change and transformation into the DNA of thecompany. We're lucky enough to have with US Matt Lockhart, and executive fromMagenic, who's going to talk to us about how he's been enabling companies andMAGENIC has been enabling companies to do transformation in an successful way. We spendsome time talking about, you know, what really is transformation, why themarket and the industry has changed a bit and the need for it to bepart of the DNA is so critical. So, without further ADO, we'regoing to jump right into the interview with Matt. Matt, thanks for takingthe time and welcome to the show. Hey, it's great to be here, Chap. So we have a standard question we ask every guest at thebeginning of the show to talk about get to know you a little bit betterand talk about kind of a defining moment in your life or career that either, yeah, change the trajectory of where you were headed or gave you alesson you learn from. We'd love to have you share that with the guests. We get a better sense of who you are and where you came fromand where you're headed. Yeah, well, I appreciate that. It's it's it'sa little bit of a tough one because there's been a few. Butand and we'll focus on the defining a defining moment in career on the lifeside. I've got for daughter. So you can imagine. You can imaginewhat what what defines that, you know, on the career site. So I'vebeen with this firm for, you know, over two decades right andand, as you can imagine, I've seen quite a bit of change andone of the things that was, you know, really distinct is is wehad this sort of did very distributed regional model where it was almost as lowwe had sort of kind of franchise organizations out and about around the country andas a really a need to change to adapt to what our customers were lookingfor. You know, we really needed to get people working together and muchmore of a common and centralized model, and that included the development of someservices that are our regional branches needed to...

...take hold of. And so,you know, changing where everybody was, you know, kind of was ableto do a little bit of their own thing too. Much more of acommon, structured and value driven model was was was kind of one of thosedefining moments. Excellent so far. lesteners could give them a little bit ofbackground. O Magenic, and your roll there. Sure. So we area professional services firm that is focused on, you know, driving really disruptive andtransformational technology solutions. You know, so you can think of all ofthe new customer experiences that are being driven out of mobile platforms and or commonmobile the web platforms, and those are the things that we help our customersenvision and and think about and dream about and then, you know, bringto reality. And your role in the organization? Yeah, so I youknow, I again, I've been with the firm since we are all ofyou know, about eight people, and we've got around a thousand people now. And you know, my role is always been involved in in the growthof the business, either in, you know, growing markets and or growingcapabilities. Currently my role is the vice president of strategy and Business Development.Excellent, excellent. Today we wanted to focus on transformation, creating a transformationof culture, how it happens and and really what the business results can be. It's a big topic these days, right. There's no lack of approachesto it, but I'd love to get your kind of definition and context ofit for our listeners before we dive deeper. Yeah, you know, there I'msure all of all of us have been reading and seeing and in thepress and or the trade, trade, rags that, you know, everythingis all about transformation, as though this is a as though this is anew subject, and it's not. Changes Perpetual. You know, I thinkthat what we have seen more recently in the last well, shoot, probablythe last decade, is the pace of change and the pace of transformation isreally going faster than ever right and it is driven by our our digital cultureand, you know, by customers demand of advancement and in the services andand how we all interact. You know, there's an immediacy of things and andyou know, if you don't have the sort of the the next greatestexperience, or at least shoot an experience of this that is on par withsomebody else, it's so easy to change to you know, for customers toChange Age, who they're working with, and so that is really driven thisneed to for organizations to understand that.

Boy, you can't, you know, sort of set it and forget it anymore. You're constantly evolving and thosethose organizations that are, you know, improving at that and improving their capabilitiesaround transforming are those organizations that are winning today. Well, and you saidit, you know, it seems like everybody talks about like it's something new, but it's definitely mean something that's been going on forever. I'm curious,though. Have you noticed that it seems like things like customers want to movefaster than they did before? And is that, if I like I'm gettingolder? I won't say it, of your guests, a something I'm gettingall that we've been doing this a while. I'm noticing that perhaps my perception oftime is different and it just feels like customers want to move so fastthat they're not paying attention to the basics. Is that something you're seeing as well? Well? I think so. I you know. I think thatyou know. One of the other perspectives is that, you know, changeand transformation in the past was more of an inside out right mentality. It'slike somebody you know from the inside recognized and now it's much more of anoutside in where customers are demanding that that transformation and they're demanding it now,and so that is that is putting a different kind of time pressure on thingsnow. If it's reactionary, you know, that's where those you know decisions thatyou know sometimes are questionable and or you know they need to go backin and and and rethink them occur. If, if change is accepted andtransformation is accepted as a as a this sort of ongoing paradigm, you know, then I think it can be managed in those decisions are, you know, are better met to to the customer demand as well as the as theAbit, the organization's ability to to succeed. And as we were preparing for theshow and talking about the transformation and where it starts, you know,you mentioned really needing to understand the motivation to change as kind of the startingpoint. In your experience, what are some of the largest motivators you're seeingtoday for organizations to change it, and are they aware of of their ownmotivations to change? wories? It more reactionary than anything else? HMM.Well, I personally see both. Right, there's both positive as well as kindof negative incentives. There's the fear, wow, I'm really in trouble andI'm losing market share or I'm losing customers or etc. Etc. Oryou know, sometimes what we see is, in in some senses, kind ofthat irrational fear where they're going. Well, you know, look atwhat happened to blockbuster. They got disrupted and we could get disrupted to likethat. Yet they yet, they really...

...haven't gone out to the market andto their customers to understand what they want right. And then there's the sortof more positive things where those firms that have gotten closer to their customers,they are better understanding the experience, they're they're accepting the fact that, youknow, there's limitations that exist currently, but there's a you know, there'sa road maps and opportunities to to transform and really take hold of the valuesthat they've built up, the foundational capabilities and values that they have and andhave a nice, you know, long run and and and we've seen.Both of us have seen those transformation initiatives, you know, fail. A lotof them struggle to break down those silos or get closer to the customer. I'm curious in the work that you guys have done, have you seenany early key indicators for those types of initiatives that might indicate larger chance oflong term success? Yeah, it's interesting in a chat, I'm sure you'veseen, we all see the kind of trade ray exam or they the analystand and you know Gartner had this term the bimodal organization right and yet yet. You know, truly there is a need for vision and and obviously fundingand etcetera, it's Etera, which are really, you know, kind oftop level executive responsibilities. But what I've seen is that until you see themovement in that sort of grasp roots movement, some would say it's the volunteers thatreally drive change, because everybody's, you know, got their day joband or and or everybody's comfortable doing the things that they're doing today and orthey they see what they how they are, you know, what their firms ofvalues are, it's being just fine. But until people sort of get outon you know, get out on their skis a little bit and andget comfortable with trying things that are new. And what we've seen is is that'sreally happens at that cruise grass roots level. And so when you seepeople starting to kind of look around the corner and going hey, what's goingon there and I've got some thoughts and have you guys thought of doing this, and that really happens at that grassroots level and when you see those thingshappening, that is you know, that's a real positive indication that you're thatyou're down the track it was, and so organizations have to be able toget the entire entity over time to do embrace change right, to be willingto do it. Everybody scared to death of it. So I'm curious atan organizational level, have you seen things that companies are doing that are effectiveat helping the organization as a whole embrace change, or is it really thatdichotomy of we've got the funding in the vision and now we just need somevolunteers to kind of get the momentum going?...

Well? I think that there needsto be a recognition that it's that, you know, it's hard, right, that that there is failure. You know that common term of,you know, fail fast, but it there is some level of truth toit where you got to recognize that enabling this sort of organic transformation means thatyou're not quite exactly sure the path that you're going to be on. Imean it's going to there's going to be some bumps and there's going to besome wines and and and being okay with that and and you know, Ithink that there are another piece is is you're you know, the investment,and there's clearly investment in in dollars that enable it, but there needs tobe an investment in time, you know, in time equals money as well,where you're giving people the opportunity and you're giving them some space to trythings out. Now, you know, I had the opportunity to chat withan individual who was responsible for transformation at a organization, you know, asI mentioned, worth a thousand people and you know, I find it hardenough within our Organi but he's, you know, he's driving change across anorganization that is literally hundreds of thousands of people. And you know, thatblew my mind and I'm like, what in the world, how? How? It isn't? How don't you, you know, roll up into aball and start crying? What do you think about that? And he said, look, it happens, you know, one piece at a time. Soyou take one team and then the next team and the next team andthe next team, and so I think that you've got to break things upright and and some parts of the organization aren't going to be ready and somefunctions really don't need a level of change, but others, you know, othersdo. And and if that means creating, you know, transformation groupsor innovation groups to sort of light the fire then, you know, that'dbe one thing and or you just, you know, give more. Youknow some some groups and teams more freedom than others. And we were talkingabout, you know, constant intellectual curiosity, and curiosity's extremely powerful. I don'tknow if there was a report that came out of study that showed curiosity'sthe biggest thing that the human brain has to resolve and it's why you getI don't know which guys call a Minnesota, but look, you lose on thehighway, so there's a nasty accident on the other side of the road. You know, you have the potential to see some really horrible things,but your brain can't help but force you to look. And now, onan individual level, we tap into that in sales. But at an organizationallevel, how do you how do you instill that curiosity? Is it literallyone team at a time? And then you instill it, how do youmaintain it? Have you seen ways that organizations or people are being effective atthat? Yeah, boy, I you know, I think that if youcould, if you could bought all that, dad, really beyond to something,because I think that's challenging right is is you know, individually, weall have a different sort of level of...

...individual intellectual curiosity. But, youknow, I think that's a leadership thing really. I mean, you know, if leaders demonstrate that intellectual curiosity and and and they're there then celebrating itand you sort of see that propagated. Yeah, I mean, you know, as we were preparing our eyes, excuse me, as I was preparingfor in our chat today, I just came across this, you know,something from Mackenzie. There's there is no lack of an opportunity to learn.But you know, really propagating that, that mentality of Hey, look,you know, I want you to be smarter than me. As a matterof fact, you are smarter than me right. So don't look to me, you tell me, really know. And because those those people that areclosest, you know, closer to customers and and sort of see those opportunitiesto increase value or do something better that is going to create a better experience, those are your those are your opportunities for innovation and you know, learningfrom them is is is really some magic and it's one of those things thatI've I've always struggle with when we work with clients or, you know,teach sales, sales teams, that concept of that continual self improvement right.That I don't I don't typically call it curiosity and class, but that's whatwe're talking about. Like you need to constantly be the learning in order tobe able to engage with your buyers in the right way, to bring valueto the conversation. That takes time, it takes it takes an awareness anda willingness to do it and I just see so many sales reps that don'tdo it. They fall back to, Hey, this is a service weprovider, these are the features of functions. It's like take you loo take sometime understand how the entire landscape is going. Keep Educating Yourself, andI just I don't know how you instill that in the in the sales seemI think the leadership angles a great one. Maybe I should have sord a moretime with the sales leadership. Then then I have been but when welook at transformation, we've been looking at the organizational level. Let's look atjust sales and marketing for a second. Sure, absolutely, the buyer landscapeschanged. You know this. We've talked about this before, right. It'sjust gotten. It's got a little more demanding, especially in B Tob,because they're bringing their B Toc expert expectations to the B to be buying processright and they demand value. They want to be collaborated with. And sowhat, when it comes to just sales transformation or marketing transformation, are thehurdles for that specific type of organization different from your perspective than, say,the global organizational hurdles? And if they're, if they are different, you knowwhy do you think that is? Yeah, I think that it isprobably more challenging because you know you're dealing you you're really needing to align agreater group of stakeholders, and if it's in the context of transformation and changeright and and working differently and or meeting customers differently, then you've got abigger group of stakeholders who really have their...

...ideas in mind and you're needing tomeet those stakeholders with your own organizations. You know stakeholders, and so there'sjust a greater degree of adaptability. You know that that is needed and Ithink that going back to, you know, sort of that last subject that wewere talking about and you go, well, how do you meet that? Well, you got to know your customers better than ever. Right,and you got and that takes that again. That's that uptick in curiosity, right, that that can give you know, an individual salesperson the leg up oversomebody else. Right. So you know, if they know that customers, how they think? Right, how they you know how they have thoughttraditionally. You know what they're you know what their values and or gaps arein the market place. Well, they're in a much better position to facilitatea discussion. And it's not, you know, we know this chat.It's not. You know, it's not pitching and pray and it's it's not. It's not throwing up on a white board that succeeds anymore. Right,it is. It's facilitating a discussion and being part of that discussion and andthen having values, right, and you know value you either from services orproducts that that are, you know, part and parcel to that discussion.I'm totally still in the pitch and prey. I've I hadn't heard that in avery long time, so I'm going to bring that one back. Thatvery easy. Hey, it still holds true, right, it does.It doesn't mean you see a lot of sales reps and sales. You know, revenue exacts are all about the now, because that's you know, they're ownthe numbers, they got quotas, they got a hit and some ofthis is a little bit more nuanced, I think, than it used tobe, just because of the education level of the customers. And I don'tknow, you know, I've seen a lot of sales reps, a lotof more can people fall back on? Well, Hey, I know Idrink the Koolaid when I do my onboarding and I love the company I workfor and everybody should love it. And that switch to, you know,really trying to look at things from the buyers perspective. You know, saleshas been struggling with this for years and I think today it becomes even morecritical in order to have that type of collaborative interaction with your customers. AndI'm not a hundred percent sure that most sales exacts have totally embrace that orrealized realize the importance of that. You still see kind of that sprint forthe goal line type of mentality which, yes, we got to produce anumbers, that's what sales is there for. But I think the way it happensand if they really want to get transformative in their sales organizations, they'regoing to have to look at the way their organization is perceived by the buyersthey're interacting with. It's like fair perspective. Oh, I think so. Imean I you know, it's great and we, you know, welove our our team members who have, you know, a great deal,you know, Spirit and passion for our capabilities and you know that's that's critical, right, because you got to get up and and still hear a lotof knows every day. But that's you know, that's that's part of thethat's part of the deal. But combining,...

...you know, we talk a littlebit internally about, you know, working with those customers that get itright, the get up, that get us and real get them and andyou see the opportunity and you know, obviously in a services organization, Ithink that's that's inherently more valuable because, you know, ultimately it's a you'recreating value out of intangibles and and so, you know, building those bridges withwith customers where their shared values, where their shared vision. Well,in order to in order to see that, boy, your you better increase yourcollaborative game and and and increase your investment in your customers so that sothat you can help them see right that that there's an opportunity to to create, you know, really cool things through the combination of you know, yourvalues and their imagine. Your board sets a target of twenty percent revenue growthin eighteen months. So something will have to change with your sales team.How do you beat your target? Value Prime Solutions can help ensure your manmanagers and reps are leveraging a sales framework that focuses on value, not price. Don't assume you have it all figured out. Don't wait until it's toolate. Visit Value Prime Solutionscom and let them help. Alignment is critical,I think, even internally as they're working on transformation, breaking down those silosand creating creating better alignment internally, and I think it's just as critical tocreate it with the customers. Now I'm Magenic. You guys. Have youbeen growing? I have a great reputation, especially in a market. You know, I spent the last ten years in that market, especially in themarket that was going through consolidation and all types of things. So I'm kindof curious what strategies and tactics have you developed or found that you would adviseother revenue executives to employ to inspire the type of sales behavior and change thathas been successful for you guys have Magenic? Yeah, well, I mean Ithink that this kind of goes back to what we're talking about earlier is, you know, having a healthy sense of paranoia that you are your you'realways fallen behind it in terms of your capabilities and or your approaches with customersand and and so you know, constantly, you know, looking for opportunities toimprove. And either that can be in your service models, that canbe in your capabilities, that can be in your products. Right, forproduct development firms, you know they are. They have been constantly improving, youknow, and those that don't won't go away. And so, youknow, I think that the key for for you know, revenue executives isis to recognize that they've got a role in that. Right again, becausethey're closest to the customers and you know, those revenue executives that that recognize thatthat change piece is hard and an...

...invest in it right and and really, you know, make that part of their problem are, you know,are the most successful in those that that kind of are always looking back andgoing, where's my new stuff? Right, what are you? You know,hey, I don't have something. You know, then you know they'renot they're not buying into their opportunity to affect transformation and just out of curiosity. So we've seen. I was I was talking to a Gabl arson frominside sales and we were talking about the rise, kind of the rise,of the crow role and how it seems to be kind of a combination ofthat sales and marketing in an attempt to, I don't know, understand or getcloser to the buyer and infuse that inside of their organizations. Be Realcurious to hear your take on that role, that chief revenue officer roll, andkind of where you've seen it be the most successful and what it lookslike. HMM. Well, other than, you know, a sales guys,traditionally I've had a hard time with anything called chief right, right,there's always that that dry but no, I mean it. You know,that traditional challenge or or sort of gap between sales and marketing is has alwaysexisted, right, because there's a human factor right of of sales that thatreally needs to be taken into account and, you know, the greatest product orservice with the greatest message. If, if, if you can't enable thatconnection between, you know, that salesperson or the revenue individual and thecustomer, if that connection can't happen, even though it's the greatest product andservice with the greatest message, well the you know, then it's off ornot right. So so as I think it's it's it's sort of bringing intothe day to day reality that, you know, it's it is a toughjob to sell. It's a tougher job now to sell in technology and services. Then then I think it ever has been. And you know, bringingthat human factor is, I think, is a key opportunity of that.Chief Revenue Officer, excellent. So so let's pivot here a little bit andtalk more a little bit more specifically about Magenic. Can you help our audienceunderstand, because you guys are a large services organization, how you guys haveeffectively structured the sales and marketing team? Yeah, sure, I mean so. You know, like many, we've got our feet on the street withinour rate regional sales organizations and and you know sales and you know what wecall our delivery leadership organization. So these are these are all the individuals whoour closest to customers. And so, you know, we've got our senioraccount executives that are out in in our you know, field, regional locations, and then they're supported by in an inside, you know, sales andsupport organization that is able to walk, you know, work across the youknow, across our target markets and and...

...you know where there's heat and ordriving campaigns and or, you know, if some organizations need a little bitmore assistance, there there to you know, back up and support them. Andand then, you know, constantly looking to evolve those channels that thethat the sales organizations are able to work through, either you know, partnerchannels and or, you know, sort of strategic marketing channels. Excellent.And as you guys continue to focus on growth for Magenic, what would yousay, end of this year and going into two thousand and eighteen, isyour largest business issue? Well, I think that it's. It's it's alot of the things that we've talked about, but time right is, I thinking. For us and for for many firms, that's the that's the biggestchallenge. Where to go fast and, you know, really put yea,put the pedal to the metal and and we're not to write because your investmentsaren't equal and in different areas. And so I think that managing a managingthat transformation and and the time that's necessary. I think those are those are someof the biggest things that that we continue to work on. And whenyou look back over the last say, twelve, the eighteen months, andI mean because you know, we talked about this before, it's a constantchange, it's a constant evolution. But when you look back at the Organizationof last twelve, eighteen months, what are you the most proud of thatMagenic has been able to accomplish or or achieve in that time? You know, I it's I've again, I've been with the firm for twenty one yearsand it's it's the same answer. You could you could have asked me thiseighteen years ago and and it was, you know, we had a distinctopportunity where, you know, we were you know, we were really lookedat by the customer to to think about how they could be different in theirmarketplace and you know, we went through some innovation cycles and and we reallyenabled the company to look and see themselves differently, you know, their productsdifferently, and to their customers. And you know, I can remember,you know, one of our team members had she passed along an email inwhich the customers said look, you know, I view you guys as a partnerin my organization and so to see the you know, the eyes,you know, go wide, you know, with our customers and with our teammembers, you know, working together and haven't having a great time and, you know, doing some great things. That's you know, that's that's prettycool, excellent and it's totally off the wall. Questions based on somethingthat talking my memory here. Do you...

...guys ever do competitive win loss likehave an outside firm call your customers that you won and interview them or thecustomers that you've lost to get kind of that unbiased third party collection of informations? That's something you guys have ever engaged in? Yeah, we have.You know, we quite honestly, we probably don't do it enough, butyeah, because I think that this is something that could be done, youknow, really every year because you learn so much, but we probably it'sprobably every three years or so that we do it and and I do thinkthat it's really important to get that outside or involved so you're, you know, sort of getting that independent, unbiased, you know, feedback. And youknow, the last time that we did there were some things that hurta little bit right because how we viewed ourselves and how, you know,some of some of our customers viewed us was was a little different and andit really did set up the the opportunity for us to to then go okay, well, Hey, you know, we can make improvements. We can, you know, we can, we can be better and we can bedifferent. And and that doesn't mean that what we're doing today is bad,because what we're doing today is great. But you can always, you canalways approach your customers in a better fashion and or do more for them,and I think that's what you really learn and it you know, forces,you know forces, they the leaders and the executives to you know, tobe open and and really can. I think what we've seen is that itreally does spark that that opportunity for transformation. It was always such an interesting toolwhen I was running sales teams especially. I mean the organization is a whole. You have some exacts that would would believe what they were reading orhearing and some that would you know, not differing levels of violence in theirreaction depending on what was being said. But it became one of the mosteffective tools in debriefing sales reps that had lost deals. And you're right,it's uncomfortable. I remember the first time I went through one. It's notfun. I mean you you just you're basically getting told everything you did wrongand if you're not in the right mindset to accept that and internalize that andthen implement the behavioral change as an individual, you know, you know you're givenan opportunity to succeed here with the feedback and if you can approach itthe right way, I think it can really contribute to success. I justcurious if it was curious if you guys had run into that or used itbefore. So I appreciate well and it and enables, if you don't enablethat, that sort of culture of openness right. And and none of us, I was all of this, you know, completely figured out. Thenyou know then it can be kind of an ugly thing, but I don'tknow what you've seen. The other side of the that is is that there'sa there's a there's a number of team members, you know, once thereports come in and they kind of look back and they go, I toldyou so, I telling you this for...

...a little while. Yeah, soit's fun to see that as well. It's like any relationship. You know, my wife's always like so, I just told you that for three weeksand you weren't listening to me and you ask your buddy and now all ofa sudden it's real. Yeah, he say, you told me what?Yeah, what? I wasn't oh. So now we're back to talking aboutmy selective listening. Okay, exactly. All right, so let's Change Directionalbit here. I ask all of our guests kind of two standard questions towardsthe end of each show. The first is simply that you are as arevenue executive, you are not to put to find a put out, butyour target, your prospect for sales professionalism. We spend a lot of time workingwith companies to help them be able to get in front of people likeyourself to sell their things. So I'm curious when somebody's trying to sell toyou, somebody that you don't know, and they're trying to get your attentionbuild credibility, what grabs your attention? What helps them build that credibility andand perhaps get that first meeting? Well, I don't know about you, Chad, but for me that relationship thing. Me, you know, that reallymatters. And so because we, you know, we do get hita lot and when we get hit, we're getting hit from all directions,and so, you know, we get really good at putting that filter onand are my out. None of this matters, right. But when youknow, when a friend or a trusted associate or a colleague says Hey,Matt, you know, I know you well enough to know that this,this is something that you might want to give, you know, ten minutesto boy, that that really does matter. And so finding, you know,it's sort of like, you know, one of those Maze Games, andand finding the path where you know you can build, build that relationship, you know, through somebody or through a connection. I think that,at least for me, that's that's really important. Excellent, excellent. Solast question we ask is for an acceleration in sight. So if you're thinkingabout sales and marketing professionals, you could give them one piece of advice thatyou think would make them more effective, more able to hit their targets andsucceed. What would that be in why? Well, I mean I think thatyou know, I personally. We talked about this, I think,when we're together last yeah, that you can't you can't teach hard work andthat's always got to be there. But if you incorporate some of that,that constant learning, and you know, and the one thing that I wouldencourage is is boy, read something new every day. Read one new thingevery day. It doesn't take long, you know, get up in themorning and spend ten minutes read something new and then, you know, writea note or two about it, right and and then all of a suddenit becomes, you know, part of you and part of your repertoire andand you're more insightful, you're more interesting and more people are going to wantto spend time with you. Perfect matter...

...for listeners interested in talking more aboutthe topics we touched on today. What's the best way to get in touchwith you? Yeah, absolutely, and love to. You know, II'm in constant learning. Then that comes, you know, more through people anddialogs like this then than anything else. But you know, Madelmattl at MagenicM age and I Secom Excellent. Well, I can't thank you enoughfor the time day. It's been great having it on the show. Hey, really appreciate the opportunity to chant. All right, everyone that does itfor this episode. Please check us out at be to be REV exaccom.Share the episode with your friends, Family's co workers. If you like whatyou here, drop us a review on itunes. We do use those todetermine what types of guests we bring on for you guys to listen to.And until next time, we have value prime solutions. With you all.Nothing but the greatest success. You've been listening to the BB revenue executive experience. To ensure that you never miss an episode, subscribe to the show andItunes for your favorite podcast player. Thank you so much for listening. Untilnext time,.

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