The B2B Revenue Executive Experience
The B2B Revenue Executive Experience

Episode · 4 years ago

Mark Hunter on Barriers to Better Prospecting

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

We wanted to kick off 2018 by talking about something on the top of everybody’s mind as they plan out the new year – prospecting. Time and time again, prospecting is ranked as the highest priority among sales professionals.

Mark Hunter, “The Sales Hunter,” and author of High-Profit Prospecting and High-Profit Selling, joined us to discuss how to overcome the challenges of prospecting and what techniques are most effective for success.

You were listening to the BB revenueexecutive experience, a podcast dedicated to helping the executives train their sales and marketingteams to optimize growth. Whether you're looking for techniques and strategies or tools andresources, you've come to the right place. Let's accelerate your growth in three,two, one. Welcome to the B Tob Revenue Executive experience everyone,and welcome to two thousand and eighteen. Hard to believe another year has passedus by, hoping that many of you achieved, if not exceeded, yourquotas, that if you're a sales executive or revenue executive out there, youfound two thousand and seventeen to be an extremely positive year. Even in achanging in dynamic business, political cultural environment, two thousand and eighteen promises to bringits own set of challenges. No doubt they'll be a lot of ustalking about the newest, latest greatest things in sales and marketing professions out thereand attempt to help you be more effective and make two thousand and eighteen abanner year. I want to welcome everyone to two thousand and eighteen. Iwant to thank everyone who's been listening through two thousand and seventeen, as westarted this podcast. Two Thousand and eighteen, we're going to continue the good work, continue to have a great lineup of guests provide you insight into thingsthat we believe will make you more effective at sales and marketing. And tothat end, we're going to start this year with an episode with a wellregarded thought leader, Mark Hunter, and we're going to talk about prospecting.It's a great way to kick off the year. You don't want to getbehind on filling that funnel and filling that pipeline. Mark was kind enough tospend some time with us towards the end of two thousand and seventeen so thatwe could put this episode together and launch our podcasts in two thousand and eighteenwith a well respected guest and some great insights for everybody. So again,welcome to two thousand and eighteen. Hope everyone had a great holiday and withoutfurther ado, let's jump into the episode with Mark. Today we're talking aboutbarriers to better prospecting and to help us do that, we are lucky tohave with US Mark Hunter, Aka the sales hunter, also author of highprofit prospecting and high profits selling books that I highly recommend. If you havenot picked up run out and do it right now. It will change theway you look at the game of sales and prospecting. Mark, I wantto thank you very much for taking the time and welcome to the show.Thank you for having me on today. So we like to start with aquestion to help our listeners get to know you a little bit better. Wekind of change it up from time to time, and so if you couldgo back in time and tell your younger sales self one thing, what wouldit be? And why listen to older people? I mean, I hateto say this, but you know what's funny is is we jump into salesand we think we have all the answers to it and it's amazing. There'sreally no such thing as anything new in sales. It just matter with thespin that you put on it. So I think ability to really I thinkthat's what makes podcasting pot cash so critical, because eat you gain this expertise ofother people. So yeah, you really I would go back and Iwould listen to people who would walk the...

...road before me and not try toreinvent the wheel. And then I tell you what, if you'd gone backand told my younger self that. I'm pretty sure my younger self wouldn't havelistened. All doubt. There's no way I would listen. I would havesaid about hen sor right. So let's talk prospecting. Hot Topic is alwaysright. The latest stats from from serious decisions and others have this as thetop priority for sales executives. Now, this isn't new, just like there'snothing new in sales. Prospecting is always a hot topic. Everybody wants more, you know, leads in the top of the funnel. They want moreconversations. So, from your perspective, you know, what are the selfinflicted challenges that sales people create that damage their prospecting effectiveness, thinking there's anAPP that'll do all the prospecting for them. Yeah, I mean, everybody's lookingfor this the silver bullet, this tool, and everybody gets caught upchasing silver bullets and stupid stuff. And you know, a lot of thingshaven't changed about prospecting. It's still engaging the customer and and in fact,all I kind of counter the argument it's all about getting leads. I couldcare less about leads. I want quality prospects. I'm really into quality versusquantity. These people who sit there and say, Oh, I'm going toget you tenzero leads, I'm going to get you to know what you canto do is you're going to give me ten thousand names. I don't wanttenzero anything. I want, I want, I want, you know, tenpeople are going to buy. Well, and then and you and you lookat that, right, and all that does is if they're going togive you tenzero names, it is it creates a glut of things you haveto go through. Well, that, Hey, get what I'm gonna I'mgonna jump in right. That's a huge piece, because what happens is peoplespend so much their time managing the top into the funnel that they don't haveany time to manage the bottom end. Excuse me, isn't the bottom endwhere you make your money? Right, right, I mean, they getso people get so caught up chasing the nurturing. I if I hear leadnurturing one more time, I think I'm going to vomit. I mean,I mean, okay, I'm sorry, we're getting really cold and crass herereal quickly. Well now, but I mean it's true, right you,the goal is to identify those people that are most likely to buy and movethem as quickly as possible through the funnel. And Plain and simple, I meanit's not there's no black magic to it, right. I mean it'ssales, one hundred and one. It's been that way forever, continues tobe that way. And so when you work with clients, you know,what do you propose as a best practice approach for prospecting? And I don'twant to spoil any of the books, but at a high level, howdo you provide the right context for effective prospecting to the clients that you workwith? Let's not spoil a book, but I'll just tell that just I'lljust tell you the secret. But don't tell him. I won't tell anyit's just you don't want to, don't. It's just you and I on thispunt, this podcast. Yeah, he really comes down to it's notabout the number. Like I said earlier, what you want to do is youwant to be able to qualify fast. Everybody starts out as a lead.They don't become a prospect, they become a suspect. You have toearn your way out of the suspect of village, out of the suspect prison. What does this mean? I got to be willing to ask tougher questionsearlier on. Two many times, what...

...happens is people will sit there andthey look for reasons to keep somebody in their sales funnel. Okay, salesmanagers, are you listening that? I'm going to get very blunt with you. You are causing much of this problem because you want people to have fullfat sales pipelines. Well, what do they do? They fill it upwith junk just to keep you happy. I don't want to filled up withjump I want I want to be able to have prospects in there that I'vebeen able to qualify fast, so I'm not wasting my time with people whojust have heartbeats because, you know, it's interesting. My dog is gota heartbeat, but my dog is not going to buy anything from me.I got to get serious and this. People aren't willing to ask tough questionsup if I can't uncover what is the true need, what's the true outcomethat you're looking for early on in my prospecting conversation with you, then youare not a prospect, you're a suspect and you're not going to be aprospect until I know what your critical need is, what your critical outcome is, because have you found? Have you found there to be really, reallyeffective questions that you can ask repeatedly, or were structures for those questions thatallow you to qualify them out faster? Yeah, you know, you knowwhat the the magic is. It's not the question you ask, it's thefollow up question. You asked what they shared with you. This is whatI find so interesting when we are prospecting. We asked this question and then theyrespond back and okay, now I go to question number two, thenI go to question number three. Oh, shut up, stop it playful.You're choking the prospect. What you want to do is just get onequestion. Let let the let that lead. Okay, I'm just going to callthem the lead right now. Talk. Let them, let them share.This can even be in an email or whatever, but but I thenit's the follow it's the follow up question. It's the followup question and the followup question it is this is written, this is this is going to bea powerful statement. Short questions get you long answers. Think about us. You just ask. Why? Can you tell me more? Can youexplain that? A little better. Could you give me another example? Couldyou share that with me again? And it's just to get them because here, here's only one of the most amazing things is that there's this perception outthere that sells people don't listen. Yes, with the that's majority of sells people. Yeah, so it really is. It's just it. I just wantyou, the salesperson, to be listening, listening, shut up andand I know that that that's hard. That's hard for sales people because wehave all the answers. We went to sales school. Oh, wow,W U S to. Okay, I'm sorry, I'm getting a little bitblunt here, but yeah, I think we need to. Let's start offthe new year by being blunt, right, let's let's let's get our act together. Yeah, let's stop. Let's...

...stop, you know, let's let'sstop kidding ourselves. Right. And I spent a lot of time with clientsto and it's I spend so much time trying to convince them. Look,stop looking for a silver bullet. There isn't silver bullet. You need tolisten, you need to engage right, you need to ask the right questionand I love that shorter answers get you longer or shorter questions get you longeranswers. I love that. I'M gonna yeah, I'll attributed to you,but I'm hey stealing. You can steal that. You can see it allI want, because the the inverse is all it is true to long questionsget your short answers. salespeople are are notorious for asking this big fat longquestion because they want to demonstrate how brilliant did they are, and then,and then the person on the other line just goes huh, they can't figureit out. I mean they know because short question. It really sales isnot. You know, it's kind of funny if you really stop meaning aboutit. What are we having right here? We're having a conversation. We're havinga conversation, and that's really what sales is all about. It's nota presentation, it's not a checklist of things, it's a conversation and theconversation goes much better when you allow it. I had, I don't want tosay free form, because you know where you want to go as asalesperson, but you're allowing the customer that that other person, the prospect,the suspect, the lead, whatever you want to call. You're letting themfeel like they're driving, and in essence, you they are, because they're theones that have to take you to the outcome that they're looking for.You you can't. You don't know what the outcome is that they're looking forbecause you haven't talked to them. So you let them, let them driveand they'll take you to it. And, Oh, by the way, youcan let your purse just like we're doing. Let your personality come through, and it's amazing how much more comfortable the conversation be comes sales is akick in the pant. Prospecting is a kick in the pants because you're helpingto show people. You're helping people see and achieve what they didn't think waspossible. To me, that's a kick in the pants. I love it. Well, it's a lot I mean, it's a lot of fun. Right. It's that it's that natural curiosity of what kind of problems are youwrestling with and what do you think the solution is? Let's talk about that. Where do you where do you want to go? How do you wantto solve it? I think that natural curiosity that some of the ultrahigh reformersI've worked with have as one of their biggest assets. Right, because italso, if that curiosity is strong enough, it helps them stop talking and startlistening, which is, as you said, one of the biggest challenges. You See, what sales Reps. I was guilty of it when Iwas an individual contributor. Wet Behind the ears to write, I thought Ihad all the answers. What don't really matter what I think the answers are. It's more about what the person I'm talking to thinks the answers are.So how do I figure that out? Yeah, spot on. And sowhen we talk about when we look at prospecting and you think about the effectivenessof coaching people in their prospecting, why do you think reps that are willingto embrace a coach are more effective than those that aren't? Well, youknow, it's funny. I've never seen a super bowl team when a gamewithout having coaches on the sideline. I...

...mean, I mean, you know, you really stop and think about that, I mean have you ever seen?Have you ever seen a a super bowl champion? All, we don'thave coaches on our team, or an NBA champion or, I don't care, high school base. But it doesn't matter what it is. Their coach. Great people are always open and willing to receive input in direction. Andbesides, it's also a flat out kick in the butt, because coaches holdyou accountable. And the biggest challenge I think people have in prospecting is twothings. A, they failed ask enough questions and they fail to adhere tothat critical word that is found on every bottle of shampoo. Repeat, right, yeah, I mean without doubt. I mean, oh well, Icalled them. I called him in two thousand and sixteen. I called himin two thousand and seventeen. I'll put them down on my calendar. CalledHim in October of two thousand and eighteen. Guess what, cowboy, you're notgoing to be close in many sales and coaches will hold you accountable andget you into that cadence. Get you into that cadence. And the caseis is going to vary upon the industry, you're in, your sales cycle,you're set. You know all these various factors, but it may beas frequently is once a week. You got to be getting cut. Itmight be once every two weeks, it might be once a month. Again, every site, and you know I work with some businesses where the cadenceis every day, literally every day, they're calling certain people every day becausethey're in such a frequent purchasing habit pattern. But again, you create the patternand the coach is going to help you. Because here's the whole thing, left to our own accord, the reason we're all in sales is becausewe couldn't get a regular job. WHOA, Oh, Whoa, Whoa, holdon, hold on, hold on. No, no, not that.That's what a lot of people think. See, a lot of people thinkwe got into sales because we couldn't hold a radar job because we're toooh, we can't get structured. where we we chase the shiny object allas her suff to certain agree. It's a little bit true with all ofus. And a coach is going to keep us tight, keep us focused. And so we mentioned the managers being a challenge earlier. And so whenyou work with managers and they want to get better at coaching, is therea technique or an approach you coach the managers on to be better coaches?Yeah, shocking statement. Number thirty eight managers. Managers. You can't motivateanybody. You can't. Well, nobody can motivate anybody. All you cando is create an environment for your people to motivate themselves. And Stop andthink about that, and that, to me, is a very refreshing whatthis means is that you, as a manager, have to do two things. One, you have to create a winning culture in your organization. AndI tell you what, when I mean a winning culture, means it's gotto be a positive place to come to work. And your people are not. They don't, they don't get excited...

...by the same things you get excitedabout. So get over get over that one. What it means is thatLou Holtz, football coach, Notre Dame, South Carolina, Minnesota, Arkansas,failed with the New York jets, but anyway, great motivator. Hewas asked how do you motivate a team and he says I motivated a hundredten different ways, meaning he had a hundred ten different scene. Because whatis he saying? He's got to know really what, what trips the triggerof each individual person. See, so, as a manager, not this doesnot mean that you, Oh, I'm going to hold this person upona pedestal in this personal no, no, no. But what that means isthat the goals each person has is going to be different and you betterfind out what those are. And, Oh, by the way, thosearen't just their professional goals, is their personal goals. WHOA, yeah,that's right, that's right. You know what's interesting? You would they can'tseparate work from outside life. I mean it did to just the two blendingtogether. If you're having allowsy day at work, guess what, you're goingto carry it home with you. If you're having a lowsy night at home, guess what, you're going to carry it to work the next day.So the good manager, and I all hate the term manager because I'd readyuse term leader, is really creating environment for you, the employee, todo your best. So and so it really comes down to that's the soholething. Don't chase false metrics. Don't be a spreadsheet jockey, don't bea dashboard junkie. You know, I see these people at all they dois they manage the spreadsheet or they manage the they got sales forces, ceeare and what's the dashboard saying? So forth. It just because it's justbecause we can measure it, doesn't mean it's something you should be caring about. WHOA. What did he APP because here's the whole thing. I canlook at all the leads that come in to the top. Okay, that'sgreat, but I don't take leads to the bank. I take what comesout the bottom to the bank. You see, that's where I focus in. And while Gee, they had six phone calls with their customer state,well fine, but what was the critical question? What? What? What? Here's the quite. Here's the question I want. I want every man, every sales leader, to ask their people every day. What did youlearn today? What did you learn to say, and how are you goingto use it tomorrow? If you get that habit of asking your people thatquestion every day, it's amazing the impact it will have. They hang upthe phone, you know, they you you. They come back from asales call, whenever ask him hate. What did you learn? What's goingto be the pet what's gonna be the critical insight that you're going to useto follow up with them? You really coach people by asking them questions,because really what you want to do is you want to create an environment andwhere they're really coaching themselves. And then you just keep raising the bar,raising the bar, raising the bar. Well, I mean it helps themthrough the act of Selfdiscovery, right, the questions help them. It's aless it's a less brutal way, right, you're not going to force somebody todo something. So, but if you can engage a much likely prospects, if you can engage people that you're...

...leading in conversation and dialog and Selfdiscoveryin a guided way, they have a tendency to get where you wanted togo faster than telling them where they need to be. HMM, yeah,excellent lot. So with the with prospecting, let's talk for a second about socialselling. Right. That was the big buzz word end of last year, middle of last year. Every is, oh, it's all about social selling, it's all about social selling. I'm kind of curious to hear whatyour perspectives on on that little buzz word and potential silver bullet, some peoplethought. Kind of curious to hear what you think about social selling in therole at plays in prospecting. Yeah, well, let me tell you something. I don't know where you bank at, but my bank does not accept clicksand likes and fears. Okay, I was just it. Just doesn'tyou know? My bank takes dollars and sense, and I see a lotof people. They I get people call me all time. Really spend xamount of money on this. So yeah, well, you got a bunch ofclicks and likes, but you can't. He's like, at fact, youcan tweak this, you can tweet this Hashtag. Social Selling Without SocialCommunity is social stupidity. Think about that. My whole objective in social selling isnot to get clicks and likes. My whole objective is to have anonline relationship on an online contact that I turn into an offline conversation. Now, what does this mean? Means I connected with somebody online. In fact, I would say you and I probably met by way of Linkedin or somethinglike that. Probably you know, and that in turn went to an offlineconversation. See, that's that's where social selling, and I hate I reallycaught. I really call I really call it social marketing, because really,what you're doing it is you're creating. You have to be on social media. You got to create an awareness, you got to create a billboard,you got to create a equity in your name. But don't kid yourself.Not Everybody is out there on social media. I know people who are responsible forbillions of dollars a year in in buying decisions and they're not on socialmedia because they don't want to be bug by sales people. Social Selling givesyou a window on the world, but Oh, that window may only looknorth and east, it doesn't look south and West. So what you're doingis you're saying, Oh, okay, I'm going to go ahead and giveup fifty percent on my market place. I deal in a lot of industrieswhere people look at you and go, you know, if you say socialmedia, they go, yeah, my kids are on facebook, or yeah, pinterest or something like that. So don't these are these are a lot. I meant. This is going to get me in trouble because because Ilike some of these people. But there's a lot of CHARLOTTEAN's out there willingto take your money. To tell you that social selling because again, see, it's a metric you can measure. I'm going to help you get tenzeromore likes or tenzero more followers and so forth. But but that's a metric. But is it a meaningful metric? No, okay, I'm sorry,I'll stop my ran. Well, no,...

...no, I think it's a greatpoint. I think I mean especially the point about you know, you, if you just are focus on social selling, you're totally limiting your availablemarket because there are a lot of they're probably more people. We may begetting to a tipping point, but some of the industries that I've worked innobody masses social right, right, but social social selling is one of thetools in your tool box. But next time I have a palmber coming tomy house, I don't want the plummer walking in my house, which justa pair of pliers. I want them coming in with that big fat toolbox and a big honk and truck outside. We're all kinds of stuff in there. I want to use all the tools. And so if we lookat okay, across social selling, obviously, well, the next obvious question wouldbe so let's talk about the phone for a second, because there's thewhole debate about, oh, cold callings dead or the phone doesn't work ornobody answers the phone anymore. I'm kind of curious. Let's parallel that perspectivewith a social selling Oh, so you're asking me does does the phone evenwork? So you're so you are asking me that trick question. Have youstopped beating your wife? Yes, yeah, yeah, I mean the telephone worksgreat, it at you know what's funny, there are so few peopleusing the telephone that it works even better. Now I'm a mate. I'm amazedat how people are just afraid to pick up the phone and call.But you know what I it's just it's just a conversation. There's nothing Ilove and it. And then, oh, cold cold calling. Who? Well, come on, that's like it's like saying defying air. I meanthey're first of all depending, depending on there's so many factors that that comeinto play. Your industry, sales cycle, Etcentra, etc. I say,you know, there are some people who, in a very short salcycle, work cold calling simply works. Works, fine, works, great, I don't need most people are in a little more about defined longer cellcycle and there's so much information out on the Internet. Don't tell me thatyou can't come up with one little piece of information about thirty seconds or aminute that you can't use as your lead in for the phone call you're aboutto make. I mean so I wouldn't call it cold calling, I'd callit lukewarm calling, but it works. I I do it still to thisday. And I get a kick out of it. Well, it's funnywhen I was working with a client the UK and one of the younger Igoing to be careful, because what are the younger sales associates? That wasin the class that I was teaching. So well, you mean one ofthose millennials Ole? Yeah, with basically like well, why would? Whywould I pick up the phone and call? I could text them or I'm like, look, I have been in this game for twenty years and Istill have my call blocks set aside four days a week. In fact,I made calls before I came in to class because my primary markets North America. So it's not about it not working, it's about the consistency and the combinationof the tools you have, not...

...just finding one that's going to bethe silver bullet. And the phone, like you said, more people pickup today than I that I would see him pick up four or five yearsago. When I call it it's just and the conversation and the reason peoplesay all the telephone doesn't work is because, a, they're afraid to pick upthe phone themselves and or they don't know how to use the phone.This is like I'm going to go down a rabbit hole real quick. Agreat voicemail message is only twelve to sixteen seconds. Twelve to sixteen seconds high. I'm mark under the Sales Center. Got Some information like to share withyou regarding trends in two thousand and eighteen. Couldn't give me a buzz. Fourhundred two, four four five two one zero. Four hundred and two, four four five two one zero. That's it. That's it. That'sit, that's it. That's it, very short, simple. Don't sitthere and a well, no wonder, no wonder. People can't stand becauseyou're in a village. You're coming across as a village idiot on the phone. And No, by the way, this is this. Yeah, I'msorry, I'm going to go down a rabbit hole real quick. People say, well, Gee, nobody. Nobody answers voicemail, nobody listens to voicemail. It's a using number of voicemail systems that now roll over to text messaging. Right, you know, on my phone, you leave me a voicemailand it comes through as a as a text message. HMM, that's interesting. So we're saying nobody looks at text messaging. There's a reason why theycall it text message and telephone conversations. Okay, I'll leave it at that. And so when you okay, so we look across social you look people, of course, use their network. There's the phone. Have you found, you know, kind of your secret sauce, the most effective technique inprospecting? If somebody would ask, well, I'm asking that, what would yousay? For you is the most effective technique in prospecting? Well,the most effective technique is using a combination of telephone and email. But thenyou got to use or repeat, repeat, repeat. So I'm going to telephone, a few days later on my email, few days later I'm ontelephone, I'm going to and I'm just going to continue to repeat. I'ma every day when I take a shower there's that words staring up, staringat me from the bottle. It says repeat, and that's really, youknow, the key to prospecting. It's not hard. You just got tobe willing to repeat, repeat, and and Oh, by the way,one other quick, quick piece. Every time you leave a message, itmust be a different message. Don't sit there and say did you get?Did you get my first get my voice, but I know you're all man,please you're killing me. Yeah, your email is so pathetic, idnorat the first time. So don't say I know Your Business. So didyou get it? You know I you get those right. Oh yeah,you get those emails. Stop it, people, stop it. You're giving, you're giving, you're giving my profession, our profession, a bad name.You know, I know you're busy. Or did you get my email?Did you? or or the voicemail that says, I know you're busy, so I'll send you an email. Then why the heck you leave mea voicemail then to tell me that you're going to send me an email?Just sleeping knee? Okay, I'm sorry. I'm sorry, I'm on a rand. Oh No, it's great, it's great. So all right,so let's talk about once you've connected with...

...someone, right, whether that beyou get their attention on social and take them offline or email or get themon the phone. Let's talk about that art of the follow up, right. What does it take to keep a prospect engaged? Yeah, it reallyit's about asking them questions. You ask them questions. What what I wantto do? The easiest way to for the art of the followup is thatinitial call. I want to uncover one piece of information and then I'm goingto do is I'm going to lead off my next conversation with you by comingback and asking you a more in depth question about what you shared with meon the first time. So this, this automatically defies the the sale stupiditylaw, be that the Sales Stupidity Law, and that says you ignore the customer, because now what you're doing as a customer saying, wow, thischat guy talk to me and I told him this, and here he iscalling me again. He's asked, wow, he actually remembered. He actually remembered. It's a that's like that. So you simply take each conversation andtie it back to the preceding one. You Tie it back by asking thema question to get them to explain further about it. It really, itreally is easy. It's not that hard, it's not it's really nice. It'sreally there's no black magic to there's no secret to it. It's whatI find it is a lot of reps don't have the focus and consistency.Take Squirrel, Squirrel, Oh yes, exactly, oh yeah, exactly,and that and that, I guess, lease into my next question. Let'stalk about technology for a second. So we've we've all, I mean,and I know you've seen it too. Ever, so cold calling's dead,or it's not that, or maybe it's social sale. You see all thedebates go on. And now we got some new tech coming around the corner. And so, since let's set people up for success in two thousand andeighteen, do you think of technologies like artificial intelligence and other things that arecoming out are going to drastically impact the way prospecting gets done in two thousandand eighteen or two thousand and nineteen? Well, AI stands for two things, artificial intelligence and artificial idiocy. And and then, and the problem Isee is that yet people are are claiming ai is going to know a AIis is going to help you because it is going to allow you to bemore intelligent so forth. But AI is never going to replace the salesperson,unless the salespersonal was it. If you bring value, and in the wayyou bring values to the questions you ask, to the questions you ask and thewillingness to engage, I find it. I think AI is actually going toincrease the value of salespeople because it's going to eliminate the stupid sales people, so the only ones that survive are the really good ones. I mean, and I'm not saying the sales profession is is at was going away.I don't think so at all. I and so on. I'm going toexpand even more because there's so much information out. To remember, AI workson behalf of the customer too, because they're going to get so much information. You're going to be confused, so we're going to have to be comingin and really helping to UN confuse them. Excellent, excellent. So I haveto ask. I keep an eye on your blog and you just hada great post up about why you're thankful for your career in sales. Ifanybody listening has not read it, I've urged you to go to the saleshuntercom read the blog post. It's great. But for those that aren't going toread it, because we both know some people just aren't going to doit, tell us why you are thankful...

...for your career in sales. Well, you can get the coloring book version and just I just did the twoguy. Yeah, now you know what I am so thankful because it allow, it has allowed me to really gain insights in to be able to influenceand impact people that I never thought I'd be able to otherwise. Sales tome, and I really define sales, is the ability to influence an impactpeople in a positive manner, to allow them to see and achieve what theydidn't think was possible. To me, that's absolutely fantastic. I mean it, if you really stopped, think about the good sales pers thing about thegood salesperson, think about all those personal conversations that you've had with customers overthe years. Isn't that meaningful to me? People have sold too exactly I mean, and and I mean I had a conversation this morning with a guywho called me and shared with me some conversation it shared with me some commentsabout his laws that. Think about that. That's a random conversation now that he'sa customer of mine, but that means he's developed a level of conferenceand trust in me. To me, that is what sales is all about. It's much more than just the money. You know, the money's great,all that sort of stuff, but it said ability to influence and impactpeople. To me, that that I get really really that's huge. That'shuge. Well said. Well said I completely, completely agree. So let'schange direction a little bit. At the end of the each interview, askkind of two standard questions and for you, what I would love our audience understandis when somebody that doesn't know you reaches out, what captures your attentionand builds their credibility? Had is a tough question, you know. Imean no seriously, it is because with with each person, you know,my whole goal, my whole goal in life, is that I want,with each person I come in contact with and I want them, at theend of their day, to sit there and say the conversation they had withme, mark today was one of the better parts their day. If Ican do that, then I've made an impact on people, because then I'veearned the right, the privilege, honor and respect to be able to talkwith you again. That's what trips might trigger. So really I like tothink what develops the credibility is just listening, just listening and not being the machine, being the individual human being, because at the end of the day, that's that's what we are. We're humans. Be It's not be tobe selling, it's not be TOC selling, it's h h human to human.Okay, I'm from people. I'm going off on a side, I'mgoing off on a side tangent, but what the heck? Right, hey, that's the beauty of this format.

Yeah, last question. We callit our acceleration in sight, in all of your experience and everything that youhave learned over the years, if you could give one piece of advice toa sales professional that you felt if they if they listened to, if theyembraced, would actually make them more effective tomorrow, what would it be?M Why? I'm not going to give you one, I'm going to giveyou two. Okay, one, you start off the end of that.You start off the week by saying, what's the big outcome I want toachieve for the week? What's the outcome? Not The activities. What's the outcome? To manage your day by your by your calendar. Just like you. You made the comment that you have your prospecting blocks. What's those blocksof time? So you set aside two hours for this, one hour forthis. It might be thirty minutes to take care of this. But allsuccessful people, high high achieving people, don't have to do list. Theymanage their activities by way of their calendar. And what does that do? Itkeeps some on task and it keeps some moving forward. Perfect. Markof the listeners interested in talking more about topics we've covered today. What's thebest way to get in contact with you? Well, the best way is thewebsite, and the website is the sales huntercom. Yes, Hunter ismy real last aim. I thank I thank my dad for that. Thankgoodness. I didn't get the name farmer, because account management's fine, but that'sfarming. I'm into hunting. I want to prospect. No, it'sthe sales huntercom. Is the website. That's the best way. And ofcourse, the books. You know, the main book high profit prospect.I can't really emphasize enough why people need to read struct you right now,the start of eighteen. What a great way grab the book kick it off. It's laid out in a very easy manner that you can use very well. I can't thank you enough for your time to day. It's been greathaving it on the show. Thank you. All right, everyone that does itfor this episode. Please check us out at be tob REV exaccom.Share the episode with friends, Family Co workers. If you like what youhere, do me a favorite, leave US review on itunes. We docheck it out to make sure we're bringing on people that are going to provideyou value. Until next time, we have value prime solutions with you all, nothing but the greatest success. You've been listening to the BB revenue executiveexperience. To ensure that you never miss an episode, subscribe to the showand Itunes or your favorite podcast player. Thank you so much for listening.Until next time,.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (238)