The B2B Revenue Executive Experience
The B2B Revenue Executive Experience

Episode · 4 years ago

Mark Holmes on Customer Experience "Chick-Fil-A" Style

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Any B2C company knows that customer experiences are a number one priority. What can B2B sales organizations learn from B2C customer experiences? More than you would think.

We sat down with Mark Holmes, CEO of Sales Revenue Coach and author of five books, to learn why B2B companies should be paying more attention to the buyer’s journey and what they can learn from the B2C customer experience.

You were listening to the BB revenue executive experience, a podcast dedicated to helping the executives train their sales and marketing teams to optimize growth. Whether you're looking for techniques and strategies or tools and resources, you've come to the right place. Let's accelerate your growth in three, two, one. Welcome everyone to the B Tob Revenue Executive Experience. I'm your host, Chad Sanderson. Today we're talking about Customer Experience Chick Fil a style, or, to be more precise, how btc guest experiences are impacting expectations around the be tob customer experience with a b Tob sales experience. To help us with the topic, we have with US mark home, CEO of the Sales Revenue Coach, author of five books, including the people keeper, the sales diamond and the latest one, the five rules of megavalue selling. Mark, thanks for taking the time today and welcome to the show. Great thanks for having me Chat. Appreciate it. So, before we jump into the topic of the day, we like to start with a random question just to give give our audience a little bit more insight into you. As you look back over your career and think about some defining moment that happened that kind of change trajectory or your perspective on things. You know, what was that event and what did you learn from it? Yeah, that's a great question. That launched me all the way back to fortify business thirty two years ago. I mean, oddly enough, you know, some people really search for their nitch or kind of the direction to take. My kind of just plopped or landed right in the middle mind fortunately, the first two clients I had while from very different industries. One was like a Caterpillar type dealer, you know, the heavy machinery. The other was an automobile dealer. They both, oddly enough, one of the very same thing they wanted me to send in and I didn't even know what these were secret shoppers, mystery shoppers, you know. I had to do a little research to find out what that really meant at the time, and they wanted me to send the man for the purpose of being able to find out how can we improve our sales but do it in a way that the customer appreciates, and I thought, well, that's an interesting approach, and that literally Chad was that opened my eyes to this whole perspective and I had come from sales, come from marketing, and you always kind of looked at push or pull marketing and all these different techniques and strategies and I just I get, you know, I thought this is profound. This is exactly how sales ought to be. We ought to be approaching it from the customers perspective, not ours, and so that really navigated my course. I've it's affected everything I still do to this day. Well, it's a concept that, you know, you see a lot of sales organizations struggle with because they're so focused on how they sell rather than, you know, how their customers buy. And it's a subtle, you know shift, maybe the opposite side of the coin, but it's becoming even more and more critical today. And when we were talking prepping for this interview, how you refer to it is as customer experience, Chick Fil a style, which I love. But for our...

...audience, can you provide some context around them? Yeah, I probab about to start with. You know, why Chick Fil a style? That's that's probably the most obvious place to start. Why not McDonald's or Duncan or, I know, Chick Fil A. I've oddly enough, I've had a parallel kind of course career. A lot of my work is with Betobes, a course in how to increase sales and to do that they've got to understand this need to really address it from the customers perspective. But with be TOC's, and I've had a number of them, like the chick fil a's and the Duncans and many others in the large retail stores, they're out after to do the same thing. They want to increase revenue that they know to do that. In reality, what they're really coming to me for is to help improve their gas or customer experience in order to produce that revenue. So it's the same end result, but one of them really gets it. The BETC's have gotten it for a long time. We've got to be able to concoct or create that experience for the customer, Chad that, you know, the the that they're going to appreciate, that they're going to want to repeat and come back and that's the message today for today's salesperson. It's the message today for today's sales executive or business owner. We've got to characterize that experience in a way that the customer says, you know what, I want to do business there, and that starts at the very, very begetting much like a BTC experience. If you drive on the lot of check fil a or Duncan donuts or it all starts right there. You look at the enterprise, you you, I mean you look at the building, you look at the grounds, you walk in, you see how people interact with you. It's from the moment you get inside that door all the way through to the conclusion and you're walking out the door front of the House, back of the House, and that's very similar to a be to be experience. It starts at the very beginning, when they click on the website, when they look for that article, when they're trying to watch that video, when they try to find what it is that you do differently, and then when they engage with a salesperson and they call and they talk to a secretary or receptionist. First all of those touch points add up because at the core of it, at the core of it, whether we're a B Toc or bb customer, we all have this running mental grade card. Ill give us an a or they're giving us a see here and then when they deal with them, they're giving them a d and when they walk away the guy, you know, that was just that was okay. It wasn't great, but it was okay. Well, we got to be up there in that great territory because more and more today, the company that gets the salesperson, who gets the sale, may very will come down to exactly how they were treated and the experience that they had overall. I'm here odd things today. I mean this is really crazy to me. I still kind of scratch my head. I I think, you know, seriously, million dollar deals are coming down to things like this. When we do exit interview, or not exit interviews, but when lost reviews, customers will say, well, you know it, they just got us, so it's got well, they just seem to understand US better. Or...

...this one they'll say, you know, we were just more comfortable with him or her. We just really like the way that they approached us, how they handled us, how they looked at our business. And I'm thinking, Wow, you know, you got to get that message today up in the sea suite, because that's what's happening down there on the ground. That's what we're hearing and it's out in the field. And now it's time for everybody and the organization wake up the fact that the customers experience is a whole lot more, maybe important, than what we've given it credit for. Right. Well, we when we've talked about this. Right. So, if you think about it, I mean I've been selling, more was selling before I moved into the sales enablement space, for for over a decade. That that CX dream, right like. We've seen companies invest in it. We've seen the reports that sex especially to be TOC space. It generates returns. I mean that. I forget the name of the company, but there's a report that showed the stock prices of those companies that invested in CX versus those that didn't. Write. This is one that we we used quite a bit when I was I was selling the global one thousand. The challenge always was, though, at first you had to get them to understand the importance of understanding what your customer was going through, and that was in organizations outside of the sales silo. And I'm wondering, you know, as you work with your customers today, how our sales executives handling the fact that, even in a be tob environment, they have to pay attention to every aspect back of the sales experience. It was hard for me selling it to CMOS and the CTOS, you know, five, ten years ago now, the salespeople who are so traditionally focused on what's my activity level or how am I guys selling? It's a little bit of a paradigm shift that. I'm curious how some of your clients or how you've seen people kind of respond to this need for an expanded awareness. Yeah, well, it's round the gambit, those who really get it, the enlightened ones, to those and there and, and I mean an intense interest on the one end of the spectrum to the other end of the spectrum just clueless, still not really understanding what kinds of mammoth changes have occurred and how quickly they need to adjust. But fortunately, and here's you know, I was penciling out before we talked today, Chad, something that people listening the audience may have some kind of fine of interest, and that is there. There's such a diversity today of businesses that have been affected by this shift in what the customer expects. I give you just a sense. I'm working with a transportation industry client. I'm working with a manufacturing processing equipment client of food manufacture and it construction management and can convenience store chain, to just name handful of them. And in every single case they are looking for something to improve their customers experience or guests experience. Some are looking to increase or improve their value proposition so that it's more centered on what the customer...

...values, not what the company or what the salesperson thinks we value, but actually doing our job, asking the kinds of questions to be able to identify the needs and concerns and skepticisms and assumptions and opportunities that the customer actually has so that we're selling and we're we're piecing or were creating our value proposition back to their message, not ours, and it whether it's a strategy to reposition in the marketplace or maybe they're responding to a problem. I got two clients right now that they came to me because they've gotten horrible reports from customers about the customer experience, so they're trying to reposition. I've got a large manufacture who says twenty five percent of our customers have no idea who their sales rep is and we it just blows your mind. And then, and then we start looking at our they were saying. We look at ourselves or customers journey, and we think, man, it's just completely out of sink with what we thought. And so now they're reconverting and they're changing their entire website and now, instead of going to their website and trying to hunt and find, they literally have their website being laid out like customers look for websites to be laid out, much like you'd go to Amazon and order, like I did this week, a brand new pair of shoes. You know is easy to find. I could go right to it. Well, the businesses that get it today, the sales executives who get it, the sales people who get it, know that what we've got to do is to be able to present to the customer what they're looking for. So maybe it's under a product or maybe it's an industry where they're trying to find the solution, or it's solutions or it's services, whatever it is, construct the way we sell that's comfortable for and aligned with that customers journey, and that that's really the test today. It's the ability to align the seals person and the sales process with the the customers journey and do it in a way that's congruent and consistent and they get that experience much like they would get if they were on Amazon or they went and went to a Duncan or they went to whatever they shop they get that immediacy that they want, they get the convenience that they want, they get the excellence that they want and they get the consistency that they want. It's the same thing. They want from be to be experiences. They want a mediacy, there's a sense of convenience. They want it when they want it, how they want it. They want that excellence that regardless of who they deal with, they want to be treated in a way that's excellent. They want excellent products and services delivered and they want it consistently. If they deal with the salesperson that's really, you know, focused on them and selling to their needs and understanding them and taking the time to create a relationship and create trust and to take it from the customers perspective. If they've got a salespersonal like that, when they deal with the account you know they counting office or the Finance Department or the field operations or technician or technical services department.

They expect all of those to be at the same level of consistency and excellence and when it's not, there's a disconnect. So this message is is certainly for sales people. We've got to get our act together. We've got to sell the way the customer wants to be sold to, but at the same time it's for the sales executive and the sea level suite to say we need to make an investment and make sure that we're from the front of the House to the back of the house. We're getting at AAA score from the customer when they call in, when they deal with us. And there's an article recently in Harvard Business Review where they analyze the bunch of bb buyers and they came up with the fact that, I think it was eighty six percent of buyers and organizations will actually pay more for a good experience. Right, and that's an experience that that's largely generated by the sales wrap in a BB world, and that eighty nine, it was eighty nine percent of people have actually stopped a buying process or gone with a competitor because they didn't like the way that they were being interfaced with and and that that point you make about understanding the customers journey. We've got. Man, I've done a lot of journey mapping with the organizations over the years and and there's a difference between at times, of customer journey and a buyers journey, and it's a subtle much like all of this. It's a subtle difference. But if you can get your sales reps to start looking at it from the buyers perspective, understand their definition of value, is what you're trying to uncover and connect to, it gets a lot more powerful. It's just so hard sometimes they get sales reps to, you know, just stop making statements and start asking questions. Yeah, and just you make such a great point. Those buyers motivations becomes so important because you may get a midlevel decision maker influencer calling in or they may be clicking on your website and touring around and then it could be someone else from their organization it. I mean it's a tough there's no question it's tough. It's challenging because you may have four or five or six or seven, what's the average to day? Seven point to you know, decision influencers to make a large purchase decision be to be so you're going to have to meet a different levels of needs and salespeople need to be very aware of that, that there's other people in their organization that are likely going to need to come in on the decision and they're going to need to curate their influence so that you know they're attending to their value drivers as much as they are the be you know, or the d level or whatever decision influencer and an organization. I will go back to something you said because I think it was a great point about customers buy more. They do buy more, they pay more and they refer more. You know, they're not as sensitive, most of the research shows are not as sensitive to a little bit of a price difference. They still want that value, but they're willing to pay for trust. They're willing to pay for relationship. And you know when customer, when when sales executives and when presidents of organizations and CEO's get this. Like I've got a small...

...manufacturer, Jazz, think you'll your audience. I love the story small manufacturer. Mean they get it and I was just talking to the CEO not long ago and they've got their system down now they've got two different locations or about a half a mile from each other. It's just how it it's kind of structured and they've got a manufacturing side and then they've got this distribution and part side and that's in a different building. And oftentimes people will come into the manufacturing side, where the president and the CEO and sales people and many other people are located, to walk in the door and then be like lost and where am I supposed to go? And so they've got a system. Now, let mean get this where they literally's most like a Duncan experience or chickfill experience. Well, they walk in the door, somebody greets them with a smile. They asked them if they'd like to have a drink, you know, maybe a bottle of water, Cup of coffee. They show them the restrooms. They tell them they don't worry, you're in the right company, it's just we have a different location, and they explain that and then they get to know them, they start asking them questions. It may be the CEO who walks out and just strikes up a conversation. You know what brought you in and how did you get here? How did you find out about it and how could use there anybody else in your car use we always talking me the other day about a guy but came in to buy a five dollar part from them and he says his wife was in the car, so they brought her and got her a bottle of water and by the time they got down the street. You they'll call ahead and say you've got Mr Mrs Jones coming. You know they're getting there. Are Interested in such and such and so somebody's ready at that facility. And he said that customer today, I mean get this, that was a five dollar, five dollar order. He said they've become a chemical purchase for us now. They spend thousands of dollars a year and they've already referred as to another actually a car wash owner that wants the same kinds of chemicals and he's spending thousands of dollars a year. So they've got it down. They've got this this understanding that we sell to the customer in a way that creates a memory that's worth repeating. It gives them a positive experience. We all know this. People don't buy unless they're comfortable for in the way in which we sell. They're not going to buy what we sell to. They're comfortable with how we sell and when it starts with respect and trust and listening and caring, it just resonates with customers today. They do want convenience, they want excellence, they want consistency, they want to know that you care well, and I mean you're right, your spot on right. And if you look at it, if you look at the way be to be people sell, it's so difficult sometimes to get them to take a breath and ask questions and then listen right, because most sales reps, especially be to be, they want to get in, they want to tell you how cool they are. Hey, you need to buy this, and nobody wants be Sel to, nobody wants to be so tame. Way It doesn't work right. You need to really start to find ways to be authentically connecting and that experience that some one has isn't made up of you know how you performed on this phone call versus that phone call. It's how you string together all those micro moments like, were you asking that well you...

...know, well informed questions? Did you do what you said you were going to do? Did you follow up? Did your email have spelling errors in it? Did the collateral, you send over, the case studies. Was it applicable to them? Right? It's all of this string together, these micro moments, and I think a lot of sales rep struggle and organizations fail to hit their numbers because they have a tendency not to embed ways for sales exacts and sales people to consistently and repeatedly create those relationships that lead to trust incredibility. Yeah, I like to do an exercise, Chad, when I open up that when I'm speaking some more in a training workshop, the same and I'll do a two minute drill and ask them to put together. You've got two minutes. You're going to be marched in front of your customer. It's somebody who you really want to land. As you understand it, several other competitors are going to be there. They've got two minutes too, I'm going to get that's all they've got. That's all you have. What would you communicate if all you had was two minutes to communicate to this customer you really really want to land? And so I give a minute and a half, two minutes, to come up with an invariably ninety eight percent. I've been doing this for years plus, will automatically go to that pitch what we think you ought to know right and then I'm after they've all done that, and then we play it back on video recording. If we recorded, I said, how could you possibly know? How could you know what they want unless you've asked? We all fall for this trap to launch into our pitch when one of two or both conditions exists. WERE UNB we're unprepared or were under pressure. Under pressure, you make me unprepared, I'm going to I'm going to blow it and I know it and I've done it. And when we're not prepared, we're going to do that every time. We'll go back to what we think we ought to tell to sell rather than what we ought to ask, in order to uncover their value drivers, to sell to them what they're really want to know about. That's why I hate powerpoint so much. You Better Kill Your power point you're going to kill the sale. And I also often get a lot of, you know, cross eyed looks at that one. But I mean, stop and think about it. What's more insane than standing up for thirty minutes or twenty minutes or an hour and flipping through all these slides sixty five slides or so on how here's what we think you ought to know about us so you'll buy us. And half of the audience is, you know, if not more, are already att tune and uninterested within the Lord first five or six minutes. Stop it and just have dialog. Ask questions throughout, or do something even insane and just say, you know what, I'm not I'm not going to have a power point. I want to have a dialog. I've got questions for you and I want to find out from you what it is you'd like to know for me. Or build your power point, for goodness sakes. From that perspective, stopping ask them. I was asked the other day by a salesperson. So what should you do with a powerpoint? I said, asked your customer, for Goodness Sakes. What do they want to hear? Information that they like to see. You cover and build your powerpoint, if they want one, according to what they want, not what you think they ought to know. Yeah, structure it for them first, you second, and that's a we see...

...that a lot in proposals. Even right the first fifteen pages are all of this why we're so cool, when really, you know they're just going to flip back and start with the pricing. So let's, you know, let's let's make sure we're structuring every element of the experience around how they're going to buy, what information they're going to want, when right, and providing them access to it in a way that's based off of their value drivers, what they're going to find valuable, not only business perspective, but also personally. So, you know, business is a personal thing. People buy from people that they trust that will drive them towards solutions. All right, not not just conflict exactly. I've seen that go. Yeah, Oh so, I was gonna say. So, when you think about I mean there's a bunch of challenges right for be to be companies that are trying to transform their sales teams. Of course, you've always you know, you got to train your sales guys. Most from haven't been trained. Even less have been trained in how to effectively prospect. Today. There's a lot of challenges and things that these that these organizations have to address. But if you could narrow it down and just pick like the top three challenges that you see be tob companies facing in terms of transforming their sales teams to provide a better sales experience and drive growth. kind of what would those three top challenges be from your perspective? Like? Number One, they've got to help theirselves, people, sales force, understand what it is the customers wanting when they arrive at the website or on a phone call and how they have changed. Quite frankly, many companies have underinvested for so long and sales training, Chad and sales enlightenment or sales education, that their sales force really doesn't have much of a great understanding about how it has changed and how millennials in many cases, are influencing eight out of every ten purchase decisions be to be and how the younger mindset or the younger buyers probably looking for more and more information without human contact. And that that I start with. that. You mentioned mapping the customers journey and in the customers mtor the buyers journey or the buyers motivations, and you've got you've got. That's a great place to start. Start that education and what it is they need to know. The second thing, I think, is another big challenge today and that's aligning the sales force, or even the sales process with that customers or buyers journey. Aligning the sales force efforts and the sales process with that journey is such an important part of being able to do it effectively. That is a real challenge, quite frankly. A lot of organizations just don't know how to do that. They don't know where to start, and that's that. That's going to be a challenge, but it's one that they need to certainly tackle. The the third I'd say, you know, I probably put my finger on not to be repetited, but training. It really today does come down to equipping the sales force and that sells person with...

...that ability to sell and communicate their value in a compelling way that differentiates from competitors and quantifies the value and the difference that they will make for customer. That's linked directly back to that customers value drivers and that may have taken ten seconds to say, but it takes a little longer to understand. I find a lot of this is easy to learn but it's difficult to apply, and so I think that's the other challenge. We've got to get the sales force willing to make a change and how they do sell, to wake up to the fact that this is very different world that we're in today and it's challenging and we need to find a way to sell better and we need to be more customer centric if we're going to do that. Yeah, we have without a doubt, that context switching, I think is difficult sometimes for sales executives because a lot of them, I found him, I don't know, maybe I'm alone in this, but I find that they have a tendency to want to, whether they are aware of it or not, make the perception of sales inside of their organization more complex than it needs to be, just as a way to build credibility for the sales function inside of the organization, when in practice it is the simplicity. It is the simple and simple's not easy. Right to your point, it's easy to learn it, but the application of it takes a commitment and a consistency that sales exacts have a tendency to not reinforce because they're so driven by, well, what's my pipeline look like for the quarter? What's my numbers look like for the quarter? And it needs to be a more institutional, more consistent approach to that enablement, in that training of individuals, especially as we see more BB buyers, becomes super sensitive about the experiences that they're engaging in with their providers. Yeah, in a word, I'd have to call a culture. I mean that's too if you had to put me in a corner and say, so, what do you work on really, if you can only say one thing that you're working on with clients, in reality it's culture. It's changing that sales culture so that sells people direct their own behavior, they leverage their own efforts and they're doing it for the right reasons and they understand their informed and they're open to that kind of change. So many sales cultures have been not deliberately or intentionally created, but they've just kind of happened and one day the sales manager wakes up or the cells executive looks at things a little more close than goes my gosh, this is not the culture we want, this is not how we want people behaving out there. Well, they're going to have to change some of the things they do up in the at the executive level, like stopping being obsessed about measuring sales and start measuring selling Beh are. Measuring sales is easy. Measuring selling behaviors a little different and you have to unpack that Nask yourself how can we change that behavior? And that's got to be changed through the culture and in fact I'm working with an organization right now on that and...

...they're literally working on this exercise of what are what are our values? What about we aspire to? What are our what our sales standards? How do we want people to sell? How do we want them to perform their job? What kind of attitude do we want them to have, and values do we want them to upholpe? When you start doing work like that, sales people are more than willing to make those changes, but you can't just hand them another torch and ask them to go like the field again. Understand you know why. Why am I doing this? That's that's the important question. We always want to focus on the how and here's what you need to change and make it happen now, but we skip that important question why. Yeah, it's interesting that the awareness we talked about when we work with clients, conscious competence versus unconscious competence, like being aware of the need for preparation, right, preparing what you believe the person you're going to be speaking with will find valuable, not what you need to get in front of them. You know, being prepared to ask questions that help you differentiate. Really focus on that experience. I was doing a keynote for a client, big sales kickoff, and I bought three Ikea chairs and I took the instructions out of one set, I cut these instructions and half in the other and then I picked one of the people that I was doing an analysis with, an assessment. I gave them a heads up in advance that hey, you're going to be putting together this chair for time at this event in front of everybody. So here's the instructions. Make sure you do your homework. And we call them up and you know, they teams of two and they start to put these chairs together and you hear the normal and if anybody's ever put together, and I don't mean to pick an Ikea but any self assembly furniture, at some point you want to throw the crap across the room and it's just that. It's that demonstration of what it takes to be prepared and make sure you know what the end goal is before you go in and doing your homework at practicing. It's going to change the experience, not only for the buyer, but it will change the experience for the sales reps to it will make them much more excited and authentic compassionate, because they're not pushing a stone uphill. Exactly. Well, everything we do contribute to the image we create for ourselves, and that image is never neutral. It will always be either positive or negative, and you can either, as a salesperson, decide that I want to intentionally create the image to that customer that I want and that relationship, or I can just let it happen and and be passive about it. I'd much rather know what kind of image I'm creating and so if I if I take that and I own that, then I start looking at how I do my emails differently, how I answer the phone, how I'm prepared, going through the disciplines and my mental preparedness, all the way down to my paper and pen sole work that I may do to get prepared for the questions I'm going to ask or the objections they mean, having my whole act together so that when I walk in I'm organized, I'm capable, I'm confident, I'm relaxed and I can focus on that customer and I'm not caught off guard and I...

...don't have all that tension that exists. You know, I just I'm free of that when I walk it. That's my message to sells people often. You know, look, you got all these touch points. Determine how you want to be perceived, because when you do it right, you're going to be in that trust corner. You don't want to be in the commodity coffin corner. You want to be in that, you know, value vault. And to get there you've got to create the trust and relationship and that takes asking questions, listening, speaking their language, identifying with their values. Yeah, excellent. So let's change the direction little bit. We ask kind of our guest two standard questions towards the end of each interview. First is simply, as a revenue executive yourself, that means your prospect for other individuals out there, or a target, depending on how you want to call it. But I'm curious. I always like to hear when somebody's trying, somebody you don't know is trying to get your attention and connect in a credible way to have a conversation. What captures your attention what gets you to respond to somebody? Oh, good question. You know, for me it's pretty simple. They've got to be able to what really it's my attention, what gets through the clutter of a really busy day and a lot of distraction is if they answer for questions in lesson twenty five seconds. I want to know who they are, why are they calling? I want to know what do they want, what do they want me to do? And fourthly, I want to know what's the benefit to me if I do what you want me to do, and I want all of that under twenty five seconds or so. If you can answer that and email that I can peruse and look through in less than twenty five seconds, a hundred words. You can do that in a voicemail or you can do it on a phone call, you got my attention. And specifically, of course, I'm presuming that they're narrowing in on the on an area of need that I have, but just their approach. I mean, I we'ed people out really quickly and I think customer generally do this based on their approach. If they're in confident or they're rambling and they're, you know, uncleared disorganized, if they're coming across the speel highlights. Sensitive to that, and this, you know, we hit that to leave button worth really boom, you're out of there. Yeah, that's what gets through. For me, excellent, and so we call our last question acceleration in safe there's one thing you could tell sales, marketing professional services people, one piece of advice that, if they internalize them, listen, you believe, would help them be more successful hit their targets. What would it be, and why? No, Gosh, okay, I'm going to, I'm a cheat and give you two real quick last one long number one, I'd say the customers perspective. You've got it, you don't know the step out away from your desk, crawl or across the desk onto their desk, so to speak, and look at everything about selling and about what you sell and what you represent from the customers perspective and build out your approach according to that. That's number one. Number two, prepare, prepare, prepare, just like retails, location, location, location, sort of, or used to be it. Today, for the today's be tob salesperson, it's prepare, prepare,...

...be ready, be organized. If you're not spending ten to fifteen minutes preparing seriously for at least that long for a sales call and what you're going to ask and the objections and your sales call objective. If not considerably more than you're not doing your job. Excellent mark. For listeners interested in talking more about the topics we touched on today, what's the best way to get in touch with you? Yeah, you can go to my website, sales revenue coachcom. There's some articles there, on the blog, etc. And find some resources there or contact me, mark at sells revenue coachcom. thankscellent mark. I can't thank you enough for the time day. It's been great having me on the show. Great well, thanks for having me. It's been pleasure. Thank you, Jan. All right, everyone that does it for this episode, please check us out. Of Be to be REV exactcom share the episode of Friends, family, Co workers. Let us know what you're thinking and until next time, we have value prime solutions. With you all. Nothing but the greatest success. You've been listening to the BB revenue executive experience. To ensure that you never miss an episode, subscribe to the show and Itunes or your favorite podcast player. Thank you so much for listening. Until next time,.

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