The B2B Revenue Executive Experience
The B2B Revenue Executive Experience

Episode · 3 years ago

Mark Holmes on Customer Experience "Chick-Fil-A" Style

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Any B2C company knows that customer experiences are a number one priority. What can B2B sales organizations learn from B2C customer experiences? More than you would think.

We sat down with Mark Holmes, CEO of Sales Revenue Coach and author of five books, to learn why B2B companies should be paying more attention to the buyer’s journey and what they can learn from the B2C customer experience.

Were listening to the BTB revenueexecutive experience, a podcast, dedicated ELPA executives, train theirsales and marketing teams to optimize growth, whether you're looking fortechniques and strategies wore tools and resources, you've come to the rightplace. Let's accelerate your growth in three to one: welcome everyone to the Bto be revenue. Executive experience on your host Chad Sanderson today we'retalking about customer experience. Chick fillet style were to be moreprecise. How betosee guest experiences are impacting expectations around thebtob customer experience, with e B to be sales experience to help us with Hatopic. We have with US Mark Home Ceo, the sales revenue coach author of fivebooks, including the people, keeper, the sales diamond and the latest one.The five rules of mega value selling mark thanks for taking the time todayand welcome to the show great thanks for having me Chana' appreciate it. Sobefore we jump into the topic of the day, we like to start with a a randomquestion just to give our audience a little bit more insight into you. Asyou look back over your career and think about some defining moment. Thathappened, that kind of change trajectory or your perspective onthings, you know what was that event and what did you learn from it? Yeah, that's a great question thatlaunched me all the way back to sortof my business. Tornto years ago I mean,oddly enough, you K ow some people really search for their Nich or kind of the direction. Tho takem kind of just clopped or landed right in the middle of mind. Fortunately, thefirst two clients I had while from very different industries, one was likeCaterpillar type dealer. You know the heavy machinery n, the UNR was anautomobile dealer. They both oddly enough one od the very same thing theywanted me to send in, and I didn't even know what these were secret shoppersmystery shoppers. You know I had to do a little research to find out what thatreally meant at the time, and they wanted me to send them in for thepurpose of being able to find out. How can we improve our sales, but do it ina way that the customer appreciates- and I thought well that's aninteresting approach and that literally Chad was that opened my eyes to this wholeperspective and I had come from sales come from marketing and you always kindof looked at pusher poll marketing and all these different techniques andstrategies- and I just you know, I thought this is profound. This isexactly how sales ought to be. We ought to be approaching it from the customersperspective, not ours, and so that really navigated my course. I've bitsaffected everything. I still do to this day. Well, an it's a concept that youknow you see a lot of sales organization struggle with, becausethey're so focused on how they sell, rather than you know how theircustomers buy, and it's a subtle you know, shift, maybe the opposite side ofthe corn, but it's becoming even more and more critical today and when wewere talking preppin for this interview you refer to, it is, as customerexperience, chick filet style, which I...

...love, but up for our audience, can youprovide some context around that yeah? I probably got TA start with. You knowwhy Chick Fo Lio? That's that's, probably the most obvious place tostart. Why not McDonalds or Duncan, or I know, chick fillet I've. Oddly enough,I've had a parallel kind, of course, career Bo lot of my work is with BtaBeesa course, and how to increase sales and to do that. They've got tounderstand this need to really address it from the customers perspective, butwith btcs and I've had a number of them like the chick fillets and the Duncansand many others in the large retail stores they're out after to do the samething. They want to increase revenue that they know to do that in reality.What they're really coming to me for us to help improve their guest or customerexperience in order to produce that revenue? So it's the same in result,but one of them really gets it. The bdcs have gotten it for a long time.We've got to be able to concoct or create that experience for the customer,Chad that you know the that they were going to appreciate that they're goingto want to repeat and come back and that's the message today for today'ssalesperson. It's the message O da for today's sales, executive or businessowner we've got to characterize that experience in a way that the customersays you know what I want to do business there, and that starts at thevery very begin much like a btoc experience. If you drive on the lot ofChicku filet or Dungan donuts or it all starts right there, you look at theenterprise, you you, I mean you look at the building. You look at the ground.You Walk in. You see how people interact with you. It's from the moment.You get inside that door all the way through to the conclusion and you'rewalking out the door front of the House back of the House and that's verysimilar to a be to be experience. It starts at the very beginning when theyclick on the website when they look for that article, when they're trying towatch that video when they try to find what it is that you do differently andthen when they engage with a salesperson and they call and theytalkd to a secretary or receptionist first, all of those touchpoints add upbecause at the core ofit at the Corp of it, whether we're a BDC or BTB customer.We all have this running mental grade card like to call give us a NA orthey're, giving us a sea here and then, when they deal with them, they'regiving them a d and when they walk away the guy. You know that was just thatwas okay, it wasn't great, but it was okay. Well, we got to be up there inthat great territory, because more and more today the company that gets the salespersonwho gets the sell mayvery will come down to exactly howthey were treated and the experience that they had. Overall, I'm hearing oddthings today I mean this is really crazy to me. I still kind of scratch.My head, I think you know seriously. Million dollar deals are coming down tothings like this. When we do exidn rerview, not exitinvuws, but when losswerd use, customers will say well, you know it.They just got us so what I gos we they...

...just seem to understand us better orthis one that they'll say you know we were just more comfortable with him orher. We just really like the way that they approached us how they handled us,how they looked at our business and I'm thinking wow. You know you got to getthat message today: op in the sea, sweet because that's what's happeningdown there on the ground, that's what we're hearing and it's out in the fieldand now it'e time for everybody in the organization. Wake up the fact that thecustomers experience is a whole lot, more, maybe important than what we'vegiven it credit for right. Well, We'e! We we've talked about this right, so,if you think about it, I mean I've been selling more was selling. Before Imoved into the sales n eblement space for over a decade that that CX dreamright, like we've seen companies investen, it we've seen the reportsthat CX, especially in to BDC space it generates returns. I mean I forget thename of the company with there's a report that showd the stock prices ofthose companies that invested in CX versus those that didn't right. Thiswas one that we we used quite a bit when I was, I was selling the globalone thousand. The challenge always was, though, at first you had to get them tounderstand the importance of understanding what your customer wasgoing through, and that was in organizations outside of the Sales Silo,and I'm wondering you know, as you work with your customers today, how aursales executives handling the fact that even in a bea O be environment, theyhave to pay attention to every aspect of the sales experience. It was hardfor me selling it to CMOS and CTOS. You know five ten years ago now the salespeople who are so traditionally focused on well, what's my activity level orhow am Mi guys selling it's a little bit of a paradim shift and I'm curioushow some of your clients ar or you've seen people kind of respond to thisneed for an expanded awareness. Yeahwell it's around the gambit oe oreally get it the enlightened ones to those and theyre, and I mean an intenseinterest on the one end of the spectrum to theother end of the spectrum. Just clueless still not really understanding whatkinds of mammoth changes have occurred and how quickly they need to adjust.But fortunately, and here's you know, I was penciling out before we talkedtoday, chaired something that people listening. The audiests may havesome kind of find of interest, and that is ther. There's such a diversity todayof businesses that have been affected by this shift in what the customerexpects. I give you just a sense: I'm working with a transportation industry,client, I'm working with a manufacturing, processing, equipment,client of food manufacture and it a construction management and conconvenience storechain you just name handful of them and in every singlecase they are looking for something to improve their customers, experience orguests experience. Some are looking to increase or improve their valueproposition so that it's more centered...

...on what the customer values, not whatthe company or what the salesperson thinks we value, but actually doing ourjob asking the kinds of questions to be able to identify the needs and concernsand skepticisms and assumptions and opportunities that the customeractually has so that we're selling and we're we're pieacing or we're creatingour value proposition back to their message, not ours, and whether it's a strategy to hereposition in the market place or maybe they'r responding to a problem. I gottwo clients right now that they came to me because they've gotten horriblereports from customers about the customer experience so they're tryingto reposition I've got a large manufacturer who says twenty fivepercent of our customers have no idea who their Celes Rep is, and we SHU FI.It just blows your mind and then and then we start looking at our our. Theywere saying we look at ourselves or our customers journey and we think man,it's just completely out of scent with what we thought and so now, they'rereconverting and they're. Changing their entire website and now, insteadof going to their website and trying to hunt and find they literally have theirwebsite being laid out like customers look for websites to be laid out. Muchlike you go to Amazon and order, like I did this week, a brand new pair ofshoes. You know it was easy to find. I could go right to it. Well, thebusinesses that get it today, the sales executives you get it the sales peoplewho get. It know that what we've got to do is to be able to present to thecustomer what they're looking for so maybe it's under a product or maybeit's an industry where they're trying to find a solution or it's solutions orit's services whatever it is construct the way we sell, that's comfortable forand aligned with that customers journey and that that's really the testoday.It's the ability to align the sales person and the salls process with thethe customers journey and doing a way that's congruent and consistent, andthey get that experience much like they would get if they were on Amazon orthey went and went to a Duncan or they went to whatever they shop. They getthat immediacy that they want. They get the convenience that they want. Theyget the excellence that they want and they get the consistency that they wantthe same thing they want from B to be experiences. They want a mediacy,there's TA sense of convenience. They want it when they want it, how theywant it. They want that excellence that, regardless of who they deal with, theywant to be treated in a way. That's excellent. They want excellent productsand services delivered and they want it consistently. If they deal with asalesperson. That's really, you know focused on them and selling to theirneeds and understanding them and taking the time to create a relationship andcreate trust and to take it from the customers perspective. If they've got asalesperson like that, when they deal with the account, you know the counting office or theFinance Department or the field...

...operations or technician or technicalservices department, they expect all of those to be at the same level ofconsistency and excellence and when it's not there's a disconnect. So this messageis certainly for sales. People we've got to get our act together. We've gotto sell the way the customer wants to be sold to, but at the same time it'sfor the sales executive and the sea level sweet to say we need to make aninvestment and make sure that we're from the front of the House to the backout of the House we're getting that AAA score from the customer when they callin when they deal with this there's an article recently in ourbusiness review,where they analyzed a a bunch of Beto, be buyers, and they came up with thefact that I think it was. Eighty six percent of buyers and organizationswill actually pay more for a good experience right and that's anexperience. That's largely generated by the sales rap in a beato. Be World andthat eighty nine think was eighty nine percent of people have actually stoppeda buying process or gone with a competitor because they didn't like theway that they were being interfaced with, and that that a point you makeabout your understanding, Tha customers journey we've got man. I've done a lotof journey mapping with with organizations over the years and andthere's a difference between at times a customer journey and a buyer's journey,and it's a subtle much like all of this. It's a subtle difference, but if youcan get your Sallles raps to start looking at it from the buyersperspective unnderstand, their definition of value is what you'retrying to uncover and connect to. It gets a lot more powerful, wit's just Hohard, sometimes o get sales rips to you know just stop making statements andstart asking questions. Yeah and just you make such a great point. Ts Buyers,motivations, become so important because you may get a MED leveldecision maker influencer calling in or they may be clicking on your websitetouring around, and then it could be someone else from their organization.It I mean it's a tough there's, no question, it's tough, it's challengingbecause you may have four or five or six or seven watce the average Oday.Seven point: two. You know decision influencers to make a a large purchasedecision, Bob, so you're going to have to meet a different levels of needs andsales. People need to be very aware of that that there's other people in theirorganization that are likely going to need to come in on the decision andthey're going to need to curiate their influence so that you know they'reattending to their value drivers as much as they are the b you know or thed level or whatever decision, influencirin an organization.I'm goin no go back to something you said because I think was a great pointabout customers buy more, they do buy more, they pay more and they refer more.You know they're not as sensitive most. The research shows are not as sensitiveto a little bit of a price difference. They still want that value, but they'rewilling to pay for trust, they're willing to pay for relationship- andyou know when customer, when, when sales executives and when presidents oforganizations and CEOS get this like...

I've got a small manufacture, jazz, Ithink you'll, your audience will love this story, small manufacture, I meanthey get it, and I was just talking to the co not long ago, and they've gottheir system down now: they've Hav, two different locations, ore about a half amile from each other. It's just how it's kind of structured and they've gota manufacturing side, and then they've got this distribution and partside andthat's in a different building and often times people will come into themanufacturing side, where the president and the CEO and sales people and manyother people are located to walk in the door and I be like lost Ond. Where am Isupposed to go, and so they've got a system now. Let me get this where theylitter is most like a Duncan experience or checkfile experience when they walkin the door, somebody greets them with a smile. They asked him if they'd liketo have a drink. You know maybe a bottle of Water Cup of coffee. Theyshow them the rest rooms, they tell them, they don't worry you're in theright company. It's just. We have a different location and they explainthat and then they get to know them. They start asking them questions. Itmay be the CEO who walks out and just strikes up a conversation. You knowwhat brought you in and how did you get here? How did you find out about us andhow can is there anybody else in your car, Yousedto Wel Awas telling me theother day about a guy but came in to buy a five dollar part from them, andhe said his wife was in the car, so they brought her ind got her a bottleof water and by the time they got down the street. You know they'll call aheadand say: You've got Mister misss Jones coming, you know, they're get they'reeinterested in such and such and so somebody's ready at that facility, andhe said that customer today I mean get this. That was a five dollar. Fivedollar order, he said, they've become a chemical purchase for us now they spendthousands of dollars a year and they've already referred us to another,actually, a carwash owner that wants the same kinds of chemicals and he'sspending thousands of dollars a year. So they've got it down. They've gotthis, this understanding that we sell to the customer in a way that creates amemory that's worth repeating. It gives them that positive experience that weall know this people don't buy unless they're comfortable for in the way inwhich we sell they're not going to buy what we sell to they're comfortablewith how we sell and when it starts with respect and trust and listeningand caring. It just resonates with customers. Today they do wantconvenience, they want excellence, they want consistency. They want to knowthat you care well, and I mean you're right your spot on right and if youlook at it, if you look at the way be to be people, so it's so difficult,sometimes to get them to take a breath and ask questions and then listen, Ri h,because most sales wraps especially betob. They want to get in, they wantto tell you ow cool, they are hey, you need to buy this and nobody wants to besold to. Nobody wants to be Soll tame more. It doesn't work right. You needto really start to find ways to be authentically connecting and thatexperience that someone has isn't made up of. You know how you performed onthis phone call versus that phone. Call it's how you string together. All thosemicromoments like weere, you asking Thi.

Well, you know well informed questions.Did you do what you said you were going to do? Did you follow up? Did youremail have spelling errors in it? Did the collateral you send over the casethat is, was it applicable to them right? It's all of this stringingtogether these micromoments and I think, a lot of sales. Rep Struggle andorganizations fail to hit their numbers because they have a tendency not toembed ways for sales exacts and sales people to consistently and repeatedlycreate those relationships that lead to trust incredibility yeah I like to doan exercise chat when I open up tha when I'm speaking some more I'm atraining workshop, the same and I'll do a two minute drill and ask them to puttogether. You've got two minutes: You're going to be marched in front ofyour customer it'. Somebody who you really want to land. As you understandit, several other competitors are going to be there. They've got two minutestoo I'm going to get. That's all they've got. That's all you have. Whatwould you communicate if all you had was two minutes to communicate to thiscustomer? You really really want to land, and so I give ha minute nd a halftwo minutes to come up with it. Invariably, Ninety eight percent I'vebeen doing this for years plus will automatically go to that pitch. What wethink you ought to know right and then I'm after they've all done that, andthen we play it back on video recording if we recorded, I said how could youpossibly know? How could you know what they want unless you' ask? We all fallfor this trap to launch into our pitch when one of two or both conditionsexist, were unwere unprepared or were under pressure under pressure. You make me unprepared,I'm going Ta, I'm Goinna blow it, and I know it and I've done it and in whenwe're not prepared we're going to do that. Every time we'll go back to whatwe think we ought to tell to sell, rather than what we ought to ask inorder to uncover their value drivers to sell to them. whath they're reallyWantin, to know about that's why I hate powerpoint so much you better, kill your power pointyou're going to kill the Sall, and I also often get a lot of you know. Crosseyed looks at that one, but I mean stop and think about it. What's more insanethan standing up for thirty minutes or twenty minutes or an hour and flippingthrough all these slide, sixty five slides or so on? How here's? What we think you ought to knowabout us, so you'll buy us and half of the audience is you know if not moreare already out of tune and uninterested within the Lor? First,five or six minutes, stop it and just have dialogue. Ask questions throughoutor do something even insane and just say you know what I'm Noti'm not goingto have a a powerpoint. I want to have a dialogue. I've got questions for youand I want to find out from you what it is you'd like to know for me or buildyour powerpoint for goodness sakes. From that perspective, stop and askedThim. I was asked the other day by a sales person. So what should you dowith a powerpoint? I said Ash, your customer for Goodness Sakes. What dothey want to hear information? Would they like to see you cover and buildyour power point if they want one according to what they want now, whatyou think they ought to know yeah structure it for them. First, yousecond and that's a we see that a lot...

...in proposals even right. The firstfifteen pages are all of this. Why were so cool when really you know they'rejust going to flip back and start with the pricing? So, let's O N- let's, let's make sure we'restructuring every element of the experience around how they're going tobuy what information they're going to want when and providing them access toit in a way, that's based off of their value drivers, what they're going tofind Valuabl, not only business perspective, Bute! Also personally, soyou know, business is a personal thing. People buy from people that they trustthat will drive them towards solutions right, not not just conflict exactly. I man that go ahead. Oh so Iwas Jos say so when you think about, I mean, there's a bunch of challengesright for B to be companies that are trying to transform their sales teams. Of course, you've, always you know yougot to train yoursales guys, most of them haven't been trained, even lesshave been trained in how to effectively prospect today, there's a lot ofchallenges and things that these that these organizations have to address,but if you could narrow it down and just pick like the top three challengesthat youce BTB companies facing in terms of transforming their sales teamsto provide a better sales experience and drive growth kind of what wouldthose three top challenges be from your perspective in number, one they've gotto help. theirselves people sells force understand what it is. The customer iswanting when they arrive at the website or on a phone call and how they havechanged. Quite frankly, many companies have under invested for so long andsales, training, chat and Sales Enlightenment or sells education thattheir sales force really doesn't have much of a a great understanding abouthow it has changed and how millennials, in many cases are influencing eight outof every ten purchase decisions be to be and how the younger mindset or theyounger buyes, probably looking for more and more information without humancontact, and that that I I' start with that. You mentioned mapping thecustomers journey and in the customers, motor the buyersjourney or the byers, motivations and you've got. You got that's a greatplace to start start that education and what it is they need to know. Thesecond thing, I think, is another big challenge today and that's a ligning,the sales force or even the sales process, with that customers or buyersjourney, aligning the sales force efforts and the sales process with thatjourney is such an important part of being able to do it effectively. That is a real challenge. Quite frankly,a lot of organizations just don't know how to do that. They don't know whereto start, and that's that that's going to be a challenge, but it's one thatthey need to certainly tackle the third I'd say you know, I probably put my finger onnot to be repetitive, but training really today does come down toequipping the sales force and that sells person with that ability to selland communicate their value in a...

...compelling way that differentiates fromcompetitors and quantifies the value and the difference that they will makefor customer. That's linked directly back to that customers, value driversand that may have taken ten seconds to say, butit takes a little longer to understand. I find a lot of this is easy to learn,but it's difficult to apply, and so I think that's the other challenge. We'vegot to get the sales force willing to make a change and how they do sell towake up to the fact that this is very different world that we're in today andit's challenging, and we need to find a way to sell better and we need to bemore customer centric if we're going to do that, a without a dobt that context,switching, I think, is difficult, sometimes for sales executives, becausea lot of them. I found him- and I don't know- maybe I'm alone in this, but Ifind that they have a tendency to want to whether they're aware of it or notmake the perception of sales inside of their organization more complex than itneeds to be just as a way to build a credibility for the sales functioninside of the organization when, in practice it is the simplicity, it isthe simple and simple's not easy right to your point. It's easy to learn it,but the application of it takes commitment and a consistency that salesexacts have a tendency to not reinforce because they're so driven by well.What's my pipe plan? Look like for the quarter. What's my numbers look likefor the quarter, and it needs to be a more institutional, more consistentapproach to that enablement in that training of individuals, especially aswe see more beatebe buyers, become super sensitive about the experiencesthat they're engaging in with their providers. Yeah an a word. I'd have tocall it culture, I mean that's. If you they had to put me in a corner and sayso. What do you work on? Really, if you can only say one thing that you'reworking on with clients in reality, it's culture, it's changing that salesculture, so that sells people direct their own behavior.They leverage their own efforts and they're doing it for the right reasons,and they understand they're, informed and they're open to that kind of change.So many sales cultures have been not deliberately or intentionally created,but they'v, just kind of happened, and one day the sales manager wakes up orthe sales executive looks at things a little more close thing goes, my gosh.This is not the culture we want. This is not how we want people behaving outthere. Well, they're going to have to change some of the things they do up inat the executive level, like stopping being obsessed about measuring salesand start measuring selling behavior measuring sales is easy: measuringselling behaviors a little different when you have to unpack that and askyourself: How can we change that behavior and that's got to be changedthrough the culture and, in fact, I'm working with an organization right nowon that and they're literally working...

...on this exercise of what? What are ourvalues? What aboutous do we aspire to whatabou? What are our sales standards?How do we want people to sell? How do we want them to perform their job? Whatkind of attitude do we want them to have and values? Do we want them to uphoewhen you start doing work like that sells people are more than willing tomake those changes, but you can't just hand them another torch and ask them togo like the field again, O understand. You know why. Why am Idoing this? That's that's the important question. We always want to focus onthe how and here's what you need to change and make it happen now, but weskip that important question. Why Yeah it's interesting that theawareness we talk about when we work with clients, conscious conpidenceversus unconscious confidence, like being aware of the need for preparationright preparing what you believe the person Au're going to be speaking withwill find valuable, not what you need to get in front of them. You know beingprepared to ask questions that help. You differentiate, really focus on thatexperience I was, I was doing a keynote for a client, big sales kickoff, and I bought three Ikia chairs and I tookthe instructions out of one set. I cut these instructions in half in the other,and then I picked one of the people a I was doing an analysis with a atAssessam with I gave them a heads up in advance that hey you're, going to beputting together this chair for time at this event in front of everybody, sohere's the instructions make sure you do your homework and we call them upand you know they did teams of to and they start to put these chairs togetherand you hear the normal and, if anybody's ever put together- and Idon't mean to pick an Ikia but any self assembly furniture at some point- youwant to throw the crap across the room, and it's just that it's that you knowdemonstration of what it takes to be prepared and make sure you know whatthe end goal is before you go in and doing your homework and praxiing it'sgoing to change the experience not only for the buyer, but it will change theexperience for the sales reps too. It will make them much more excited and authentic and passionate,because they're not pushing a stone up hill. Exactly we everything we docontributes to the image we create for Ourselfe and that image is neverneutral. That will always be either positive or negative, and you caneither, as a salesperson, decide that I want to intentionally create the imageto that customer that I want in that relationship or I can just let ithappen and and be passive about it. I'd much rather know what kind of image I'mcreating, and so, if I, if I take that and I own that, then I start looking athow I do my emails differently. How I answer the phone, how I'm preparedgoing through the disciplines and my mental preparedness all the way down tomy paper and Pencil work that I may do to get prepared for the questions I'mgoing to ask or the objections they mak having my whole act together, so thatwhen I walk in I'm organized I'm capable I'm confident I'm relaxed, andI can focus on that. CUSTOMAND, I'm not...

...caught off guard and I don't have allthat tension that exists. You know I'm free of that when I walk that's mymessage: The sales people, often that you know look you got all these touch-points determine how you want to be perceived, because when you do it right,you're going to be in that trust corner, you don't want to be in the commodity,coughing corner you want to be in that you know value vault and to get there.Youve got to create the trust and relationship, and that takes askingquestions listening speaking o their language, identifying with their valuesyeah excellent. So let's change direction a lottle bit. We ask kind ofour guess two standard questions towards the end of each interview.First, as simply as a revenue executive yourself, that means your prospect forother individuals out there or target, depending on how you want to call it. But I'm curious. I always like to hearwhen somebody's Talling, somebody, you don't know, is trying to get yourattention and connect an a credible way to have a conversation. What capturesyour attention? What gets you to respond to somebody? Oh good question,you know for me, it's pretty simple: they've got to be able to at reallyit's my attention. What gets through the clutter of a really busy day and alot of distraction is if they answer four questions in less than twenty fiveseconds. I want to know who they are. Why are they calling? I want to knowwhat do they want? What do they want me to do? And fourthly, I want Te. What'sthe benefit to me? If I do what you want me to do, and I want all of thatunder twenty five seconds or so, if you can answer that and email that I canperuse and look through in less than twenty five seconds a hundred words,you can do that in a voice mail, you can do it on a phone call. You got myattention and specifically, of course, I'm presuming that they're narring inon the on an area of need that I have but just their approach. I mean I weedpeople out really quickly and I think customer generally do this based ontheir approach. If they're in confident of the rambling and Theyre, you knowuncleared disorganized, if they're coming across the piel were just highlysensive to that and this you know we have tha, delete button, Orsaly you'reout of there yeah, that's what gets through for me excellent. So we callour last question acceleration insiht, there's one thing: You could tell salesmarketing professional services, people one piece of advice that if theyinternalize them listen, you believe, would help them be more successful, hittheir targets. What would it be and why Oh Gosh, okay, I'm gonna, I'm Ga cheatand give you two real, quick ste on Te. Ta Number One I'd say the customersperspective. You've got it. You don't know the step out away from your deskcrawl or cross the desk on to their desk, so to speak and look ateverything about selling and about what you sell, what you represent from thecustomers perspective and build out your approach. According to that,that's number one number two prepare prepare prepare just like retailslocation, location, location, sort of or used to be it today for the today'sbtob sales person. It's prepare,...

...prepare, be ready, be organized ifyou're not spending ten to fifteen minutes preparing seriously, for atleast that long for a sales call and what you're going to ask and theobjections and your selves call objective, if not considerably morethan you're, not doing your job excellent mark, velisters interested intalking more about the topics we touched on today. What's the best wayto get in touch with you, yeah, you can go to my website sales revenue,coachcom, there's some articles there on the blog etcete and find some resources there or contactMing mark at Salles revenue, coachcom excellent mark. I can't thank youenough for the timedayit's been great having you on the show great well, thanks for having me it'sbeen pleasure. Thank you, Ya, all right, everyone that does it for this episode.Please check us out of BTB. REVIC zachcom share the episode with friends,Family Coworkers. Let us know what you're thinking and until next time wehave value prime solutions with you all nothing, but the greatest success you've been listening to the BTBrevenue executive experience to ensure that you never miss an episodesubscribe to the show in Itunes for your favorite podcast player. Thank youso much for listening until next time.

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