The B2B Revenue Executive Experience
The B2B Revenue Executive Experience

Episode · 3 years ago

Leadership Boils down to “Don’t Be an A**hole” w/ Jeffrey Hayzlett

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In your business, be greater than a leader, be a hero.

It’s not profit over people that will make your business successful—it’s when you combine people and profits that you become a hero.

On a recent B2B Revenue Executive Experience podcast, I spoke with Jeffrey Hayzlett, coauthor of The Hero Factor: How Great Leaders Transform Organizations and Create Winning Cultures. He’s also the CEO of C-Suite Network, the world’s most powerful network of C-Suite leaders. He shared his ideas about how a leader can make or break a company.

It's tough to do the right things all the time, but it's the right thing, and so when you find that you start practicing these things right from the start, makes it easier over time because it becomes part of the culture. You're listening to the BDB revenue executive experience, a podcast dedicated to helping executives train their sales and marketing teams to optimize growth. Whether you're looking for techniques and strategies were tools and resources, you've come to the right place. Let's accelerate your growth in three, two, one. Welcome everyone to the B Tob Revenue Executive Experience. I'm your host, Chad Sanderson. So let's start with a question. What does it take to be a true leader today, not just for individuals, but also for companies? The landscapes changed, business has changed, people continue to change as always, and what we relied on in the past is proving to be nothing more than an anchor to current future success. This is an important question because the workforce of today, whether it's Jen X, millennials, Gen Z, they all want something slightly different. They have different expectations of their employers and of themselves. They interface with the concept of work differently than many, and today we're going to discuss what it takes to be a modern hero type leader. To tackle the topic, we have with this Jeffrey Hazlet, CEOC suite networks and host of the all business podcast, former CMO of Eastman Kodak and author of the Hero Factor, a book focused on creating modern heroes. Jeffery, thank you very much for taking the time and welcome to show. Well, pleasure. Thank you for having they appreciate it. Excellent. So, before we jump into the topic, we like to start with a question just to provide a little bit more nuance for you to our audience. So I would love to understand, you know, one passion or one hobby that you have that people that know you or that you know your professional persona would be surprised that you are passionate about. Well, I don't know if they'd be surprised because I lived my life pretty much out in the open, but I am. I am just an avid hunter and outdoorsman, so I spend a great deal of time outdoor. He may be surprised, though, that I collect a lot of first edition books really that are, yeah, that are signed, like I have every Louis Lemore book, first edition, sometimes either two or three deep, and they're all SAG and signed by Louis Lemore. I'm a I love books and I used to have like literally about seven or Eightzero of them in my library. I downsized and now I only I only keep first edition sign books or reference books that I really want to go back to. That's all I keep anymore. Wow, nice to that such a good totally digital with all your books. I kindle learn? No, I don't like I don't do that. I still like reading an old fashioned book. I do have books on Kindall and and Nook and and you know Partlan, because a lot of my book, all my books, are on those, those two those things as...

...well. So I like to support to people to support me. But I'm a paper Guy. I like to read it on paper. Well, I mean if there's there's something that for I mean from my perspective. Yeah, I would agree with one hundred percent. It's a little bit more intimate, there's a little bit more connection to the concept. There's something about that tactile feel and you know, some of the art and the way that they choose to strategically create covers and call she's are pretty interesting as well. I mean, you know I've I read my books or do the audio form, you know, whatever you call it, and narrate my own books and and you can't narrate some portions of it that you know, like a chart, write stuf to. It's tough to narrate that. So it's like okay, now in the upper right hand porter, you know, way up here, you try to describe this and it's just not the same as it when you see it and visually or whatever, and you can't. It's it's like, although it's interesting, I have signed a number of ipads and readers in my career. Really people. Yeah, people come up with their IPAD and ask you to sign it, like, okay, sure, you know you do those kind of things. But you know, I do like writing in Him. I like handing the book to someone. Almost always, will you know, I'll be on the point, I'll be reading the book or my son and I read a lot of books that are the same. We read a lot of history books, like you know, I've been re reading a book on on Jerusalem by Monton. I can't want to do I think is his name, but anyway, I've been I've been been reading. You know, we read things like that. So he and I'll read something that will pass it on. It wasn't long ago I signed them. I cite her in the in the new hero book, but about the founder of Paraos, the blood testing group that was called. The book was called bad blood, which was really good read, a really good read about deception and fraud and just just a real ass hat company. Excellent, excellent. All right, so far listeners. Now let's get a little close to the top of give him a little more context around ce sweet networks and your role there. Yeah, so I'm the chairman, I founder of CEE sweet network. Long with a couple of partners and we created our most trusted community, a sea sweet executives in the people that serve them. We're trying to be a very trusted platform. We recently picked up the asset dot CEO. So if you don't want to have your name dot CEO, it's a top level domain. We have communities, we have events, we have media. So we own C sweet TV, see Sweet Radio, Sece we book club. We now starting kicking up c Sweet Academy, see Sweet Speakers Bureau. I mean so we're really trying to be all things to the two leaders of businesses. That's our key and then we have some specialty groups like the Ai Council and all leadership councils and went women's groups, councils, leadership groups. We have the hero club, which is our most elite group of value base CEOS, which is, you...

...know what we recently wrote the book about the hero factor. So we yeah, we're just excited about all the things that we're doing and it's just growing like Ga gag busters. Have for those who hadn't heard of it before in the audience, please I highly recommend you check it out. I was doing so in preparation for this interview and it is quite an impressive collection of content and insight, so please take a look at that. Let's start with a definition of leadership, right, just set some context. I've heard hundreds of them, we probably all have. I think the one that has a tendency to stick with these leaderships the ability to convince others to give up leading themselves and follow you, which there's some truth in there, but I don't know if it's nuanced enough for today. So I'm kind of curious. How do you define leadership well, the ability to get others to follow it in a likeminded fashion. I think that's that's truly the truly what it is. It's the influence, the influence over others to make them do the things that you would like them to do. You know so, and it but always tied to some of the neet destination. You know. I think a leaders more than just an idea. It's about a place to go. It's about painting the picture. It's about being able to motivate and inspire others to do and want the same. Excellent. And in the new book. You've got a new book out the hero factor. Can you just quick overview of kind of the core concepts and what readers might expect from they pick it up? Yeah, back in one thousand nine hundred and ninety eight, gentleman by the name of Rob Bryan and sold his company for over twenty billion dollars. When he sold his company, he set aside a certain percentage for all the employees, making it the single largest number of millionaires ever created in one day. He didn't need to do it. He and his wife, Terry, was a chiefly go officer, did it and all these employees would come up to him and say, Mr Ryan, Mrs Ryan, you don't know me, but on the night watchman are on the on the you know, the janitor, and I can send my kids to college or I can pay for my wife's Mother's operation. And you know, they would say you're my hero. And so he pulled together a group of people and started to have them build on similar values and could never get it to scale. Found what we were doing with the C sweet network and it became part of the sea sweet network. We change some little bit by making an asking CEOS to sign a pledge that says, basically, you're not going to be an Asshole, that you're going to pe a real leader. You know. You know that when you do make it big, you'll remember and and you'll run your business in a hero fashion, which means a hero culture. And we find that. You Know, you know Jim Collin. Somebody's been describing the Jim Collins book good to great. This takes over after the great because it talks about the kinds of companies. The hero factor talks about the how people put people, how leaders put people over profit, and about how to change the way in which we look at the way company serve communities, cut stomers, vendors and the world. And by and large most companies do that. And this is a recognition...

...to separate those companies that rund hero cultures away from everybody else. There's a lot of different kinds of businesses. There's there's a good company, you know, just does a good job. There's the want to bees, there's the do gootders, there's the bottom liners. Then there's those ass had companies I talked about a bit earlier. You know, by the way, I picked that word so that I could say, because I used to call these companies some bad words and very derogatory language. But we all know what assets means. There's Zeros, there are losers, he's are Bertie, Madeoffs, the you know, the people that the charge, you know, exorbitant amounts for EPI pens or whatever, and and and when they don't need to. And and I try to pick a word that I could get by the censors with an asset the one. So you know, and so now and then and then in the upper right hand corner, you know can't do it the podcast. We got to pay twelve in the book or go to or go to the hero factor bookcom and I'll give you a free assessment. Free assessment you can, you could, you could test yourself, Test Your Business. But the hero companies are in the upper right hand corner highest profits, the highest revenues, the highest values of companies. And what's interesting is that hero companies just are off the charts in terms of making making more money, doing more revenue than in one in their categories, the only one in their industries in any index. And then they also have happier customers, they have happier employees and certainly more pleased vendors because they operate with great value. So it's just a way of saying, look, we're going to be there are businesses that are different than other businesses and these are the best ways. You know, I look, I bought, sold over two hundred and fifty companies of my career and billions of dollars. My last class company I was at. I managed a budget, just a budget of marketing budget or seventeen billion and I did well and I've done well. But it doesn't have to take it all. Doesn't mean I need it all, doesn't mean I need ten homes or whatever, you know, because can be comfortable and this is about recognition that there's a bigger there's a bigger play in this world than just you and a bigger play than just the bottom line and the top line. It's about, you know, doing the right things for the right reason. So it's a very value based organization. So and I'm extremely passionate about it and we've got hundreds of members now in our hero club. And this book was written as a way, as a kind of a manifesto to help leaders start to, as I say in the book, pick a side. Pick a side, say what you want to do. It's all right. So in companies today, I mean, you know we've got that. I love the asset turned. I will get the ASS that companies we've got the heroes and that's the organization as a whole. Right, and these organizations are all at some point they're going through some type of transformation. Put whatever to fire in front of a digital marketing sales or is this? Whatever it is, there's these huge investments in attempting to get these organizations to evolve, but I often see there's not enough investment in actually evolving the individuals. Leadership. Say Not at the...

...sea sweet but also throughout the organization, because leaderships not just about the sea suite. There has to be types of other leaderships throughout the organization. And what you're talking about is a you know, it's a cultural shift for many and I'm curious why you don't see what challenges you've seen in terms of these hero CEOS struggling with to push that type of leadership down into an organization. Well, it starts from the beginning and it's start. That's why I'm saying you got to pick a side. You have to decide what you want to be. You don't just wake up overnight. I mean you can, just takes a while. Culture is something that develops. Culture something that starts at the beginning. You know, it's tough to do the right things all the time, but it's the right thing, and so when you find that you start practicing these things right from the start, makes it easier over time because it becomes part of the culture. Culture will eat. Will you know execution and strategy for watch man? I mean it just does. I mean if you have a bad culture, I don't give a crap how much money you have, a much time you have out, how good your product is. It you can be crushed by it, and I've seen it time and time again, you know, and companies that maybe they're bought, sold or, you know, brought in to help, help build. So you have to make it from the beginning. And so so leaders have to say no, we're going to be inclusive, we're going to be diverse in thought, in people, on the way in which we do things. We're going to be transparent. You know, we're going to talk about the elephants in the room, we're going to talk about, hey, someone can raise their hand when they see a problem along the line, you know, in a production line or whatever it might be, and where you find you have those cultures that operate like that. Hell, that's leadership, man. That's right there. You just said it. You know, it's there and it's from the top down. That hit the biggest problem that most companies have about leadership. Twenty eight percent of the people who work at companies don't even know what the company stands for. It's that's just nuts that almost thirty percent of the people who work in a company don't know what the companies dance for. So how about make sure that you know what you know? I just by the way. I read that in my own book. I put that in my own book and I'm doing the Audio version of the book and I'm going all, we crap, I'm not worthy, you know, meaning, you know, I was sitting there, you know, reading, you know again, reading my own stuff out loud. I got very emotional book, because the books got some very emotional pieces to it. But but I was sitting there going in mind, living up to the two values of my own stuff that I'm talking about, and in the answer is no, because you never live to the true value, just like a devout Christian who believes he's not, you know, good enough for God right. It's the same thing. So so you constantly try to live a better life, and that's what I think hero leaders do every day. How can I make it better? How much? How can I make this better and better and better and better? And so when I was reading the book again, I went, oh my gosh, I got to get the team together, and I did, you know, first...

...week of generous said look, we get it. Every really read the book again, you know, and let's take the a esseman together. Let's go through this. And Are we? Are we living up to what we want to do in the sea sweet network, for instance, and the team said, no, that's you're right, you're not. Okay, so, and you know. So, how do we change that? Right, you know how we how do we get better? And of course, immediately, immediately, everybody was bet it was in a better mood. Everybody was was coming to me with this idea of this thing, all because we got clarity around what we stand for and so and that was it was so cool. That was so cool. That was cool. That was cool to do that, though. You're talking about, I would say, you know, based on the experience I've had in multinationals down to start ups, you're talking about individuals that have to be fairly well, I don't want to say grounded, let's say yeah, great, God, grounded a good word. I think you're exactly right. Grounded in center. You have to be comfortable. You have to be comfortable with the uncomfortable. Right, great, great, you know what I mean? Because because they're gonna say stuff to you, and they do, and they and they did. Where I where my first reaction sometimes, and I look, I'm a very emotional guys. Just want to punch the person in the throne of right. So, so so you can't. You, you know, like you like you can't do that right, because I'm a competitor and you're saying my stuff doesn't work right, or my stuff isn't good, or or our company. You know, we suck, we're doing a terrible job at it, even when we're doing like we're growing up four percent, like we're doing. You know. So when someone says that to you, it's not easy, right, you know, Cheah, that's what you're getting too. Yeah, it takes it take it takes someone who says keep breath. Okay, thank you, you know. And by the way, an assessment by another individual doesn't mean it's right or wrong. It just means it's their assessment. Sure, so now. So, now let's have a discussion, and that's that's the kind of things I talked about in the book. Let's let's have healthy debate about it, because you say that it sucks. Does it really suck? Is Anyone going to die? You know? So, so then we and then I got it. We go back and forth until we come to this realization of what maybe the real truth is, or what we receive to be the real truth is, or the real situation of what it is. And so, yeah, it's not easy to do it's not easy to do that. Let's be clear. If it was easy, I say this all time, but it was easy, everybody would do it. Right, really know you. I said, that's it's all. Yeah, yeah, it's right. Right, it's difficult, it's hard and and and you have, I like that phrase I just said a minute ago. You have to be comfortable with the uncomfortable. Yeah, and that's I mean. So, when we think about that, individuals, individuals that end up in leadership positions. I've known some that I would, you know, I'd follow to the ends of the Earth because I got we were doing, and then some that, you know, it took about seventy two hours when you go no way in Hell and jump ship. And so you...

...mentioned. You know, you got to pick a side. Sometimes you can do it just wake up overnight. It's got to be easier. Maybe it's not easy. Maybe some different kinds of challenges. If you set out from the beginning, the birth of a company, and you pick a side, versus say, a company like, I don't know, Amazon, Jeff Wakes up one morning and says, okay, we're going to switch and now we're you know now I'm picking this side. Does that type of switching those organizations that are already existing? Have you seen that actually create friction or disturbances? Or because they pick a side, do you see the same result you saw when your team sat down for the sea sweet network? You know, you know it's because if you're if you're constantly moving and they don't know where you're going, to try to anticipate where it's going, where it's going and you still won't get there. So it has to be a shared understanding. So everybody's getting are you. Can you change it? Now, the bigger you get, the harder it is. Right, just steer the ship for change it. I mean, you know, I was a jeep marketing up ship, CODEC you know, to try to turn the culture of that company was like, Oh my God, every day was like, you know, I felt better when I would bang my head up against a wall and then have someone throw the wall at my head. Note. So it was. It was just tough. But you know, I love the people and I still love what they originally intended to do. They just couldn't we couldn't make the shift, you know, we couldn't realize that we weren't about a film company. We were, you know, a company that that make, makes, manage and moves images and information, where we were an emotional technology company. That's where they were. But, you know, but the word became we were a film company, and once that, once everybody drink that cool way, it was up to get get it squished. So you almost have to. You have to strip it down right and then remake it or or drive it out. I mean that's why it's you know, a lot of times when you take over a company, you got to change its name. You have to, you know, because a lot of people would say, Hey, where the creole people? Or were they? We were this company. I we see that a little bit in united and Continental, right. You know, there's the continental. I used to make me really upset when they first merged. For the first year they'd say where United? You're on a united flight with a continental crew. Oh Man, you know that ain't going to work right. That's not going to work. And and you know, I even had some I even called up the leadership of the company and who, you know, friends of mine and said you're going to have problems, you're going to have problems of this get they keep saying that. First of all, they divide its device it to, you know, customers, not to mention the employees. And imagine you have one united crew member on with that continental crew. How do they feel? It's just bad, you know, and so and so they're you know, those kind of things. You have to kind of you have to like suck up and go. So, you know, that's why I say pick a side, and you got to get ray else to pick a side and if you don't believe it, get the hell out right. I think that's a lot of easile with that.

Oh Yeah, well, let's see. You know, I remember going to the Kodek what they had said. I can only move as my slowest tomb denominating and so in the marketing is as we change. And what we've got to do. We've got to move this money below the line, above the line. We're going to make this to happen. We got to do this. Here's the direction we're going. And for those who you don't believe, I will hunt you down, I will tell you, and I said that, I said I will find you, I will ask you to leave this company. I said we will love you, we will love you, but we will miss you. And and and I meant it, and I went around all the time looking for people who wouldn't do it, because if you wherever, you find that that one resistance, that to resistance. And by the way, you it's more than one or two. A third of the people get it right away. It is my rule of thirds, third on everything. I don't care what you're doing. Okay, a third. A third of the people get it right away. The third eventually get it in a third never do. Start replacing the third as soon as possible because they are going to drive your company down. Well, there's a constant turn right, like. I mean that you always you're always going to have that. So it's a constant. It's not a destination, it's a journey. And a lot of people today get distracted right and yeah, I joke with our clients that your sales reps are ending up watching cat videos on facebook when they were supposed to be doing research on a k. They get distracted. It's it's amazing how hard it can be to stay focused into stay diligent. Is there something that you see in leaders or individuals that predisposes them to have that type of focus and commitment. I don't know. Hang on, I was just watching a cat video. No, hi. I think that they they have a higher sense of purpose, okay, and and I think that they it's an innatance in them that was, you know, born. And then I think we're all born with the same thing. I think we're all born with the same capabilities. I think because of the way we're socialized in our lives, we rise to it quicker. But I don't I don't know anyone that you know in their life wakes up and says I can't wait to be stupid. You know. So, so you know, I don't care who you are. I don't think anyone does that. But I do think we're all. We're all. We all get wired and the electricity runs through US different ways and so certain things turn on for certain people faster or better than others. And so I you know, I do believe that there's a sense of purpose for most, most of those leaders. Now it could be a bad purpose or good purpose. You know, let's be clear. I mean, just like I told you earlier, we got asset companies, you got hero companies, you got you got do gooders. Do good or sue man. They want to do everything. They want to do it right for the right reasons, but they couldn't make a profit out of a web paper SEC.

So you know, and and they're do good or companies. They just keep trying, but they'll never make money. And then there's there's the bottom liners. You know, bottom line or these are these are great companies. They the Gees, the walmarts. You know, they're they're making good money. They focus on the bottom line, but you know, they got no soul. Right, they got no soul. I mean, I'm not and I'm not knocking them and I like I I say in this in the hero factor book. I'm not knocking him. I said pick up a pick a side beside what the hell you want to be. And and I think, well, the leaders can make those determinations felling quickly. And so for individuals themselves, you know, we've heard you mentioned a lot of things. Pick a side, you know, break free from the past kind of stuff. If they were like one big point that you believe in individual listening, could internalize, that would put them on the right path through either at least picking a side, regardless of whether it's ass hat or hero any advice or guidance you could give to anybody who need that that decision. Two things. One is conditions as satisfaction. You know, really sitting down and understanding your can distance satisfaction for you personally or or for the business. What is it you want to stand for? What is it you want to do? What is it you know you want to leave as your legacy, or what is it you want to have people say about you? What is it you want to drive in terms of profit? What is it that you you know, want to use the profit for? Whatever? What's the condition of satisfaction? I don't think. I think we get the enamored. We just say, Oh, what's run a business. Then we start figure, as we got man the side up front, because if you decide up front, that becomes the filter and the thing of which you drive all things through. But you know, I don't want to work with assholes right. That's one of the rule. I mean leave our Burton. Leave our Burton. Put that out there. By the way. I give leave our credit for them here and mark will, mark wils of production, producer, did a little the terminator in a bunch of other ones and they, he and lave ore were partners love our Burton actor and Reading Rainbow and I was backstage with the one place at some point and I usually don't go out and listen to a lot of other speakers, but I really liked mark a lot. Could it's kind up a smart assid and I love Lave Oar because you just he's just a genuine good soul. I mean the guys just he's just a genuine good soul and he's a real family guy, loves his mother and you know, it's just it really comes through. And so they I went out there. First leg was we don't work with assholes. So I may not love these guys. Are Up to that, you know. You know I want to I want to build well, you know personally, if I look at my own I want to build wealth because that's how we keep scoring that sow. And I'm not tough. My didn't have to be just money, but you know that there's a big piece of it. I want to have my children, my grandchildren and their children have a better start at than I had, without a question or that my grandmother had. You know, both my grandfather and grandmother. You know we're Real Manuel Labor is my dad, my mom or hard you know, I was the first one to go to college, those that kind...

...of thing. So I want I want something better. So that way. So the second is I want to learn things, I want to I want to be challenged, I want to know how to do things differently and continue that. You know, people always ask me, Jeff, you know what, what's the what's the worst mistake you ever made? So I don't know, I haven't done it yet. You know. You know, so meeting, there's a big one coming, man, they're still coming, and or a big success. You know, some it is. What's the best thing? Everything, I don't know. I haven't done it yet. So that's kind of how I look at it. And then if the third thing is I want to have fun, I want to enjoy it, I want to do something that, even if I can get paid for it, I'd want to do it right. And so that's for me. So what are yours? So what are your conditions aspection? So that's and then the second one I mentioned is focus and focus on it and spend every dying minute doing it and doing it. I mean for the last hour and a half I've been doing invitations to an event that I'm going to go do for can I want to make sure they have a really good turn up and so you know. So here I am going through nine hundred and forty five linkedin connections in the area to see who I should invite. One by one by one, I did them. You know, that's focus, man, and are you willing to do that? Here it is. You know, we're recording this other on a Saturday morning. You know right now. You know that. It's an interesting point because I think there are many people and I don't know if it's generational, I don't I think that's maybe sometimes too easy to wipe it off, the generational differences, but I see a lot of I want it all and I want it now. Not to quote a Queen Song, but I mean I think there's a lack of there's a lack of understanding that the journey requires effort and yeah, in order to get where you want to be, first off you need to know where you want to go, which is you knows. But no, I don't see a lot of people taking the time to do that, which is unfortunate. Well, you know, we'd love to take a pill or you know or whatever in an instantly. It does, but you know, I look, I found that an idea with other what an idea without implementation is nothing but air. And that's the difference between most people who want to want it and those who deliver it and do it. And Yeah, I don't I think a lot of people don't realize how freaking hard it really is. And it's a man, it's a struggle. I it takes a lot of time. But again, if you go back to if you're doing if you're heading towards your purpose, you understand what you know, you're conditions are, then is it really that hard? I mean it's just effort. Like this, between effort and and struggles. Does that make sense? You know? Without question? I yeah, yeah, that's true. I agree with you. There you can. I love effort, don't you? I mean I like so I have a place out in South Dakota. I like to get home back there as much as I can and I really like to get out on my four war where I like to grab the chain saw, I like to do all the stuff and I'm alling...

...logs and, you know, doing brush and doing it and afterwards, man, I you could, I could drop. Sometimes I just lay on the ground after them. Soo sweaty, so hot that I just would like my wife to come out with the Hu Garden. I just always me down right and then, and then let me just lay here, you know. And but don't you feel great? Oh yeah, exactly, exacts, amazing, exactly. So there's the difference between, you know, struggling and effort, right, yeah, I mean there's a there's a little bit harder and intrinsic there's an intrinsic reward for it, right, even if it is even if there's pain, even if I'm gonna hurt, hurt the next day. Let's be clear, because I have one out of shape guy and I am going to hurt. It's every joint in my body. It's going to hurt. I'm going to go. So I'm going to point to that. Booba would say that was that was a long perfect all right. So let's change direction a little bit. We ask all over, I guess, kind of standard questions the end of each interview. The first is simply, as a revenue executive yourself, you're running see sweet networks. This means you are a prospect for sales professionals. I want to get in front of you help our audience understand. If somebody doesn't have a referral, they don't have, you know, the easy way, which is referral. Some of the trust. What is the thing that they can do that captures our attention and builds credibility the fastest? Don't waste my freaking time. So here's the deal. You look, I am the most accessible person there is the world. I put my email out there, myself, phone know out there everything. When I was a chief marketing obser Beas mccause. I'm gonna give you a great example. Sales people, listen to this. Listen, all right, so one and now. I drink coffee today because I really like him. And back then, and didn't you go off with someone? Rite me, Hey, I want to haven. We have a cup of coffee. No, I don't drink coffee, so shut up. No, so what do you what is that about? All right, don't do that, or the guy would then call, call, or right and say, Hey, I want to save you hundreds of dollars in your sales process. Dude, I run a budget of seventeen billion dollars sales and marketing and you want to save me hundreds of dollars. You've just wasted my freaking time just making me read the stupid email. So I I remember responding back to this guy because I knew who he was and he will look in mini amplest of the time, and he was a sales and marketing executive and consultant trying to sell a product. And I wrote back in the said listen, I really got to have a higher target than hundreds of dollars for my sales guys. So he wrote back faut thousands. I said again, let these be clear. Okay, I if you, if you want to talk millions with Zeros behind it, I am very interested in what you have to say. Now here's what I'm going to ask you, because you're probably going to come back and tell me that you can add the Zeros. I respect you for that, because one zero and adding six years no difference. It's just scale. Okay, so I agree with you. All right. Now tell me what, what specific you know,...

...expertise do you have in our industry or with the types of salespeople that we have that would lead me to believe that you can deliver on that promise. Right and I never heard. I never heard from the guy again. So so my point is show me the value. You know what your one hundred and eighteen? What's Your Elevator Pitch? You got eight seconds to capture my attention. I know that to be true because that's the average intentions bet of an adult. Right. So, booming, eight seconds. What you got? Tell me what you got and then then then tell me the value you're going to give to me. Don't tell me you work with this company, this company, this company. I don't give a rats rear it. But you, if you tell me what value you do ever for me specifically. Man, I'm paying attention. I'm not getting off the elevator, I'm you and I are riding up that elevator up and down all day. So you know if that's the case. But but most people there it's too generic, it's to bullshit, it's to to blah, blah, blah, right and in most too sweet executives. I don't have time for that crap. I don't have time to teach you how to sell to me. So that's it exactly. I love it. I love it perfect all right. Last question. We call our acceleration insight. One thing, one piece of advice you could tell a sales marketing professional service person. One piece of advice you give any professional out there that you believe, if they internalized, would help them hit their targets or accomplish her goals? What would it be? In why? Work harder than anybody else, be the hardest working and most successful, assessible person there is out there. That's it. So that's a meat. It's really that simple. Yeah, you get out, you out hustle, you can out a hustle and I look, I'm not the smartest guy. I might be the best look at, but I'm not all right now. But I tell you what, no one will outwork me. Okay, and you heard me. I'm sitting here doing letters right. I'll be doing that tonight, I'll be doing that tomorrow. I'll be writing notes all the time, I'll be sending an emails, I'll be saying I'll be doing whatever. You know, said a personal note. I see, I see something, reminded and said to the guy that you know. I just know he's getting a divorce from his family. I know he's lonely and I just say, hey, thinking about you, man. Right. So, you know, whatever, be the hardest working guy out there so that people know if you the go to person you know. And here's the other one. I'll give you one more. It's all right. The more you give, the more you get, right. That's the other piece. I'm a giver and but I'm also take her look, I will take your money, but but I will get I will give to you, and that's that's the other thing. People know I will I and I only ask for anything for what can I help you with? And I really have that. I try to live that serman mentality, because it comes back to it always does. Yeah, I agree, one hundred percent, one hundred percent. Thanks all. So, if somebody wants to get in touch with you today, the hits, sweet networks, Linkedin, what works best for you? Everything, just go, I mean we just finally, yeah, it's it's Hazel H Y Zldt,...

Jeffrey Haze. Look, you can find me on Linkedin. Linkedin with me, or send me an email message or inmail messenger, or or you know, Findmai on my website. I'm accessible, Excellenti if I can't thank you enough for taking the time to be on the show, especially on a Saturday. That's a lot of fun. I enjoy it actually. Yet yeah, let's let's definitely do it again, because this is this has been a great I've truly enjoyed this, this conversation with this morning. All right, everybody that does it for this episode, check us out of BB REV exaccom. Share the episode of Friends, families, Co workers, if you like what you here to be favorite right as a review on itunes. And until next time, we have value selling associates. With you all nothing but the greatest success. You've been listening to the BB revenue executive experience. To ensure that you never miss an episode, subscribe to the show and Itunes or your favorite podcast player. Thank you so much for listening. Until next time,.

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