The B2B Revenue Executive Experience
The B2B Revenue Executive Experience

Episode · 4 years ago

Kevin Dorsey on 3 Tips for Creating a Sales Culture that Sells

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Businesses are complicated entities with a lot of moving parts, any of which are indispensable to making sure that things run smoothly and that the revenue continues to flow inward.

But, there is one department that is impossible to ignore when trying to sell a product: Sales.

A bit obvious perhaps, but as many can attest, developing an effective sales team can be like fumbling in the dark for a light switch that you’re only 90% sure is actually on the wall nearby. And a lot of that uncertainty is caused by the culture of the company or the sales team.

How exactly do you develop a sales culture that brings in results?

In this episode, Kevin Dorsey, VP of Sales Development and Enablement for SnackNation, offers a wide range of tips for creating a dynamic sales team by explaining how the salespeople at SnackNation have grown and developed a sales culture that sells.

Are you concerned about hitting your revenuetargets this month, quarter or year? Your answer is value prime solutions,a sales training and marketing optimization company leveraging the value selling framework. visit wwwdot value prime solutionscom and start accelerating your results. You're listening to the BBrevenue executive experience, a podcast dedicated to helping the executives train their sales andmarketing teams to optimize growth. Whether you're looking for techniques and strategies or toolsand resources, you've come to the right place. Let's accelerate your growth inthree, two, one. Welcome everyone in to the BB revenue executive experience. I'm your host, Chad Sanderson. Today we have with US Kevin Dorsey, vice president of sales, development enablement for snack nation. Now, forthose out there that are unaware of what snack nation is, as a personwho has been lucky enough to work at an office where we had snag nationprovided, it is a rapidly growing company focused on delivering healthy snacks that Naveland create awesome office environments, I can speak to this first hand. Everytime that box would show up, it became a community event, which,in and of itself would be a reason to have Kevin on the show,but if anybody's, you know, paying attention to social media linkedin things ofthat nature, they also know that Kevin is an extremely well respected sales leaderand he's done some amazing things at stag nation. So we wanted to havehim on the show and I want to welcome Kevin and thank you for yourtime. Absolutely, Chad, happy to be on here with you. Iappreciate the kind words on Snag Nation. We definitely do our best. Thecustomer service is second to none in my experience and having a, let's say, a wife who was the office Admin, office exact assistant, is very,let's a particular hearing a rave about it and then experiencing it firsthand hasjust been great for us. So typically, at the front of the show welike to do kind of it's an odd question, but we want toget as much value as possible for our listeners. We ask our guests ifyou look back over your career, was there a defining moment or something thathappened maybe change the trajectory of your career that you took some lessons away from? If you kind of share what that was and what those lessons are.We'd love to hear it. Absolutely and it. I mean that's actually aneasy one for me. So it would have been Cheez maybe ten years ago. Maybe ten years ago, one of my very early, and I'm actuallymy first mentor, David Babarrow, handed me a book called thinking girl richand he said, if you are serious about being successful, read this bookand then we can talk. And so I read read the book in liketwo days and that was the first time I can say in my life thatI finally understood that I was actually in control of my own destiny and success. That success didn't happen to me, I made success happen and that asslutely changed my life. I became a...

...voracious reader and learner. After thatit became a goal set are. After that write in my goals down clearmission statements, purpose statements, and then that has transformed my career and mylife in more ways than I can even count. Actually, the personal ownershipof one's faith is something that as you get older it kind of becomes alittle more obvious, but if you get that earlier on in your life itcan make some serious differences to the rejectory or not only your career but yourpersonal selfdevelopment. Absolutely. So how about we domine into the kind of thenormal stuff and a little background on your role at snack nation? Sure so. I mean that's, at the end of the day, really started withhuman. So extat nation came from human and human stood for helping unite mankind of nutrition, and so I oversaw the sales team for a human whichwas healthy vending machines, helping markets for schools, corporations, offices around thecountry, and we had this kind of crazy idea about maybe putting some snacksin a box and see if people would pay for that. Because if welooked at you know, if you look at trends, we saw eighty ninetypercent of the inbound leads that came to our website, we're all smaller officesthat were too small for vending machines, are too small for markets, butwe're still there was a need there and so we decided to put snacks inthe box and to people will buy it. And not only did it work,it worked really, really well. And then they asked me to tryto grow out that team and, as I give me three reps in threemonths to it see if we can make it repeatable. So it doesn't matterif only I or my cowork at the time, John Dinto, if we'rethe only ones that can sell it, it doesn't work. So it tookthree months to kind of put that process together and it worked and we havenever looked back. And so that's, you know, kind of how itcame to be. Well, in the growth has been pretty, I'm prettyamazing. If I remember Carl, you said you went from thirty two andfifty reps and something like eighteen months. Yeah, I mean we're just overfifty now and coming up on three years. So we have, I mean zeroto fifty and under three and then, yeah, we went from twenty tofifty and almost twelve months. So they very, very fast scale excellent. So when you look at that team, as you know, you had yourfirst three Reps. you prove that it was viable, that the themarket would respond. I'm curious when you start looking at those reps and startedassessing, you know, how to scale it and grow. We were thefirst things. We're the first places you looked in order to make it,you know, repeatable and scalable. Opportunity Creation. So could we consistently createqualified opportunities and then looking at those conversion rates and figure out, okay,what are the pain points that we are actually solving, what questions do weneed to be asking to expose some of those gaps or pain points, andwhat I believed to be a consistent and doable conversion rate metric. And wewere able to figure that out over three months in terms of what to expectand then every decision we've made since then about how to maintain that, becauseit a he's used to be full cycle pan. It was, you know, eighty percent outbound sales. We that...

...introduce strs after about a year anda half, brought revenue up even higher per rep and now our inbound channelis started to catch up to the outbound. So now we're actually doing just asmuch inbound revenues we are outbound, whereas for the first two and ahalf years it was like seventy thirty outbound, two inbound. So it continues toevolve, but we pay attention to the pipeline creation and conversion rates acrossall of our verticals, all of our markets, all of our channels,and make all decisions around trying to keep those where we want them to be. And so when you look at creating the structure that you can plug,say, you know, strs are reps into. That's create. You know, that's step one. How do you fout? You figure that out,how your structure it. But when you bring reps in, I mean you'vebeen pretty prolific on linkedin about, you know, on boarding reps and howthat works. And I think there's a red notebook or file folder that theycarry around, right, so everybody knows it's the doverything is in genius.Then some kind of cares when, when you bring on those that many newreps, what kind of things do you find in the reps from a skillset standpoint that you have to focus on in terms of skill set development?Or characteristics I look for in a rep? Oh, let's do let's do both. Okay, all right, I'll go. I'll go characteristics first.Characteristics. Top for a look for an all reps grit, self, awareness, adaptability and curiosity. Okay, those are my top for and because Ibelieve they have those for the skill sets that I want to teach them.It works because I want to teach them to ask great questions. If you'rea curious person, you naturally ask more and better questions. That's why it'sa quality I look for. Prospecting is not easy, it is hard.That's why they need to be gritty and that's I mean and notice and Itell us the people. I did not say anything about hard work in thecharacteristics of the people I look for, because I think hard work is veryeasy to fake. I don't think most people understand where it really means.That's why I use grit, telling by the Times you worked hard when thingswere Shitty, right, the Times you worked hard when things weren't going well. You know and talk about that great and so that falls into our prospecting. We're growing so fast that they need to be adaptable, not coachable.There's a big difference between adaptable and coachable. coachable requires you to be coached.I have to tell you to change your behavior. Adaptable is you recognizewhat's happening and change your approach because of it. I need adaptable people becausewe're going to continue to change as we grow, and that all funnels intoself awareness. What's working, what's not? Where is my performance? What amI good at? What am I bad at? So the reps canactually control some of their own destiny in terms of they should be coming tome saying, Kevin, I am struggling at the coaching section of my callsand I would like help getting better at it. And so it all funnelsfrom those characteristics for me. And so when you look at structuring the teamyou mentioned, you know, going from just the three reps to St oursand it used to be full cycle a sales how do you decide on thatstructure? You know, why was it a focus point for you? Becausesome of the most important metrics I tracks...

...started to slip. So the firstyear, you know, it's a blue ocean for us. We find it. We didn't just go after anybody, everybody. We didn't technically even haveto be that good, but you know, we were good, but we didn'thave to be right. You could go after anyone, and so thatwas fine. After about a year and a half, one of the firstmetrics I talked about, Opportunity Creation, really started to slide. On theAE side. It wasn't as easy to prospect anymore right. We couldn't justload up big lists and go. And so in the opportunity creation starts toslide. So then of course, does revenue and conversion ray start to slidebecause people started getting looser with their qualification, you know, process, because theyjust wanted to hit their often numbers. So, looking at that, wesaid, all right, if we can introduce SDRs in and that itstill makes financial sense. So even once we put SDRs intoo the world,my ae still had the prospect. They just didn't have to prospect as much. And so then we were able to add in the str role, replacethe pipeline that we were losing and then also increase the amount of revenue wewere getting her ae to make sure that that cost made sense. So yousaid something really interesting that I want. I want to go back to thethat even though there were strs, they still had the prospect. That wasI did a Webinar yesterday on prospecting. I actually gave you a shout outas an example of phenomenal emails and sent a whole bunch of people to dolinked in profile for those emails that you guys publish out there. I'm curiousdo you work with the a's and the strs on different types of prospecting wherethey both using the same approach? I mean, how does that differ.Maybe it's just a volume level. I'm just kind of curious. Yeah,it's more volume level and targeting. So yes, the approach and the trainingin the process are the same, but my ae's and now, as they'vebeen doing more in bound be a he's are doing less and less prospecting.But like for most of last year, they's were targeting larger companies to prospectbecause I view if you're going to make twenty opportunities for yourself in a month, they'll make them small. So they were going after some of the larger, N even larger, just like not the small, the strs. Youknow, hit the whole GAM it across the board. Okay, excellent.And so are they both enabled with the same technology stack? I'm going tobe curious to know kind of what that stack looks like and what you foundto be most effective. Yes, they they are. They both have likeno, we have our entire prospecting system and outreach. We use outreach andsales loft and we have and have cadences for everything, personas what their painpoints are, missed, follow up call. I mean we have a sequence foreverything. So you're going after a larger company, that's you know hassnacks already, there's a sequence for that. If you don't know they have snacks, there's a sequence for that. If it was an old inbound leadand we're retargeting, there's a see sequence for that. So the whole thewhole process is there to be followed.

Then it's on the reps determine whothey're plugging into those different processes and running with it. So that yeah,how often do you go back and look at like the effectiveness of particular elementsof the Caden? So you know, but maybe it's called scripts, maybeit's the email content that's going out. Do you have a process for kindof that constant evolution and agility of those cadences? Yes, so it usedto be monthly and then we would split test. I would split test anew email for almost every step, almost every single month. Can I bean open rate by half a percent? Can I increase response rate by tenpercent and CD if we can beat it, we even run contest with the reps, you know, called like beat the mean, like. So ofthe REP wants to rewrite an email, it has to beat mine. Ifit's like if it's not going to be mine, no, you can't haveit in the sequence. It doesn't matter. So but like we'll put those thingsout there for people, and so yes, and then it got toa point where we were seeing almost no improvements and certain areas, and soit moved to like a bimonthly review of like, okay, if it's maintainingwhere it's at right now, that's okay, and then looking like squeeze things out. But a good example we had this was two and a half yeah, two and a half months ago, like emails number like five and sixin our sequence had very low response right. So I don't expect high response rateto that point in time, but they were very low, like inthe one and a half to two percent range. I just had to paya lot of attention to them because, you know, the earlier emails arewhere the most the Ash. It happened right, took a couple days,put out some rewrites and split tested them and doubled up response rates in aweek, you know, so taking them from like, you know, threeto six and two twenty four. I know exactly what that means now dollarsand sense for the company. And we just continue to refine it. Excellentexcellent, is it? You know, one of the things that I againsounds like I'm probably stalking you on linked then, but your stuff shows upin it and it resonates so much. I saw you did a day,a call day, where the picture at least was the reps standing up attheir desk, and when we work with clients that's one of the first thingswe try and tell people's like your physicality matters, right, your your attitude, smile, stand up, be active, you be in your body and bepresent. I'm kind of curious. Did you just figure that out orhow did you? How did you come across kind of your best practices forgettingpeople over their fear of the phone? Well, I guess those are verydifferent questions. I agree with your body. You know, physicality matters, butI believe it's comfort matters. There are people that absolutely are looser onthe phones when they're sitting and leaning back, and then there are people that soundlast lacks it days ago when they're sitting and leaning back. So theyneed to stand. So it's more so like what body position allows you asa person to bring the best side of view out? I'm a spas right, I gotta stand my hands are movement. I'm all over the place. I'mprobably like swinging something, like I'm all over the place. Some ofmy other reps like they are much more...

...comfortable in themselves. When are intheir chair leaning back, hands are still up and moving, but they're notstanding because when they stand they get tense and they lean over things. SoI'm more so about finding what works best for you, but I do believethe physicality is there. Now on how to get people over their fear ofthe phones, one I mean I address that in the hiring process, likeI'm going to do everything I can to figure out, like, if youhave that fear already and in a little bit almost like try to scare youout of it. Like you you don't have a choice. If you're notgoing to make your like, if you're not going to make your dial scared, this just isn't the place for you, period. You know. So Iget ahead of it there. But then I firmly believe that fear comesfrom a lack of knowledge and confidence. If you know what you're supposed todo, there's nothing to be afraid of, and I think so many just salespeople in general, don't really know what they're supposed to do or thescripts that they're given don't really work. Like it's a script, but itit doesn't work, and so now they're forced to do something that either theyknow doesn't work but they don't have a better solution. So now they livein a state of fear all the time of picking up that phone. Sothat's why we do so much training and so much like education and knowledge baseduffhere. Is If you know what to do and you know what objections you'regoing to run into and you know how to handle them, there's nothing tobe afraid ups. And if you are still afraid of it, then youjust shouldn't be in sales. And that's okay, right, you know whatI'm saying, like it's okay, like I'm not trying to bash people,just like if you still have that fear and you still have it, that'sjust not the right role for you and that's all right, and I'll tryto either find something better for you or, you know, we help you,know, find what a better career path would be. So I believefear is trumped by confidence and training. I really do that. It's animportant point. It's and it's interesting right. It's snack nation's grown so fast andyou guys have have a very focus on sales, enablement, on training, getting those refs to be as effective and as powerful as they can be. It's something that you don't see is in in as many organizations as youwould expect. At least some of that. I honestly it's what keeps me employed. But I'm kind of curious where that came from for snack nation.Why the focus from Day One? Was it's part of the culture, orwas it, you know, something that everybody knew was necessary? I mean, I think a lot of that. I'm just trying how to say thisabout sounding like really, I guess, really egotistical, but I can't findwhat I like. It's so more than everyone was. Like. Education's veryimportant to me just as an individual, and so I believe my own Divielement is so important. That passes down Sean Kelly, Andy Mackinson, RyanSchneider, like our C sweet. They are all very, very into selfdevelopmentand it just trickles down, you know.

So it wasn't it wasn't ever reallya choice, you know, it's just who we were as individuals andwe just took it from there. So you go to you talked to anyleader at this company, any leader at this company, if they are VPlevel, they are all obsessive on their own personal development and then it justtrickles down to their teams, because it's not just the sales team. IRemember Success Team, Chelsea, same way, books on our desks reviewing things withtheir teams, weekly trainings that they do it, they're marketing, AndyMackinson taking his team to conferences like it's just an obsessive culture we have hereand we just were lucky enough to find enough people like us to put itall together. Excellent, excellent. And so when you look back over yourtime at snack nation and everything you've accomplished, what are you the what are youthe proudest though? What do you feel had the most significant impact?I would say I'll actually can. I'll tell a story here, one ofthe proudest moments I have to date. It was, I think August orSeptember of last year, and I mean we like, especially like all oflast year. I mean we hit goal. That's what we do, and normallywe hit goal two to three days before the end of the month.So every extra is just padding we bring that Gong. That's just how wegot down. And it is September and it was the last day of themonth and it was like three o'clock and we were still like k short ofour goal and you know, the team starting to get a little bit nervousaround us. And one of our reps, like Jenny, brings in a Kdeal. Then Jordan pops another K deal. We got K and it'slike forty five and Chrissie steel brings in like a threezero dollar deal with fifteenminutes left in the day to take us over goal. Now then, ifyou can see that I'm getting goosebumps telling the story because of like what happenedwhen she brought in that deal. She got mocked like the entirely, theentire a team goes and tackles are people are like yelling and screaming and hugging. And the thing is, Chad, no one on that sales team madea dime more for US hitting gold. Nothing. There was no incentive there, there was no you get a bonus check, like there were people thatare already a hundred twenty percent of goal calling other people's old lost opportunities likethat. That moment will stick with me for so long because I was proudof the culture we created, that that they cared about the team and theycared about that number more than the individual. That, that, to me,will always be one of my proudest moments. And I guess it's noteven my moment technically, right. I just got to I got to watchit happen and that that to me, will always be a highlight of mycareer here. That's a great story. And then I joked yesterday with somebodythat, you know, friends don't let friends prospect alone, right, becausethere's power and doing it in a team environment and celebrating that stuff with youknow each other, the wins, the...

...losses, the you know, wejoke with with one client. You know they have a board where they readup the best objection somebody got for the day. You know, maybe it'swhere they were told to go and how to get there, but you know, whatever it is, you want to celebrate those and come together as ateam. That's a very powerful set up. So I'm glad to hear that it'sworking well for you guys. Absolutely so. When let's talk a littlebit about forecast accuracy, you had a lot of movement, a lot ofcalls. I'm curious, is the tool stack or your process more to creditfor forecast accuracy, or is that something that maybe he's not a problem,maybe you've already figured out and doubt that in I just keep hearing that alot from other clients. Man, if you know someone that has eighty forecastingdown to a science, you let me know what I guess. What I'vegotten down to a science is the discount I apply to people's forecast. They'resaying bad. It's actually it's not a sandbag. It's happy ears. Right, Kevin, I got T K closing tomorrow. Okay, so let's talkabout the six thousand dollars it's actually coming in. Where is it coming infrom? Right? So we do have technology, right, like we usesales for us, there are certain fields and stages that need to be applied. We use things like inside square also. That does some very cool things aroundforecasting. At the end of the day, the number one the numberone thing that we found to determine forecast accuracy is call quality. How welldid that actual pitch and recommendation call go? Because no technology, trump's a badpitch call period and so that's why we do the call scoring. That'swhy the managers we have, we really push the a managers to be onthe front end of deals, not the end of the deals. I knoweveryone has different sales processes, but for our sale there's nothing you can doat the end right. The manager can't step in on the last closing callto help close that deal. The decisions already been made. It's the pitchcall, it's the recommendation call. That's where they need to get involved.So we actually have reporting that shows all the large opportunities that got created ina day so that the managers can get the reps ready for the pitch call. Once it's in the pipeline, Chad like it's it's done. It's inthe pipeline right. There's there's very little that's actually going to occur at thatpoint that's going to make or break that deal. It's all what happens onthe front it. So that's what affects our forecasting. And so then wehave reps like they have a weekly commit that they put in. And thenthe questions always will why, why is this on here? Why do youbelieve it's going to close and why do you believe it's going to close forthat amount? And why is this person going to buy? I and sowe've gotten forecasting, you know, into that way. But then, ofcourse I still apply a little bit of a discount because sales people are optimistics, which is cool, like it's cool, but you know, that's you know, that's where we're at now. And so when you look at kindof snack nation and your the biggest target...

...for you guys right now, isit more revenue, top line, revant generation? Is A market share acquisition? What's the biggest challenge for snack nation as a whole? Man, Iguess it's obviously it's new acquisition, right's new acquisition, but of course Ihave to keep those customers, you know. So we have, like, youknow, member success, like keeping those customers long term. So it'sa combination of both. You know, it's getting new customers, are thenmaking sure new customers stick. Right now we are, we are way aheadof the game in terms of like competitors doing what we do and because webuilt this team and this company predominantly on the outbound side to begin we willbe very hard to catch because, if I know a lot of companies focusin bound first, which is fine, but marketing is relatively easy to ripoff. Like if I can copy your website today, there are APPs forthat. So I can copy your website, I can find out what keywords youuse it. As long as I'm willing to spend more per keyword,I can beat you. I can go hire people to write bad blog contentbut block content to get my e see, like you can rip someone's marketing offrelatively easily. You can't rip off sales to you can't. You can't. The amount of mistakes we've made over the past three years, you're goingto have to make all those same mistakes on the sale side. So marketshare is important but, like right now, it's fine tuning our process and continuingto hire the right people and putting them into that process to continue toscale this company. That's really interesting perspective. I was I was just talking toBrian Burns about kind of one was the future of the sales teams looklike and the power and how you differentiate, how you use your sales team asa differentiator. It sounds like for snack nation that sales team is ahuge business differentiator, at least in staying ahead of anybody that wants to cometo market after you. Yeah, it has to be, and we we'vetalked about this internally. Our product is snacks. Our product is not adifferentiator. I was speaking on this up at the Topo summit in San Francisco. I was presented on like scampling a team and like the bottoms up approachand you know, I set it to the crowds. Like some of youguys have gain changing products, like truly game changing products, you just don'tknow how to sell it. And that's not fair. That's not it's notfair. Like, I'm sorry, I'm selling snacks. And when, whenpeople get into our system and into our process and actually into our sales trainingand see all the different things we have to do in order to be successful, it catches people off of guards because, like you think like snacks, likeOh, it's a simple product, so should be easy to sell,and it's the complete opposite. It's such a simple product that it's actually hardto sell. We got to use every tool and tactic in idea to getto the marks that we're doing, and I don't think enough people put enoughfocus on like that. Actual sales process I think the product can do itfor him. It's not. Your sales...

...team has to be a differentiator.It absolutely has to be. Otherwise you're leaving money on the table. Well, and not only that, but I mean the ability to connect to thepeople that you're selling to write, that human centered approach, not it's notjust about, Hey, I've got this you know, Sass platform that doesXyz, you want to buy it, or I got this new cool gadgetyou want to buy. It's really about being able to ask scale and withconsistency, be authentic and connect with those people on a level that goes beyondfeatures and benefits, right, and that's that's stuff I've seen a lot ofcompanies struggle with being able to scale that. It seems like you guys have kindof cracked that code. I won't ask what the code is, butit sounds like good to crack that code. I will give you the code.I'll give you the code because I'm not I'm not worried about it,because to execute the code is a lot harder. It's it's being bad salespeopleand great communicators. Stop being a salesperson and be a great communicator, bea real person. You call someone and they're just being a Dick, right, like you call them and they're just sorry for my language. I don'tknow. I guess really out about it's using. Are All good, okay, just making sure right. And, like you know, they answer thephone. It's like hey, a Kevin here. A great salesperson will justgo like hey, it's Kevin from stagnation. How's it going? A good communicatorgo WHOA, what? What's going on over there? They taken careof you. They running you into the ground. That question of being agood person, a good communicator, opens up so many doors because you stoppedtrying to sell and you just worked on communicating. When you work on communicating, you understand it's a two sided affair. Sales is one side. So that'swhat we focus on so much. It's how do we how are wegood communicators? How do we find out why people do what they do?Ask that extra question, but level with them as a person. All thesepersonas people. I think of forgotten what a persona is. A persona isa representation of a person and people have feelings and emotions and fears and wants. That's the ticket and that's how we do so much of our selling hereis working with people as people. That makes sense? Yeah, yeah,completely. I could not agree more. It's one of the one of thereasons that I have focused on the things I focus on is because, atthe end of the day, when I used to run sales organizations and hireguys, I always used to joke with with my with people in the hiringprocess, like I need to see your freak flag, like you need tobe able to show me that you've got some rough edges, that you canconnect with people. I don't need another blue shirt, khaki wearing, bingdroub W driving guy. I need somebody that can be real, even especiallywhen we're selling big enterprise deals. You're going you want to be able toget to the point where you can trust somebody. You have to trust thecustomer. Customer has to trust you, and the only way to do thatis to be authentic and human, and a lot of the things that wesee out from a sales standpoint, they I think they rode that. Sometimesjust more focused on the numbers and the top of the revenue, where asif you just focused on being real people, the results speak for themselves. Yep, I agree. So let's change...

...direction a little bit here. Iask all of our guests kind of two standard questions towards the end of eachinterview. The first is simply you are a VP in a growing organization.That makes you, for lack of a better word, of target for peoplethat want to sell. So I mean, we've obviously talked about you know you'vegot you guys cold calling and using outreach with email sequencing and things likethat. But what is it that get your attention right? What is itif somebody want to get in front of you, what is it that wouldbuild their credibility with you? Tell me something about my company. I alreadyknow, meaning you should not target me first period. You need to talkto someone else on my team or at my company before you ever get intouch with me. That is my biggest piece of advice, and this isactually what I had presented on up at the Topo summit, was working moreof a bottoms up approach. If you're trying to get in touch with meand you know nothing about my company, you know nothing about how your productwould actually affect my company. Like when I get these prospecting emails and sayhey, we will x your SDRs production do you understand that my strs createseventy opportunities per month? So you're trying to tell me that you're going todo to hunt. You know what I'm saying? Like you don't. Youdon't know what my team or my company does. That's how you get intouch with higher ranking people, is you learn how your product will actually affectthe bottom of their organization. And if someone shot me an email that saidI talked to your team, you think I'm going to open that email?You, yeah, you weren't know what they said, and I'm going toopen up that email and it's like I'm trying to think of a product shit. Like I'll like an sales off on outreach. Right, I talk toyour team and I found out that there's no structured process for your prospecting.Everyone sending different emails, there's no structure follow up process and I think youmight be losing money because of it. Sales off outreach, we help structurethat process for you so you can actually scale faster, see what's working onit's not, and get the most out of your team. You have tento fifteen minutes and maybe dive in and see if this might be worth lookinginto. That's it, you know, and that that email would actually notonly get my attention but also get a response and almost guarantee a meeting,because you're talking about how your product actually will affect my company. Do nottell me what your products going to do for me when you don't know whatI do. So that's my piece of advice. Excellent, excellent advice.Okay, so last question. We call it our acceleration insight. Doesn't haveto be about sales or how to get a hold of your just in general. When you think about sales, marketing, professional services, people, experts inthe fielder people that are doing this day today. If you have onepiece of advice in addition to make sure you know the company, no,you know who you're talking to, what would it be and why? Andwe wanted to be able to something that you know it's going to help andbeat their targets, beat their numbers. What would be that one nugget thatwe would say? This is, you know, the quote from Kevin.I guess it's in line with what I would just say. If I cangive one piece of advice two companies that are trying to grow and scale,it would be understand how your product actually...

...affects the end user and use thatinformation to win over the decision makers. Excellent. So, yeah, I'mcurious. So how do you? So how does that show up inside ofsnack nation when your guys, when you're scrs, are reaching out, howdo you how do you internalize that? We're talking to the office managers,we're talking to the executive assistance. Like I we can talk to anybody right, like if I'm going after a company, yes, I want to talk tosomeone in finance, I want to talk to the executive assistant, eventuallythe CEO. I can talk to anybody in a company about snacks. Hey, true, you follow right. So, if you have a product that doesemail, get in touch with anyone that sends email at that company.If it's with sales people, sales people are the easiest people to get intouch with. Yeah, you get it, in touch with them, like that'sthat's what I mean by and that's what we do here. To startthe conversation. We talked to whoever we can get in touch with, becausewe can still establish pain points and gaps from that lower level individual. Thenit helps us actually present something to the higher level individual. That actually istrue. Right. So I'm not hitting up someone and going hey, stagnationhelps give you happier, healthier and more productive employees. I can say,Hey, we talk to a couple people who found out you guys really aren'tmixed up the snacks that much and it might be getting a little bit boring. We thought this might be a cool thing to look in you to maybetake that culture to another level. We got five ten minutes. That's howwe internalize it and it works and it works great and there's companies I've talkedabout and consulted to do it and when they start doing it it works andit works great. Use everybody at a company to help you sell. Excellent, excellent. Well, all right, everybody that does it for this episode. Please check us out a Bob Rev exactcom show the episode with friends,families, Co workers. Of course. If you are enjoying what we're puttingout, please write us a review on itunes. Kevin, if people wantto talk to you further about some of the concepts you put out today,what's the best way to get in touch with you? Let's let's start withLinkedin. Hit me up on Linkedin, shooting me over a message, morethan happy to to respond back. All right, excellent. Well then,I can't thank you enough for your time today. This has been great.Thank you so much. Yet excellent again everyone, thank you for this thing. Thanks to Kevin for these invaluable insights and until next time, we havevalue prime solutions. Wi. You and your team's nothing but the greatest success. You've been listening to the BB revenue executive experience. To ensure that younever miss an episode, subscribe to the show and Itunes or your favorite podcastplayer. Thank you so much for listening. Until next time,.

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