The B2B Revenue Executive Experience
The B2B Revenue Executive Experience

Episode · 4 years ago

Kevin Dorsey on 3 Tips for Creating a Sales Culture that Sells

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Businesses are complicated entities with a lot of moving parts, any of which are indispensable to making sure that things run smoothly and that the revenue continues to flow inward.

But, there is one department that is impossible to ignore when trying to sell a product: Sales.

A bit obvious perhaps, but as many can attest, developing an effective sales team can be like fumbling in the dark for a light switch that you’re only 90% sure is actually on the wall nearby. And a lot of that uncertainty is caused by the culture of the company or the sales team.

How exactly do you develop a sales culture that brings in results?

In this episode, Kevin Dorsey, VP of Sales Development and Enablement for SnackNation, offers a wide range of tips for creating a dynamic sales team by explaining how the salespeople at SnackNation have grown and developed a sales culture that sells.

Are you concerned about hitting yourrevenue targets this month quarter or year? Your answer is value, primesolutions, a sales, training and marketing optimization companyleveraging the value, selling framework visit, wwwdot value, Prime Solutionscom,and start accelerating your results. You're listening to the BTB revenueexecutive experience, a podcast dedicated te help with executives traintheir sales and marketing teams to optimize growth, whether you're lookingfor techniques and strategies wore tools and resources, you come to theright place. Let's accelerate your growth in three two one: welcomeeveryone to the btob Revenue Executive Experience: I'm your host ChadSanderson! Today we have with US Kevin Dorsey, vice president of salesdevelopment, N enablement for snack nation. Now for those out there, theyare unaware of what snacgnition is as a person who has been lucky enough towork in an office where we had snack nation, provided it is a rapidlygrowing company focused on delivering healthy snacks that NAB will and createawesome office environments. I can speak to this first hand. Every timethat box would show up. It became a community event which, in and of itselfwould be a reason to have Kevin on the show, but if anybody's you know payingattention to social media linked in things of that nature, he also know th.Kevin is an extremely well respected sales leader and he's done some amazingthings at snacknation. So we wanted to have him on the show, and I want towelcome to Kevin and take you for your time. Absolutely chat happy to be onhere with you appreciate the kind words on snacknation. We definitely do ourbest. The customer service is second to none. In my experience and having alet's say, a wife who was the office Adman Office, exack assistant is verylets. Ay particular hearing e Rave about it and the experiencing it firsthand has just been great for us. So typically at the front of the show welike to do kind of it's an odd question, but we want to get as much value aspossible for our listeners and we ask our guests: If you look back over yourcareer, was there a defining moment or something that happened? Maybe changethe trajectory of your career that you took some lessons away from if you kindof sure what that was, and what those lessons are woe'd love to hear itabsolutely and it I mean that's, actually an easy one for me, so itwould have been jeese. Maybe ten years ago, maybe ten years ago, one of myvery early and now even actually my first mentor David Vabaro handed me abook called Thinkand, Grir Rich, and he said. If you are serious about beingsuccessful, read this book and then we can talk, and so I read read the bookin like two days, and that was the the first time I can say in my life that Ifinally understood that I was actually in control of my own destiny andsuccess. That success didn't happen to me. I made success to happen and thatabsolutely changed my life. I became a...

...voracioust reader and learner afterthat it became a goal setter after that riting my goals, down clear missionstatements, purpose statements and then that has transformed my career and mylife in more ways than I can even count. Actually, the personal ownership ofone's fate is something that, as you get older, it kind of becomes alittle more obvious. But if you get that earlier on in your life, it canmake some serious differences to the DREJECTOR Yor, not only your career,but your personal selfdevelopment. Absolutely so. How about we dumminithekind of the normal stuff and a little background on your role at snaknationsure so I mean asa the end of the day really started with human, soetacnation came from human and human stood for helping unite mankind, nnutrition, and so I oversaw the sales team for a human which was healthy, t,eventy machines, helping markets for schools, corporations offices aroundthe country, and we had this kind of crazy idea about maybe putting somesnacks in a box and seen if people would pay for that. Because if welooked at you know, if you look at trends, we saw eighty. Ninety percentof the inbound leads that came to our website were all smaller offices thatwere too small for Venni machines or too small for markets, but were stillthere was a need there, and so we decided to put snatsh in a Boxtif.People will buy it and not only did it work, it worked really really well, andthen they asked me to try to grow out that team and, as Ay, give me threeraps in three months to see. If we can make it repeatable, it doesn't matterif only I or my cowork at the time jump into. If we're the only ones a can sellit, it doesn't work. So it took three months to kind of put that processtogether and it worked and we have never looked back, and so that's youknow kind of how it came to be well. An the growth has been pretty. I'm prettyamazing. If I remember carte you said you went from thirty to fifty reps andsomething like eighteen months yeah. I mean we're just over fifty now andcoming up on three years. So we have, I mean Zeroo Fiftyan under three and thenyeah we went from wenty to fifty in almost twelve months, so is a very,very fast scale excellent. So when you looked at that team, as you, you know,you had your first three Reps. you prove that it was. I viable that themarket would respond. I'm curious when you start looking at those reps andstarted assessing you know how to scale it and grow. What were the first thingswere the first places you looked in order to make it you know repeatableand scalable opportunity creation. So could we consistently create qualifiedopportunities and then looking at those conversion rates and Faygure ot? Okay,what are the pain points that we are actually solving? What questions do weneed to be asking to expose some of those gaps or painpoints and what Ibelieved to be a consistent and doable conversion rate metric, and we wereable to figure that out over three months in terms of what to expect andthen every decision we've made since then about how to maintain that,because it the as used to be full cycle- and it was you know, eighty percentoutbounde sales. We then introduced...

...sdrs after about a year and a halfbrought revenue up even higher per rep, and now our inbound channel butitstarted to catch up to the outbound. So now we're actually to doing just asmuch inbound revenue as we are outbound, whereas for the first two and a halfyears it was like seventy thirty outbound to Inboun. So it continues toevolve. But we pay attention to the pipeline creation and conversion ratesacross all of our verticals, all of our markets, all of our channels and makeall decisions around trying to cheep those where we want them to be. And so,when you look at creating the structure that you can plug, say you know, SDRsare reps into that's create. You know, that's step one. How do you FA o? Youfigure that out on you structure I, but when you bring reps in, I mean you'vebeen pretty polific on linkedin about you, know, onboarding raps, and howthat works, and I think, is a red, notebook or fivefolded that they carryaround right. So everybody knows at's a overything I's ingenious, then somekind of cars. When, when you bring on those that many new reps, what kind ofthings do you find in the reps from a skillset standpoint that you have tofocus on in terms of skill, SUP development or characteristics? I lookfor in a rap. Oh, let's do unlest do both. Okay, all rightill go I'll, gocharacteristics, first, characteristics, top four look foran all raps grit,selfawareness, adapt ability and curiosity othose are my top for andbecause I believe they have. Those for the skill sets that I want to teachthem. It works because I want to teach them to ask great questions. If you'rea curious person, you naturally ask more and better questions. That's whyit's a quality I look for prospecting is not easy. It is hard, that's whythey need to be gritty, and that's what I mean and notice. I tell us the people.I did not say anything about hard work in the characteristics of the people. Ilook for Aus. I think hardwork is very easy to fake. I don't think most peopleunderstand what t really means. That's why you prit tell Hin. by The Times youworked hard when things were Shitty Bo other times you worked hard when thingsweren't going well. You know I d talk about that great, so that falls intoour prospecting. We're growing so fast that they need to be adactable, notcoachable. There's a big difference between adaptable and Coachbulcoachable requires you to be coached. I have to tell you to change yourbehavior adaptable. Is You recognize, what's happening and change yourapproach because of it? I need adaptable people because we're going tocontinue to change as we grow and that all funnals into selfawareness what'sworking? What's not, where is my performance? What am I good at? What amI bad at so that reps can actually control some of their own destinyieterms of they should be coming to me saying Kevin. I am struggling at thecoaching section of my calls and I would like help getting better at it,and so it all funnels from those characteristics for me, and so when youlook at structuring the team you mentioned, you know going from just thethree reps to strs and it used to be full cycle AE sales. How did you decideon that structure? You know why was it...

...a focus point for you because some ofthe most important metrics I track started to slip so the first year youknow it's a blue ocean for us ight we fin ma. We just go after anybody,everybody we didn't technically even have to be that good. You know we were good, but you didn'thave to be right. You could go after anyone, and so that was fine. Afterabout a year and a half one of the first Metros, I talked aboutopportunity. Creation really started to slide on the a side. It wasn't as easyto prospect anymore, but we couldn't just load up big lists and go and Selin the opportunity creation starts to slive, so that, of course, does revenueand conversionary start to slide, because people started getting looserwith their qualification. You know procest, that's because they justwanted to hit their OPF numbers. So, looking at that, we said all right thinif we can introduce strs in and that it still makes financial set. So even oncewe put Sdrs into the world my as still had to prospect, they just didn't haveto prospect a much, and so then we were able to have in the SDR role, replacethe pipeon that we were losing and then also increased the amount of revenue.We were getting her ae to make sure that that cost made sense. So you saidsomething really interesting that I want. I want to go back to the that,even though there were strs the a still had the prospect I was, I did a Webinaryesterday, O on prospecting actually gave you a shoutout as an example ofphenomenal emails and sent a whole bunch of people. Do Your Linke TinProfile for those emails that you guys publish out there, I'm curious. Do youwork with, as in the SRS on different types of prospective? Where are theyboth using the same approach? I mean: How does that differ? Maybe it's just avolume level, I'm just kind of curious that it's more volume level andtargement suess. The approach and the training in the process are the sane.But my as and now as they've been doing more in Boundiaes are doing less andless prospecting, but like for most of last year, they were targeting largercompanies to prospect, because if you, if you're going to make twentyopportunities for yourself in a month, they'll make them small, so they weregoing after some of the larger mind and larger. Just like not the small CONEC,the strs, you know hit the whole GAM that across the board, okay, excellentand so are they both enabled with the same technology stack, I'm going to becurious to know kind of what that stack looks like and what you found to bemost effective. Yes, they are they both have like know. We have our entireprospecting system in outreach. We USD out reach and Sanisloft, and we haveand have cadences for everything personas what their pain points aremised follow up call I mean we have a sequence for everything, so you'regoing after a larger company that you know have snacks already, there's asequence for that. If you don't know, they have snacks, there's a sequencefor that. If it was an old inbound, lead and we're retargeting, there's asea equence for that, so the whole the...

...whole process is there to be followed.Then it's on the repts determine who they're plugging into those differentprocesses and running with it. So then yeah. How often do you go back and lookat like the effectiveness of particular elements of the cadene? So you know,but maybe it's call scripts movie's the email content. That's going out. Do youhave a process for kind of that constant evolution and agility of thosecadences? Yes, so it used to be monthly and then we would split test. I wouldsplit tested new email for almost every step. Almost every single month can Ibe an open rate by half a percent can by increase response rate by tenpercent and CD. If we can beat it, we even run contest with the Reps. youknow called like beat the main life so f, the rep wants to rewrite an email.It has to be mine if it's like, if it's not going to beet mine, no, you can'thave it in the sequence. It doesn't matter so but like we'll put those things outthere for people, and so yes and then it got to a point where we were seeingalmost no improvements in certain areas, and so it moved to like a by monthlyreview of like okay, if it's maintaining, where it's at right now,that's okay and then looking to like squeeze things out, but a good example.We had. This was two and a half yeah two and a half months ago, like emails,number like five and six in our sequence, had very low response right.So I don't expect high responsories to that point in time, but they were verylow, like in the one and a half to two percent range. I just had to pay a lotof attention to them because you know the earlier emails or where the most ofthe Ashut happene right took a couple days, put out some rewrites and splittests of them and doubled up response rates in a week. You know so taking hemfrom like. You know three to six and two to four. I know exactly what thatmeans now dollars and sents for the company, and we just continue to refineit excellent excellent and is it you know one of the things that I again Isounds like. I probably stolking you on Linke Dan, but your stuff shows up init and it resonates so much. I saw you did a day a call day where the pictureat least was the reps standing up at their desk and when we work withclients, that's one of the first things we try and tell people is like yourphysicality matters right. Your your attitude, smile, stand up, be active,be in your body and be present. I'm kind of curious: Did you just figurethat out or how did you? How did you come across kind of your best practicesfor getting people over their fear of the phone? Well, I guess those are verydifferent questions. I agree with your body. You knowphysicouting matters, but I believe it's comfort matters. There are peoplethat absolutely are looser on the phones when they're sitting and leaningback, and then there are people that sound less Lak adaysical when they'resitting in leaning back. So they need to stand. So it's more so like whatbody position allows you as a person to bring the best side of view out. I'm aspash right. I got TA stand, my my my hands are moving, I'm all over theplace, I'm probably like swinging, something like I'm all over the place.Some of my other rebs, like they are...

...much more comfortable themselves. WhetTheyre in their chair, leaning back hands are still up and moving, butthey're not standing, because when they stand they get tens and they lean overthings. So I'm more so about finding what works best for Yeu, but I dobelieve the physicality is there now on how to get people over their fear ofthe funt one. I mean I address that in thehiring process, like I'm going to do everything I can to figure out like ifyou have that fear already and an a little bitt almost like try to scareyou out of it like you, don't have a choice if you're not going to make yourlike, if you're not going to make your dial care, this just isn't the placefor you period right. You know, so I get ahead of it there. But then Ifirmly believe that fear comes from a lack of knowledge and confidence. Ifyou know what you're supposed to do, there's nothing to be afraid of- and Ithink so many just sales people in general don't really know what they'resupposed to do or the scripts that they're given don't really work likeit's a script, but it it doesn't work, and so now they'reforced to do something that either they know doesn't work, but they don't havea better solution. So now they live in a state of fear all the time of pickingup that phone. So that's why we do so much training and so much likeEducationan and knowledge bace stuff. Here is, if you know what to do, andyou know what objestions you're going to run into and you know how to handlethem, there's nothing to be afraid of, and if you are still afraid of it, thenyou just shouldn't be in saled and that's okay right. You know what I'msaing like it's: Okay, like I'm, not trying to bash people, she's like ifyou still have that fear, and you still have it thit's, just not the right rolefor you and that's all right and I'll. Try to either find something better foryou or you know we help. You know find what a better career path would be. So,I believe fear is Trumpe by confidence and training. I really do a thatit's,an important point. I and it's interesting right. SNECK nations grownso fast and you guys have have very focus on sales enablement on traininggetting those refts to be as effective and as powerful as they can be. It'ssomething that you don't see is in as many organizations as you would expectat least im that honestly tit's. What keeps me employed, but I'm kind ofcurious where that came from for Snag Nation, why the focus from day one wasis part of the culture or was it. You know something that everybody knew wasnecessary. I mean, I think, a lot of that, I'm just I'm trying to man. Howto say is about sounding like really, I guess really egotistical by can atelike it's go was like Educationis, very important to me, just as an individual,and so I believe my own development is so important so that passes down SanKelly, Andy Maginson, Ryan, Schneider, like our C Suet. They are all very,very into selfdevelopment, and it just...

...trickles down you know. So it wasn't it.It wasn't ever really a choice. You know it's just who we were asindividuals and we just took it from there. So you go to you talk to anyleader at this company, any leader at this company. If they are VP level,they are all obsessive on their own personal developments and then it justtrickles down to their teams, because it's not just the sales team. Ourmember success team Chelsea same way, books on our desks, reviewing thingswith their teams weekly trainings, that they do it there, marketing AndyMacinson, taking his team. The conferences like it's just an obsessiveculture we have here and we just were lucky enough to find enough people likeus, to put it all together, excellent excellent, and so, when you look backover your time at snack nation and everything you've accomplished, whatare you the? What are you the proudest of? What do you feel had the mostsignificant impact? I would say, Actuallyi'll tell a story here, one ofthe proudest moments I have to date. It was I think, August or September oflast year, and I mean we like, especially like all of last year. Imean we hit goal, that's what we do and normally we hit goal two to three daysbefore the end of the month. So every extra is just patting. We bring thatGong, that's just how we got down and it was September and it was the lastday of the month and it was like three o'clock and we were still like sixkshort of Bargoal, and you know the team starting to get a little bit nervousaround this and one of our APS. Like Jenny, bring Sin a tk deal, then Jordan pops another twok deal. We got four K in it's likefour forty, five and Chrissy steel brings in like a threethousand dollardeal with fifteen minutes left in the day to take us over goal. Now, the ifyou can see I' getting goosebumps telling this story because of like whathappened when she brought in that deal, she got bobbed like the intire. Theentire aeteam goes in tackles, or people are like yelling and screamingand hugging, and the thing is Chad. No one on that sales team made a dime morefor US hitting goal nothing. There was no incentive there. There was no youget a bonus check like there were people that are already a hundredtwenty percent of goal, calling other people's own lost opportunities. Likethat, that moment will stick with me for so long, because I was proud of theculture we created that that they cared about the team and they cared aboutthat number more than the individual. That that to me will always be one ofmy prowders moments, and I guess it's not even my moment technically right, I just got to. I got to watch it happenand that that to me will always be a highlight of my career here. That's agreat story- and I joked yesterday with somebody that you know friends, don'tlet friends prospect alone right because there's power in doing it in ateam environment and celebrating that...

...stuff with you know each other, thewinds, the losses, the you know we joke with with one client. You know theyhave a board where they write up the best objection. Somebody got for theday. You know, maybe it's where they were told to go and how to get there.But you know whatever it is. You want to celebrate those and come together asa team, that's a very powerful setup. So I'm glad to hear that it's workingwell, for you guys absolutely so when let's talk a little bit about fodecastaccuracy, you gat a lot of movement lot of calls. I'm curious is the tool stackor your process more to credit for forecast accuracy ore. Isthat something that maybe I's not a problem? Maybe we've already figuredout and Dowt that in I just keep hearing that a lot from other clients?Man, if you know someone that has ae forecasting down to a science. You letme know what I guess. What I've gotten down to Ta Science is the discount. Iapply to people's foras they're, saying bad, it's! Actually, it's not a sand bag.It's Happy Years Right Kevin! I got TNK closing tomorrow, okay, so let's talkabout the six houand dollars, that's actually coming IIN. Where is it comingin from right? So we do have technology right like we use sales forest there,certain fields and stages that need to be applied. We use things like insightsquare also, that does some very cool things around forecasting, O the end ofthe day. The number one, the number one thing that we found to determineforecast accuracy is call quality. How well did that actual pitch andrecommendation call go because no technology trumps a bad pitch callperiod, and so that's why we do the call scoring that's why the managers wehave. We really push the a managers to be on the front end of deals not theend of the deals. I know everyone has different sales processces, but for oursale, there's nothing you can do at the ext right. The manager can't step in onthe last closing call to help close that deal. The decisions already beenmade. It's the pitch call, it's a recommendation, call that's where theyneed to get involved, so we actually have reporting. That shows all thelarge opportunities that got created in a day so that the managers can get thereps ready for the kitch call. Once it's in the pipeline chat like it'sdone, it's in the pipeline right, there's, there's very little. That'sactually going to occur. At that point, that's going to make her break thatdeal. It's Alto hat happens on the front it. So that's what affects ourforecasting and so then we have reps, like they have a weekly commit thatthey put it in and then the questions always will lie. Why is this on here?Why do you believe it's going to close, and why do you believe it's going toclose for that amount, and why is this person going to buy and so we've gottenforecasting you know into that way, but then, of course, I still apply a littlebit of a discount because salespeople are optimistsoo like it' cool, but youknow that's, you know, that's where we're at now, and so, when you look atkind of snack nation and your the...

...biggest target for you guys right now,is it more revenue, topline, revnune generation? Is it Market Sharacquisition which the biggest challenge for snacgnition is a whole man? I guessit's obviously its new acquisition rightit's new acquisition, but ofcourse, then we have to keep those customers. You know. So we have likeyou know, memberf success like keeping those customers long term. So it's acombination of both. You know it's getting new customers, withen, makingsure new customers stick right now we are. We are way ahead of the game interms of like competitors doing what we do and because we built this team inthis company, predominantly on the outbound side to begin, we will be veryhard to catch because if I know a lot of companies focus in bouand first,which is fine, but marketing is relatively easy to rip off like if Ican copy your website today, there are apps for that. So ICAN copy yourwebsite. I can find out what keywords you use and as long as I'm willing tospend more per keyword, I can beat you. I can go hire people to wrigt bad blokcontent, but blod content to get my s like you can rip someone's marketingoff relatively easily. You can't rip off sales team. You can't you can't theamount of mistakes we've made over the past three years, you're going to haveto make all those same mistakes on the saleside, so market share is important,but like right now, she's fineteting our process and continuing to hire theright people and putting them into that process to continue to scale thiscompany. That's really interesting perspective I was I was just talking toBrian Burns. About you know kind of ane is the future of the sales teams looklike and the power and how you differentiate, how you use your salesteam as a differentiator. It sounds like for sacnation that sales team is ahuge business differentator, at least in staying ahead of anybody that wantsto come to market after you yeah. It has to be, and we we've talked aboutthis interaly our product is snaxs. Our product is not a different ator. I wasspeaking on this up at the Topo summit in San Francisco. I was presentin onlike scaming, a team n like the bottoms up approach, and you know I've said itto the crowds like some of you guys have gained changing products liketruly game changing products. You just don't know how to sell it and that'snot fair. That's not it's not fair, like I'm, I'm selling snacks, and when, when people get into Oursytemininto our process and actually into our sales training and see all thedifferent things we have to do in order to be successful, it catches people off,f guards because, like you think, like snacks, like oh it's, a simple product,so t should be easy to sell nd, it's the complete opposite. It's such asimple product that is actually hard to sell. We got to use every tool andtactic an idea to get to the marks that we're doing, and I don't think enough.People put enough focus on like that actual sales process. I think theproduct can do it for him. It's not.

Your saleteem has to be a differentshare. It absolutely has to be otherwise you're leaving money on thetable well, and not only that, but I mean the ability to connect to thepeople that you're selling to right that human centered approach, not it'snot just about hey I've got this. You know sast platform that does XY. Do youwant to buy it, or I got this new cool gadget. You want to buy it's reallyabout being able to Adt scale and with consistency, be authentic and connectwith those people on a level that goes beyond features and benefits. Right andthat's, that's! Tough. I've seen a lot of companies struggle with being ableto scale that it seems, like you, guys, h, ve kind of cracked that coat. Iwon't ask what the coat is but sounds like teycan crack that cod. I will giveyou the code. I will give you the Cug, because I'm not I'm not worried aboutit because to execute the code is a lot harder. It's it's being bad salespeopleand great communicators, stop being a salesperson and be a great communicator,be a real person. You call someone and they're just being a Dick Right, likeyou call and they're, just sorry, F R. For my language, I don't know, I guessTrusti Agood, okay, just making sure right and, like you know they answer,the phone is like Hey Kevin. Here, a great salesperson will just go like hey.It's Kavin from stagnation. How's it going a good communicator, go whoa.What what's going on over there? They taking care of you they running newinto the ground. That question of being a good person and good communicatoropens up so many doors because you stopp trying to sell, and you justworked on Communicat n. When you work on communicating you understand it's atwo sided affair. Sales is one sideit. So that's what we focus on. So much ishey. How do we? How are we good communicators, how we find out whypeople do what they do? Ask that extra question but level with them as aperson. All these personas people, I think Hav forgotten. What a persona is.A persona is a representation of a person, and people have feelings andemotions and fears and wants that's the ticket and that's how we do so. Much ofour selling here is working with people as people that makes sense yeah yeahcompletely. I could not agree more. It's one of the one of the reasons thatI have focused on th things I focus on is because, at the end of the day, whenI used to run sales organizations and hiher guys, I always used to joke withwith my with e people in the hiring process like I need to see your freakflag like you need to be able to show me that you've got some rough edgesthat you can connect with people. I don't need another blue shirt, Kaki,Wearan, bmdw driving guy. I need somebody that can be real, evenespecially when we're selling big enterprise deals you're going. You wantto Beabl to get to point where you can trust somebody. You have to trust thecustomer customer has to trust you and the only way to do that is to beauthentic and human, and a lot of the things that we saunt from a salestandpoint. They, I think they rode that sometimes just more focused on thenumbers and the top of the revenue wheres. If you just focus on being realpeople, the result speak for themselvesyep. I agree. So, let'schange direction a little bit here. I...

...ask all of our guess kind of twostandard questions towards the end of Ach interview. The first is simply: Youare a VP in a growing organization that makes you for lack of a better word of target forpeople that want to sell. So I mean we've obviously talked about you know.You've got your guys Cote, calling and using out reach with email, sequencingand things like that. But what is it that get your attention right? What isit if somebody want to get in front of you? What is it that would build theircredibility with you tell me something about my company. I already know, meaning you should not target me. Firstperiod, you need to talk to someone else on my team or at my company beforeyou ever get in touch with me. That is my biggest piece of advice, and this isactually what I had presented on up that the Topo summit was working moreof a bottom's up approach. If you're trying to get in touch with me- and youknow nothing about my company- you know nothing about how your product wouldactually affect. My company like when I get these prospecting emails, a say:Hey, we will threex your SDR's production. Do you understand thatmysdrs create seventy opportunities per month, so you're trying to tell me thatyou're going to do to hunt? You know what I'm saying like you? Don't youdon't know what my team or my company does. That's how you get in touch with higherranking people. Is you learn how your product will actually affect the bottomof their organization? And if someone shot me an email that said, I talked toyour team. You thin I'm gong to open that email. You Yeah, you want knowwhat they said and I'm going to open up that email and it's like I'm trying tothink a product shit like I'll, like sales ofper an outreach right. I talkto your team and I found out that there's no structured process for yourpropespecting everyone', sending different emails, there's no structureto follow up process and I think you might be losing money because of itsales off outrage. We help structure that process for you, so you canactually scale faster, see. What's working whit's not and get the most outof your team, you have ten o fifteen minutes to maybe dive in and see ifthis might be worth looking into. That's it you know and that that emailwould actually not only get my attention but also get a response, analmost guarantee, a meeting, because you're talking about how your productactually will affect my company. Do not tell me what your products going to dofor me when you don't know what I do Ikso. That's my piece of advice,excellent, excellent advice. Okay, so last question: We call it ouracceleration. Insight doesn't have to be about sales or how to get a hold ofyou just in general, when you think about sales, marketing, professionalservices, people, experts in the field or people that are doing this day today.F youhave, one piece of advice. In addition to make sure you know thecompany know you know who you're talking to what would it be and why a Dwe wanted to be able to something that you know i's going to help am beattheir targets, beat their numbers. What would be that one nugget that we wouldsay this is you know the quote from Kevin? I guess is in line with Whi would justsay. If I could give one piece of advice to companies that are trying togrow and scale, it would be understand...

...how your product actually affects theend user and use that information to win over the decision makers. Excellent,so yeah, I'm curious. So how do you so? How does that show up inside of snacknation when your guys, when your strs are reaching out? How? How do youinternalize that we're talking to the office managers or Talkinto? Theexecutive assistance like we can talk to anybody right like if I'm goingafter a company. Yes, I want to talk to Yousomeon Wen in financeer. I want totalk to the executive sister, eventually the FEO. I can talk toanybody in a company about snacks, Hey true, you follow I right. So if youhave a product that does email get in touch with anyone that sends email atthat company, if it wath sales people, sales people are the easiest, people haget in touch with yeah, you get it in touch with them. Likethat's, that's what I mean by them. That's what we do here to start theconversation we talk to, whoever we can get in touch with, because we can stillestablish painpoints and gaps from that lower level. Individual, then thathelps us actually present something to tha higher level individual. Thatactually is true right. So I'm not hitting up someone and going heystagnation helps give you happier healthier and more productive employees.I can say: Hey we talk to a couple people we found out. You guys reallyaren't mixing up the snacks that much and it might be getting a little bitboring. Hi thought this might be a cool thing to look into to maybe take thatculture to another level. We got five ten minutes, that's how we internalizeit and it works, and it works great and there's companies. I've talked aboutand consulted to do it and when they start doing it, it works. It worksgreat use everybody at a company to help. You sell excellent, excellent.Well, all right everybody that doesn't for this episode. PLEASE CHECK US OUTOT B TB, revezeccom sor the episode with friends, Families Coworkers, ofcourse, if you are enjoying what we're put now, please retist review on itunesKevin. If people want to talk to you further about some of the concepts youput out today, what's the best way to get in touch with you but', let's startwith linkedin hit me up on link. Didn Shoot Me Over a message Im more thanhappy to to respond back all right. Excellent. What again, I can't thankyou enough for your time tha. This has been great. Thank you. So my shetexcellent again everyone thank you for listening, thanks to Kevin for theseinvaluable insights and until next time we value prime solution wish you inyour teams, nothing, but the greatest success. You've been listening to the BTOBrevenue executive experience to ensure that you never miss an episodesubscribe to the show in Itunes for your favorite podcast player. Thank youso much for listening until next time.

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