The B2B Revenue Executive Experience
The B2B Revenue Executive Experience

Episode · 4 years ago

Juliana Slye on The Challenges of Marketing and Selling to the Public Sector

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In Juliana Slye’s long career throughout the private and public sectors, two things have stuck with her more than anything:

  1. “It’s not about me, or where I believe the market is headed. It’s really all about the customer.” At the end of the day, if the customer doesn’t want it, it’s not going to happen.
  2. “You can’t go against your DNA.” Whether personal or professional, you have to take that DNA and make that work for you.

Today, she is the CEO and Chief Strategist at Government Business Results, and she says that “there is no other industry that is more challenging, more compelling, and more risk/reward laden than working within the public sector.”

Listen in to hear her stories of how a normal gift in the private sector can cause a panic when sent to the public sector, as well as why she’s so passionate about the work she does.

Find a breakdown of this episode here.

Are you concerned about hitting yourrevenue targets this month quarter or year? Your answer is value, primesolutions, a sales, training and marketing optimization companyleveraging the value, selling framework visit, www, dot value, primeSOLUTIONSCOM and start accelerating your results. You're listening to the BTB revenueexecutive experience, a podcast, dedicated helpin executives, traintheir sales and marketing teams to optimize growth. Whether you're lookingfor techniques and strategies were tools and resources. You come to theright place. Let's accelerate your growth in three to one: welcomeeveryone to the Beto, be revenue executive experience. I'm your hostChad Sanderson! For those, as that don't have time to listen to the entireepisode. Please feel free to check US OUT IT BE TO B Red Ezeccom or, ofcourse it is up on Itunes, where review is always greatly appreciated. Today weare locking a EP with us: Julianaslide she's, CEO and chief strategists withthe company called government business results that focuses on go to marketstrategy and enablement for technology firms focused on selling to the publicsector. Its coan be a great conversation, consirdei a lot of EURguess. This point, of course, hat en focus on private, so we're lookingforward to our perspectives on this. She is a long history of selling intothe public sector, with executive positions at Autodesq, a dob and Sgi,so Guliatna were extremely excited to have you on the show. Ther reallyappreciate the time, thanks Jad, it's really great to be here. You know. Formy perspective, I think your podcast deliver a really unique perspectivethat adds a lot of value for the marketing and filling community, and soI'm just threlled to be able to participate excellent. Well, I'm goingto use this with a lot of our prospects that are focus on public sectors. Sofor me it is also extremely vial. So again I will ou Houn and thank you foryou time. Normally on these podcast, we like to frontload the value. Well dosome of the normal types of questioning stuff, but one of the things I like toask are guests, especially consideer. Typically, high level executives, youknow experienced professionals is, was there a defining moment in your careerwhen you look back that kind of either change the course of your career orprovided you with some inspiration? If you can kind of share that with ourguests and explain what that was, I would love to start there. What a great question you know,interestingly enough, when we see when we think about a defining moment, it'sthat Aha right, where kind of, like the clouds part and the sunshines down e SN,is this this benign moment. You know that adds a lot to your life. Mydefining moment is one of failure. I think you know we can soften it alittle bit by calling it I failed forward the reality is it wasn't just a littlefailure? It was a pretty monster failure I was in my late is, and at thetime I was responsible for driving military simulation and training growthfor a little tiny company called silicon graphics, who, if you know whosylicographics or Sgi, are in their hayday, they transform gaming virtualreality, Hollywood special effects and military training and simulation. Theyhad these these graphic super computers and that were just programmed to screamcutting edge, graphics, technology and capabilities. So if remember GurassicPark, that was all done on the SGIS ighand. So my job was to take theirhardware and some of their software and position it towards the military,training and simulation industry and drive revenue and growth there and I'mlooking out acrossut everything and it's you know it's the late S, early,twosand and pcs were coming on, as was the Comoditization of the graphics card,and I decided you know what absolutely that's the direction we should be goingin. I know we make multimillion dollar machines here at Sgi, but we reallyneed to make a low cost entry. A product called a PC, graphics, clusterand Sgi is going to be the one to pioneer it because who knows more aboutgraphics and Silca Graphics, right right. So so I was. I was head stronginto this and I knew exactly what I was doing except I didn't so.

I had no idea how to make a low andcommodity piece of hardware. Everything they had done had been high touch.Almost a manual assembly of these super computers- and here I was trying to getthem to build a low cost, PC, graphics, cluster and, at the end of the day, notonly was Sgi not prepared to produce these things, but the military,training and simulation in industry wasn't prepared to buy them. Theylooked at Sgi as a very high end provider of hardware and they keptlooking at it. This this PC, graphics, claster, going hang on a minute.Everything about this is a compromise and my responsible. What about it is tocompromise it's medium, great graphic technology available for the lowlowprice of twenty six thousand dollar Ao pay. By the time it was all sadd anddone that was the cheapest. I could get SGI to manufacture this product andthat was cost likwhate Expedin D, but the company had. Let me proceed downthis path, and I think you know it was. I had so much energy and so much visionaround it that they got behind my passion of my energy and allowed me todrive this forward and at the end of the day you know my perspective at thetime was: Oh, it's the next big wave. I know we were totally dead on for whatwe were going to do, but I was asking Mercedes Bens to build a UGO and theCustomar didn't want to buy a Ugo from Mercedes Bens. What the customerswanted was the quality that they and cutting EDG capability that they hadexpected from silicographics, and so I think we sold one eentire wine was shutdown six months later and it was a failure and it was. It wasn't just alittle tiny failure right because when you spit up a big product inside of acompany, it all hangs on your back, but at the end of the day you know I feel,like I feeled my customers, I've filled my company, I filld my division. Ifailed everybody Andi thoght for sure this is it. This is the end of mycareer going to go down in flames over twenty six ousand dolar PC, graphics,cluster wone, as was the I mean for a while ther Si was the IT company. Iremember I'm very clearly remember what sti was bringing the market and theywere known for the that big. You know the big solution it was. They were nota a lowend player at all, so even to have SGI be willing to invest in you, Imean that's a huge vote of confidence winner fail. You know it's those n Oconfienc. Well, it was a tommendous bout of confidence but but check it out.I was going after a segment of the market that silicon graphics didn't own,that I thought would be highly valuable to own and I was ignoring a bunch ofvery important things along the way I was ignoring me SGI brand. I wasignoring what the company itself was good at. I was ignoring what mycustomers really wanted, and I was convinced that I had the answer and somy big Aham, what really shaped my life moving forward in my professionalgrowth, were actually two things one. It's not about me, it'sit's, not aboutwhat I know or what I think or where I believe the market is headed. It'sreally all about the customer, because at the end of the day, if the customerdoesn't want it- and it's not positioned in a way to drive value forwhat the customer, where the customer wants to go, it's not going to happenright. So that was that was my ha number one. My Second Onha was youcan't go against your DNA. You have to take that DNA, whatever form it's inwhether it's personal DNA or professional DNA and make it work foryou. You know your listeners aren't going to necessarily know this, but I'msix foot, four, and so as a tall woman, especially growing up, you have tofigure out pretty quickly how to make your DNA work for you, because eitheryou own a hight or it owns you. But you extend this into kind of what Ilearned was tolicon, graphics and it really comes down to. They were a highend, graphics, manufacture that was their pedigree. That's their DNA,that's what they knew, how to do and that's what they were known for, so itwas about taking that and making it...

...work for us not filling some gap that Iperceive because they weren't a Lowen player and again those two pieces ofknowledge have kind of stuck with me all the way through to what I do todayand the work that we do today is helping companies translate their valueproposition on the commercial side and extended into government and publicsector and along the way, I'm very careful to remember that I can'ttransform this company as DNA. I can extend it. I can match the value forthe DNA. I guess what the customer needs within the public sector are, butI can't change it and I can't alter it. So I keep that pretty sacresink andthen the other piecees is. I really strive to come at it from the customersperspective and the public sector is is rather brutal and unforgiving. If youdon't so those two lessons sort of guide metoday well and so thit's great, actually segwe. So SGI was publicsector stuff. How did you get into public sector? WAS IT by design? Didyou always know growing up? You wanted to go into public sector or how didthat come about now, I'm from a military family. My family is full ofmilitary and nurses, so we were born to serve in one capacity or another, Omilitary nurses and fers actually sore born to serve in one aspect or another,but I think, like everything in life, all of the great journeys begin with asingle stufp that just sort of feels good and for me I answered an ad in alocal DC metro paper for a technology reseller that was looking for somemarketing help and once I got into it and realize where they were focusedwithin government, I was hooked. I was completely hooked. I mean from myperspective there is no other industry that is more challenging. Morecompelling and more risk record Latin Aonin, the ECTR, and so once for me, Igot a taste of really being able to drive and manipulate business andgrowth in the public sector. I was hooked and that' sort of all. She wrotein that area, and so, when we talk about you mentioned before, youunderstand it from the customers perspective of that type of stuff. Wetalk about that a lot with a lot of our clients. I'm curious, have you seenther B I mean it's a pretty simple concept right, but also very difficultat time for some people to grass and put into practice. So I'm curious froma public sector standpoint how you go about working with companies to say hey.You really need to see this from the from the angle of the DOD or you know,entities of that size, or is it really about that particular buyer orindividual that you're trying to cover the value from you know it'sinteresting. I have found that accompanyes ability to really quoteunquote, get it in terms of what the public sector is about and drivingrevenue there directly relates to how deeply they've invested and committedto verticalization in general and and to their ability to be customer centric,because I think if you, if you look at the scale of being customer centric, onthe one hand, you know you've got truly company centric ideoology on the righthand, side of the spectrum. On the left hand, side is truly customer centricand that's where public sector is out of all of the verticals. It is the mostextreme in demanding a customer, centric cability, so for companies whoare really far to the right and they're still sort of selfabsorbed what it'scall it, what I say to them in the way that I explain it is the public sectorin and of itself isn't just about using a certain type of terminology orlanguage. It's not about translation. I can translate something from English into Spanish, but public sector is about localization, where you have to payattention to culture and business practices, and so I will typically walkcompanies through that discussion of what it means to pay attention to thepublic, stuftr culture, the public sector, business practices and, ofcourse, the public sector language, because it all raps together andusually they'll understand a lot of times I'll kind of nod their heads andgo. I Har the words that are coming out of your mouth. I really don't know how to interpretthat to what we do and then, then we go...

...down the path of showing them how howto actually execute that within their organization structure, and so is thatkind of you know. The Genesis for government business results was that Imean, after years of selling, to the public sector of marketing the publicsector of Tha. The genesis for opening your doors as an entity focused on thatkind of thing. Where did that come from you know it's interesting. I so gone tomy life. I've managed Global Government Industries for folks, like Yo macomedia DOB audids, the companies that you identified earlier and it was intwo thousand and ten, and I decided to take a step out of working for amainstream company and spend a little time focusing at the time with my newemerging family, and then I laso came out picking up a new position in thefall. As I went through the summer, you know and started to look at my bankaccount decided I gottaget serious about this whole new position thing. Istarted to talk to a colleague of mine who said You know what jewels at theend of the day. If you want to go dock in somewhere I'll help you dock in, andthis person had known me for about fifteen years, he said, but I know whatyou're good at and I know companies need what you do and it's beensomething ihad heard over the course of my career. Oh, we wish we'd hadsomebody like you or wow. You know your team really produces results. We wishwe had that and the whole time in the back of my head, I'm thinking a what anice compliment and nothing more than that, but when I hung out my shingleand in the fall of thosand a ten, I thought you know I'll pick up a coupleof gigs it'll be kind of a nice business. We became overwhelmed andsaturated almost out of the gate, and what I realized was this idea of reallydriving a specific industry with imbedded institutional knowledge of howto run that industry is lacking in the technology sector. Youwill find folkswho make great industry marketing managers because they know how to spina word but moving beyond that and developing the structures, the programsand the content that actually accelerate revenue. That's almostbecome a dying art, and so what we have found over the course of standing upGbr is there are actually a lot of companies out there who really needwhat we refer to is industry support as a service in the way where we can kindof dock into their existing infrastructure and provide a level ofservices that are almost white labeled. So the companies that you see and talkwith today in the public sector there's a good chance at somewhere along theirpipeline theyre, either their strategy, their messaging or their content, wasapproached or massage in some way by either GBR or somebody who's related toGbr in some way interesting. So you know, when you talk about technologycompanies, everybody knows the big brands right, so do be. Google, thosetypes of things but- and you know that they have great expertise and put a lotof money behind going, be to see going to consumers that that get that I'mkind of curious. If you had, if you could identify like three, the topthree things that a marketer who's really accomplished in anonverticalized text base would need to be aware of in order to kind of makethat transition to being effective at public sector marketing. What would hethose top three things, be you know I'll say both from the marketing andthe sales component? It's a couple of things. The first is, you have got tolisten and it's about listening to really understand the culture that Italked about earlier, as well as the dynamics that are in play, not justinside of the general public sector, but inside each of the segments, DodState, local, icy healthcare and education. Every single one of thosecomponents has a very different rhythm and heartbeat for how they drivebusiness and different sets of needs, and in that way it's no different thanreally listening to a customers needs in general right. You can genericize toa point, but you become far more effective if you're able to trulylisten and zero in. So that's the first thing. I think the second thing is thatyou've got to put yourself in their shoes. You have to be able tounderstand their immediate payinpoints and it's not always obvious, and it'snot always what the market's going to...

...tell you it's going to be, as Imentioned, that each one of the different segments have their differentissues and challenges. I find that each one of the customers that we talk tohave their different painpoints within that as well, and then the thirdpoponent I would say realistically, is that you can't think of the publicsector as a vertical. You need to think of it as a horizontal and what I meanby that is for every single quote, unquote vertical, that you can find ina commercial space, you'll find it in public sector, so you'll find healthcare in public sector you'll, find manufacturing in public sector you'll,find utilities in public sector you'll, find transportation and public sector,and so to really kind of think about the public sector as another horizontalmarket or a vertical of verticals. If you will so interesting so it becomes,I mean I've done some just a very little bit of selling into the publicsector. Rigt and there's all of the Ho io say this. Nice of the stereotype forsomehing to the public sector right takes forever a lot of bureaucratic redtape. I'm curious when you look at it as its own entity. Do you run intochallenges with those tech companies who may be used to other vercals werethat were the normal horizontal and then going after the public sector? Dothey have their own internal cultural challenges? Because that's a I meanit's a pretty big shift that you're talking about SOM curious, how theirown internal cultures impact their ability to be successful. You know itimpacts them in a variety of different ways. Again, it comes down to howdedicated the company is to truly focusing on their customer and and thatdescribes whether or not they're going to have an easier time adapting tomarketing and selling into the public sector or not. When I'm helping acompany to establish the preficiency, though, and really kind of begin tomake the changes. The challenges that we see are more often around the Ohgosh. How do I say this? It's a struggle for companies to want toprovide one vertical, something that they're not providing the otherverticls. In other words, you know companies will often see theirverticals as their children and they all need to get easyly fors singn. Theyall need to get equal support, with the exception of the fact that the publicsector is different and that's a very challenging obstacle for many companiesto overcome. There is a sales specialty. There is beyond sales and marketing.There's an operational need. There's a contract, nate, there's a legal lead.It truly is its own little ecosystem that gets spun up and you have toprovide you know. Not only do yo have o ride differentiated resources, butthere is a significant upfront investment that in some cases may takeyears to recoop in terms of an Roy and both of those things, both the upfrontinvestment and the disproportionate nature of the investment compared tothe other verticals, as well as the Roi time frame, tend to be verychallenging for tech companies who usually want it all. They want it nowand they want it in Thrntd, Xuntry, nd. Ninety dance right well and that's theway I mean that's the way they kind of go to market. It's the way wall streets,you know kind of trained them. My experience with government sector wasthose wore extremely you know lucrative. If you could win, but it was a hugeamount, I mean I man, I ended up going door e door helping a lobbyist one time,so I mean it takes a very long time and that type of investment is almost it is.I don't know if it's the other side of the coin whor does it create frictionwith, like the other sales teams and marketing teams that are moving at afaster pace, Os that timeline itself create challenges? Oh absolutely, youknow it's funny. I've one CIENT who talks quite a bit about one wanning,create something called linearity in the sales program, and so what they'relooking for across the board from their commercial sector, is that you wind upwith it's the flattening of the hockey stick right, so you spread out revenueso that in month one of the quarter you're achieving you, thirty to fortypercent of YOAR REVENUE MON to thirty to forty percent month three. You knowtwenty five to thirty percent Oror,...

...some level of flattening and all thatthere's a lot that public sector reps can do to manage and drive theirrevenue in a cadence that aligns well with the company they're working with.But you can't change the laws of the federal fiscal year. You just can'tthere's there's nothing that a rep can do to change the fact that thegovernment is going to spend a lot of money between August verson Septemberthirtiet. So you can fatten it as much as you want, but you're still going toget that massive hockey stick on September thirtiet and the big tailthat comes in the November December January time Brang. So it ischallenging for these technology companies and the traditionally privatesector companies to understand that there are some things that are out oftheir control and then you know, then you have things like continuingresolution where all bets are off because they just stopped spending. It's really hard to be that salesdrapHo goes. I have a one point: two million dollar deal in the pipeline andthe federal government just shut down, but that so we go back to what I talkedabout earlier. I thrive for that kind of challenge. The creativity that isborn of repeatedly driving revenue in that kind of a space is really. Youknow to me: It's intriguing and it's compelling, but for technologycompanies, what they see often at the managerial level, is okay. I've got ateam telling me that this is different. They need more. It's going to be longertill I get the RLI and I look at all of that and go I don't know if we want tobe a part of this business or I don't know if we can sustain a commitment atthe level you're asking us to sustain a commitment without the Roy, and youknow everything else that you're going against the grain with, and so thoseare some of the challenges that I typically have to deal with as well. Sodo you? Do you find yourself? You know youv been doing this a while you're,obviously an expert ot it and you're got your own concern. Going your ownbusiness gburs up and run O be very successful. Do you find yourself in theinviable situation of being able to look at customers and assess kind oftheir level of commitment and say in yea your nay? No, we don't want to dobusiness with these guys because they're not there like. What's yourkind of your own education portion of your own sales cycle, when you look atcustomers who come to you and look for help, whether those that fit the billin those that you know just aren't ready yeah and it's very interesting.You know I started my Oll step back a little bit by saying I started mybusiness simply because I really enjoy what I do and I think you' here it myvoices, I go pleasure and what I do, and so this whole idea of managing myown sale cycle from time to time catches me a little bit going. OP Ehang on. I actually I got to take a look of my pipeline and manage my SalleSi yo know Itt cobblers, kids right have no shoes, so I look at it and gookay. Yeah, you know. Are we in a position to turn away business? We are,but we don't- and I look at it from the sandpoint that when folks come to usit's because they have a need- and you know there're two things that fuel me.It's helping someone in meed and I think that's part of my family'scommitment to service. You know you find service in a variety of differentways, but the other piece is I'm truly intrigued, because every problem isslightly different. You can have certain categories of problems and Ican look at a customer and go or a client and go. You know what we'regoing to go through this. It's going to cost them a bunch of money and a bunchof time and at the end of the day, they're going to struggle with reallyhow they implement it, and I can have that sense going into the conversation.But what I find is that little bit of spidy sense makes me work that muchharder to help whatever it is that I create or consult with them on work forthem, so that they can perpetuate it so that they can implement it and that'sthe way. I typically look at those scenarios e, it's always fun to findthe next. I think my wife refers to. It is my puzzle problem like I need theknow. The NEX puzzle right, that's the beautiful thing about professionalservices. Every client has a different perspective or a different Yah ordifferent cultural challenge. So I can...

...completely understand where you'recoming from. I do have some customers I'll, be honest. Where I've looked backand said yeah, maybe I should have not gon o that past, but I thinkeverybody lives in lers that as they go through en nous customers that customersegment learned from you during that engagement and you learned from themGos on and I think, walk away. Both parties walk away richer for it. Thisis true. This is true bregod. My wife would say that you, you see the glasshalf full and I'm annoyed at the glasses on the table. Obut. I totally understand where you'recoming from la I'm surious and we've talked about this a little bit in thepast, the difference between sales professionals in the private sectonversus public sector. When you encounter companies that are, you know,they have a well developed. Perhaps a you know, it's a proven private sectorsales team and when they start to go build that public sector team. You knowwhat are the differences that they need to be aware of what types of of peopleand personality should they be looking for, yeah now great question, so Itypically start off by saying all right if you're going to go, hire somebodywho is and we're talking about a company hiring somebody in a privatesector to work in the public sector, sure, okay, so let's start there, socompanies will often say well. I can just take one of my top sellingcommercial reps and turn them into a good public sector. AP and I go if youhave five years for them to get there absolutely absolutely, and I typicallyget this crosseyed look and I'm light and my respons pecifically along thelines in order to become highly skilled public sector Rep. you need tounderstand the budget cycles and to have lived through at least three ofthem or four of them at which point you're looking at three to four years,because there is a continuity, that's involved, there's understanding thesystem and the structure and how the money flows. And then you have to learnhow to manipulate and drive that spend in a sales capacity. And I know itsounds you know challenging if I say the words manipulating government sense,IIS, it's a sales process is we go foit andthere is a certain level of management of expectations that you have to gothrough both on the customer side and within your own. Your own company side.So I'll start there. But then the second thing that I I typically look at-and this is if, if you're going to bring to me a public sector, rep andsay, is this candidate good? For My company, I'm going to advise them tolook for a couple of things. The first thing is they ask me: Well, they'veonly worked for this company for a year and that company for two years, and isthat a problem and increasingly with the millennial workforce, you see thattype of job hop, and so I don't get as concerned about that. As I previouslydid. I will tell you where I focus with public sector instead, and that istheir time in segment. How long have they been driving business inside offederal civilian agencies or how long have they been driving business withinthe DOD? If you see them hopping back and forth between fedsive and dod alittle bit of commercial over here back indefensive, I start to see red flagsbecause within the public sector it is such a relationship driven segment thatwhat you want in an ideal sales hire as someone who can bring to the tablesolid, sail skills and a deep understanding of the customer, as wellas relationships within agencies and knowledge of how agencies acquire andyou get that by sales draps who has spent time in segment, and so that'swhat I would encourage hiring managers to look for so time in the barrel righttime in the barrel becomes the big thing. Now we see that type that sametype of need for that cross, section of skillsets right, understand thecustomer and the industries. You see that on both sides of the fence attimes have that ability to to kind of multi level layer that approach. I'mcurious for public sector you're talking about, and we talked about timehorizon right. There's there's this MI longer play here. Do you find it's ait's easier to find people that have had time in the borou but may notnecessarily be the most polished sales professionals and have the most Polishtale skill set? Where do you find sales...

...people that may not necessarily havespent enough time insegment? As you say, you know, I find that they can spend agood amount of time in the sales barrel, but I really want to see them time andsegments time and segment is what I found to be the the most significantqualifier of or predictor rather of their success. Okay, okay, and is thatlargely because it's such I mean relationship plays apart in every typeof sale, but in public sector it seems to play an even more important rolebecause of the volatility and a whole bunch of other reasons. But but is itbecause of that rotability to understand how it works in an insidethat context to build those relationships? It really is and I'llflip it another way. So when you're, making a commercial sale as a sales rap,you can send an executive gift. You can send you know a door opener y. You cansend an email directly to their mobile phone. You know you could invite themto a very ou specialized luncheon at the Ritz Carlton, where only five otherexecutives are going to be, and all of that is not permissible inside of thepublic sector for one reason or another. You know, for example, public sectoremployees are bound by anti. Oh, it's antibribery laws that the maximum giftsthey can receive in a given ear cannot exceed more than twenty five dollars,so you can't buy him. Lunch can't buy him. Dinner can't buy im drinks right,so you have to find a different way to build a relationship right. Typicallywithin most public sector agencies, they have firewalls that don't allowhtml based emails to go through okay. So I'm not sending this really coolspiffy email that has all the bells and whistle I've got ta, go straight backto pex, right, okay, all right and guess what I'm not going to be able tosend an email to your mobile phone, because it's FIP certified and thereare certain things that won't be able to go through, because in my email,signature I might have and a url to my company and your span filters inside ofthe Government Agency- might grab that and kick it out so they're. All theseintricacies and characteristics of engagement inside of the public sectorthat are either bound by law or bound by a need for security or in need forprivacy and the primary way to break through. All of that is face to facewhen you can have a face to face engagement and build a relationshipwith the customer, then that relationship has a significant value inthe public secter and I won't say it's more so than in the commercial sector.But it's really important because the ways reaching government agencies todayin the individuals and side of government agencies is just gettingmore and more difficult when you're trying to do it from the outsideunderstandand. So then, of course, the time in the barrel becomes a time andsegment becomes that that critical component I mean you can teach hem whatwe do: teach companies how to Prospectie the private sector using allof the different mediums that are out there, but I mean you know youbasically just shut down five of the seven ways that we ry to Getol. I could tell you the story about aclient who thought it was a really good idea to send solar powered batterychargers. You know freak for your little cell phone right, right,Fifteenar, Deviceis, twentydolar devices, but think about the circuitryboards behind them, a thousand of them to you, know SocialSecurity Administration and the Rucus in the mailroom when theyreceived that level of security components, because everything getsanything anytime. You Mail, something to a government agency. First andforemost, it goes to their security scaner, so think about the badlash around that.It's just it's understanding these cultural norms and these limitationsand then figuring out creatively how to work within them to build the kind ofrelationship that you need, and, frankly, your customer needs. Excellent.Okay, yeah totally makes sense something like sense. So when you lookat you know, we've talked about it a...

...lot, but what is, if you can boil itdown? What is it about public sector that inspires or motivates you the mostman, obviously very passionate about it very accomplished turs? What is it thatgets the atrental and Flowin about the public sector? For it? You know it'sgoing to sound, really Corni, but it comes down to knowing the work that I'mdoing plays apart in changing people's lives and making a difference. The repsthat I deal with and the marketing teams that I work with are reallytouched. They've got their fingers into third rail elements of our nationalsecurity of military training, of Social Security and health and welfaresystems, and when my clients are able to help agencies, implement a healthcare system or or a welfare system, that all of a sudden enables a wholecommunity of less fortunate individuals to be able to tap into their benefitsvia mobile devices. Instead of having to go to a brick and mortar, it changestheir life when we're able to, when my clients are able to more effectivelysell technology to the military that actually makes a substantial differencein delivering a information, superiority or decision, making asuperiority to the battlefield. It means more soldiers come home safely,and that's that's huge for me when we're, when I'm able to help companyunderstand how their technology can fits within the intelligence communityand can deliver an advantage to our intelligence community in the way thatthey protect our nation. Then I know at the end of the day the work that I'mdoing ultimately down the chain has a real impact, and I think about all ofthat and for me and that's a big piece that fuels me and doing what I do and Ialso know that's what really drives many of my clients as well. It's thisidea that you're rolling up your sleeves you're, putting your hands deepdown into the machine and you're trying to make a difference, and it's prettycool for us. That intrinsic motivation is something that some of the mostsuccessful people I've ever had the opportunity o Medi andoor interviewshare right. There is there. Is that intrinsic it's not just about theDOLLART's, not just about the puzzle. There's a there's, a dee VI, TRINSICMORAR! So I'm very excited to hear that when we talk when we look back, we'vetalked about a lot of different different things, but I'm I'm curiousif there's an upcoming trend or something that you're seeing new in thepublic sector, that you're excited to see playout or something that you'recurious, how it wil will impact the segment so to speak. You know, so,let's take a look at the administration bthere's, the really exciting part. SoI watched as I think as we all have. This administration go down and varyingpaths N, and I do actually believe theyre in a learning pattern right now, where it wines up, but I think it's alearning patternt. But what I'm seeing right now is that, honestly, the rulesare changing and I think that that gets me really excited about technologyacquisition because it means anytime you've got this level of change in theatmosphere that it brings about new capabilities. I think one of the thingsthat government agencies and public sector agencies truly struggle with attheir core today is acquiring technology in time and in a way thatthey can point to immediate use. I mean everybody laughs about the government.Being this big bohemof bureaucracy, it's the elephant lumbering around inthe room. It's what have you, but everybody. I know who works forgovernment really does want to see change made. There is you know theirhands are as Tighet as the technology folks who are trying to to upgrade them.So and I'll cite you an example. It's really interesting. There is within adod. There is a specific piece of technology that we'v used that has beenacquired to manage their healthcare records and over time we've seen theplight of the the via and all of the challenges that Theba has had right.Well, interestingly enough, the VA, the head of the VA did something I've neverseen done before, and that was...

...basicacly make the decision withoutgoing out to bid hey. We are going to adopt what the DOD has adopted forMedical H, health care records and that will enable us to do two things: onecommunicate electronically with the DOD, which, frankly, they couldn't beforeand that's a little frightening. The second piece is, though, it's they'relooking across the aisle identifying something. That's worked and said youknow what we are just going to move forward and execute we're not going totry to reinvent the wheel. I get super excited about that because that's agame changer not just for government agencies but for sales teams as well,because it tells the sales rap. If you can build the case, if you can go highenough, then you can help to effect change faster, well, N, that specificconnet PACIIC, va example. I mean I actually watched President frump'sspeech when they were talking about. Having been able to accomplish that-and I remember I was actually shocked to think that the part of the challengehad been that lack of ability to share Emr. You know electronometical rekordsbetween the different. You would just think. I made the assumption that thatwas already in place and had no idea how absolutely complex that thatproblem had been, but to see them solve that. We can completely understand thereward that that brings the table, but also the excitement, because now you'vegot the ability, I would think to do a larger scale, sales strategy. Thatcould mean even more Roi may not change the tilen necessarily but ma, but mightget oraay out of it right, so so that that is taking the handcuffs off alittle bit of the sales teams and encouraging them to go high right andbuild a lot of value around what they're doing. But the second thing itdoes that I get really stoked about to is you're able to then reference cellin new and meaningful ways. It's the first time. I've actually seen at thathigh level and enterprise reference sale go from one installation not justto another installation, but if you think about it, the Department of viais a civilian agency very federal civilian agency. The DOD is the DOD andthey typically purchase very differently, and in this case, you'vegot a civilian organization who referenced off of a Dod Sale and issimply going to copy and print for them that tell sales, reps references domatter, and your ability to reference across account is going to continue toimprove your sales posture. So it's a much more dynamic environment right it',especially with all the change and the change of e administration. It getsmore dynamic. Do you see the sales reps get excited about that or they or theylitt kind of can't believe it's happening? Well, you know it's like every changeinside of a salesy cause at the same time, you're getting excited you're,also kind of going. Oh Howdo, I juspend my territory, so it's a balance between hey, there's,a new way to do things and crat. There's Ne Way to do that. I'V, gotta, figur out a new defensesystem associated with that, so I'm seeing a little bit of gas clutch, butI remain really bullish on the public sector. I still think there are bigproblems to solve. I get really excited about the technology sectors, abilityto help solve those problems and when I see technology companies trulypartnering with Government Agencies Really Sitting down and when you've gota rep who really is invested in an agency WHO's driving value along theirrelationship with the agency and beginning to build this partnership.Man, companies ought to get really excited about that and that's why I goback to time and segment right, because then you've got a rep who understandsdon only who understands the important of that relationship, but thatrelationship has a value to the REP itself, so they're not going to pushanything forward. That's not going to be a winwin right, because they've gottheir own individual reputation, andcredibility as well, and so as acompany, and I encourage the companies I work with when you see that getexcited get lined up behind it, because...

...that's when great things happen whenyou've got that partnership in that brainstorming element betweentechnology and a public sector, excellent, excellent, okay. So let'schange direction a little bit. We've got two standard questions towards theend of each interview. We like to ask our gasts the first one as an executiveyourself that that puts you in the targets a sites, sometimes for peoplewho are looking to sell to you. So I'm curious. What is it when somebody'strying to sell to you that that you don't know right and we would call itcold at cold start? What gets your attention? What makes you pay attention to somebody or respond tosomebody? Oh Man, you know I'll preface this. I almost want to take CEO out ofmy title, because I beome Y target Lin and I tel you between the linkedand.You know please. You know please connect with me, because I want to sellyou something and, and the emails that I get. Some of them are so extreme itdslaughable and you kind of go okay, so clearly they were going for humor tobreak the ice here. However, I don't have time for this, but the ones thatdo make me take notice. t make me take notice in two areas. The first is, if Ihave a reference, so if you're going to use linkedin use it intelligently,figure out who you and I have in common contact that person and say. Do youmind if I reference you in my initial email outreach right so at that's kindof tried in tru sales, one o one a referenced opportunity is a lot betterthan a cold opportunity, but I'll tell you outside of that. If you deliver tome a crisp, well targeted value proposition that doesn't force me toread through a multiple paragraphs right, for example, but that clearlyconnects to what I do improves to me that you know what I do. You've got atleast a fifty to a sixty percent chance that I'll consider replying consideringthat's better th, I mean hey, that's better than most right mean most of theTimes some people don't even open them up e Wun, open up the animals. Itrequires a level of preparation and research right doing your homeworkbefore you target somebody, excellent okay, Yeh,but it's not a tremendous amount either right, it's a baseline level of caringabout who you're engaging with just enough to understand who they are andwhat their company does. Well. I think that's actually really a point right.We spend a lot of time. I stel a lot of time with clients and sales reupworking on the fact that look you. This is a human interaction right and so allof the dynamics in plan. Any human interaction that you have there is alevel of respect. There is a level of making sure you are, you know, wastingtheir time right, that you are providing values you to it. All of thatis amplified in the sales scenario, so you want to make sure you're doing allthat. It's funny to me how many people just think well just play the numbersI'll send a thousand emails and, like ten people, respond it's like okay, butwhat kind of you know what s I say about you absolutely n. You know it's nodifferent than what I do with my clients right, I get an email, whetherit's a referral email where somebody his introduced me or I've got you knowa cold call or a relatively pocall that that's going to go out, I'm absolutelygoing to research everything I can about that company and those peoplebefore I pick up the phone. It's just that's my commitment to building a longstanding relationship, and I want them to understand that that I'm going toprovide a level of value right up front by not wasting their time having todescribe to me who they are and what they do right. I'm going to take careof that for them yeah, it's a respectthing, it's amazing to me. Idon't know if people get to focused on their number and forget that at theheart of this, what we're talking about is how do you accelerate humaninteraction and value exchange? It's amazes me: How many people just forgetabout it and you're right? It doesn't take a lot of time. It really does not:Okay Juliatt DOT. We ask all of our guests ond. Then we call anacceleration insight D. If you had sales, marketing or consultingprofessionals focused on the public sector in front of you, you howe theopportunity to give them some advice that you felt like would make that moreeffective at beating their targets. What would that advice and insiht be anwife? You know chat. I think it goes back to what we started our wholeconversation with, and that is it's not about you right. It's about thecustomer and for my perspective, each...

...customer has a story and if youunderstand the story completely, then your are with all of the facts and allthe information you need to effectively drive and manage the sale, and I thinkwe forget that quite a bit of the time we go in. We ask a couple of questionsand they might be the same couple of questions that we ask every single oneof our customers and so what I would charge public sector reps with doingand with thos actually, sales trops in general with doing is become the bestinvestigative reporter that you possibly can leverage the tools aroundyou to research. Everything you can about that customer. That agency themission that they have the challenges they have around them and there arequite a lot of tools inside of the public sectr, an outside of the publicsector, that you can use things like Google, which is fantastic forsurfacing information. There's the Fredom of Information Act which forcesagencies to post budgets and Orn, charts and program information andmission information all available to you on the website. You can go towebsites like USA spending DT GUV and actually find out what competitivetechnology has been sold O that agency before and how much and when and whothe purchasing officer was so thres there's a plesteter of information outthere, and I would encourage sales professionals and marketingprofessionals to to do your investigation ahead of time really digin understands, what's happening within that agency and within that customersworld, so that you know which questions to ask when you're with that customerand then listen really really listen. You know learn for my mistake about myGod intink an what I wanted to drive forward and take a step back and reallyconsider what the customers trying to accomplish and going again coming fullcircle. You can only do that when you ask the right questions and your teetup to listen. So that's what I would do. I would encourage each one of the salesprofessionals out there to really work on building that story almost beforethey even go in for the first meeting or the first call. So they've goteverything they need to ask th the right questions and the specificquestions that they need to ask excellent excellent. Thank you for thatGulionna! That's the show for us today, folks anybody who came back late erewants to see the blog post. Please check US out, at B to B REV exaccom, adon't hesitate to search for us on Itunes, leave a review. Please we'd,love to see those good bad worin different helps us make sure the showis valuable for you and your friends, family and coworkers, who we encourageyou to share the show with Juliatnn. I can't think you enough for the time dayas been an absolute pleasure to have you on the show. Thank you Chan. Somuch. The pleasure has been online excellent well to all our listeners,Intou Gulion, and so we talk again next time, good selling and we wisheverybody nothing, but the best. Thank you same to you, you've been listening to the BTOBrevenue executive experience to ensure that you never miss an episodesubscribe to the show in Itunes for your favorite podcast player. Thank youso much for listening until much time.

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