The B2B Revenue Executive Experience
The B2B Revenue Executive Experience

Episode · 4 years ago

Jenny Adams on Driving Revenue Through Collaboration

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

As executives grow their businesses, they often experience a lonely road of solitude and don’t think to reach out to others for support.

We spoke with Jenny Adams, chairwoman of the 12 Mavens Denver chapter, about how executives can collaborate to drive revenue and propel everyone forward to mutual benefit.

You're listening to the BDB revenue executive experience, a podcast dedicated to helping the executives train their sales and marketing teams to optimize growth. Whether you're looking for techniques and strategies or tools and resources, you've come to the right place. Let's accelerate your growth in three, two, one. Welcome everyone to the B Tob Revenue Executive Experience. I'm your host, Chad Sanderson. Today we're talking about the often lonely road many executives experiences they are focused on growing their businesses. How to overcome that solitude and connect with other like minded executives to drive revenue growth through collaboration and thought leadership hot topics today, especially for sales and marketing executives, sea level executives. The idea of collaboration to propel everyone forward to mutual benefit. And to do that, to tackle this topic today, we have with US Jenny Adams, chairwoman of twelve maven's. Jenny, thank you for taking the time and welcome to the show. Great thank you, Chad, and appreciate it. So, before we jump into the topic of the day, we like to start a little random question beginning of the episode give our listeners a little bit better understanding of view as a person and what we're bringing to the table here. So, if you look back over your career at a defining moment that happened in your career, maybe a change trajectory for you or change the direction you're headed kind of. What was that defining moment and what did you take away from it? Now, sure there's and oh so many cheap I'll pick one from recent years. I previously was a plant manager at a manufacturing plant that was making and selling over a hundred and fifty million dollars worth of products every year and I had been chosen to be in this two year leadership development training for women and there were only six women out of a hundred, out of Sixteenzero women chosen, and I was one and it was awesome and it was so amazing to be recognized and given...

...those accolades and that training to get further in my career. However, there was one person who disagreed with it, and that was my boss, and I just he and I just didn't see eye to eye and what I was feeling from everyone else in the whole company was this is amazing, she's amazing. We're going to help her succeed, we want more women at the top. And then my boss is like pushing me out, and so I left and I decided that I can still have all those accolades and hear what I want to hear and also feel into what he was saying. Right. Is this real or is it not real? But I don't have to deal with that. I don't have to have that one person D driving my entire career guts, because he really had control, that one person, even though the people above him were pulling me up, he was really in charge of my trajectory and once I let that go and became my own boss, I now have control of that trajectory. Excellent. So realization of your self, empowerment, self worth and getting out from underneath the thumb of people who maybe not as like mind. It sounds absolutely excellent. And so okay. So great lesson, great insights. And so now we're at we're chairwoman at Twelve Maven so for our listeners, can you give us a little bit more context around twelve Maven's and your roll there? Sure. So twelve Maven's is a confidential think tank. It's a mastermind group, a sounding board made up of like minded risk takers, and typically it's about twelve people. So that's where the twelve comes from. A maven is someone who is a trusted expert who shares their knowledge with others, and at twelve maven's it's a private, by invitation...

...only, community of CEOS and entrepreneurs that are from non competing companies and industries, and they join together so that they can be smarter together, because being a CEO is very lonely at the top. That's hard to you have to be the one that's in control, the one that looks like they know everything, although we all know we don't fake until you make it exactly. But doing that sometimes lead you to trouble, because you're making a decision in a vacuum sometimes, and so having twelve CEOS around a table discussing each person's issue at a time in a confidential room, I've seen all so many CEO shoulders just drop and relaxation and allow themselves to be vulnerable, which is not something a CEO ever gets to do. Typically, they're the bread winner at home, they're in charge of other people's lives and they have to seemingly have it all together and they don't always have it all together and so this group, this group of twelve, helps them feel like they're not alone, because they're not. It's a great concept, right, and we see a lot of focus on collaboration and the power of collaboration and and that that vulnerability, that authenticity, allows us all to say we don't have all the answers and and well, I know twelve mavens is focused primarily on CEOS. I'm curious is, you know, sales exacts, having been one myself and having worked with a lot of them, or marketing exacts. Those sea levels kind of across the board. Those are all pretty lonely places. Even if you're on a see level, you know, cee sweet team, there's still, you know, there's still a sense of alienation that comes and I'm curious if twelve mavens has has explored or thought about going beyond the CEOS to getting, you know, CMOC rows together and doing it that way, because I think it is...

...a powerful model. I understand why we obviously start at the top. I was going to curious if there's been any thought or, you know, any discussion around potentially expanding out the types of sea levels that you guys are focused on. So potentially in the future. However, right now we're expanding in the US. So we started in Jacksonville, Florida, in two thousand and fourteen and there's been three groups there for, you know, three to four years each, and those groups started asking Jeff Davis, who started twelve maven's and Jacksonville, to expand to other cities so that their partners could also be in groups. And right now we're in that expansion mode. So we're we're the fastest growing mastermind group on the planet right now and right right now we're focused as CEOS and eventually, once we have grown that the way we want to absolutely we could be looking at other groups. But there are other groups out there that support people who are not CEOS and and you run the Denver area set groups. Just don't want to make sure. Okay, excellent, okay. And so I was doing some reading, doing some research before the before this interview, and came across that article, actually, I think it was one you sent me, where Jeff was talking about the impacts and results that he'd seen. I'm curious what you've seen, as you've been working with and been involved the groups you mentioned. You know, CEOS relaxing and get a little bit more vulnerable. But any you know, takeaways, powerful takeaways that you've seen members of the group walk away with an implement absolutely it's fascinating to watch in meetings because, for instance, one of our CEOS was really he was a Hardass, and then we had some other CEOS that were more on the not so strong side in that same type of realm with their employees, and so they balance help each other, balance each other out, like, you could be stronger here or you don't need to be so strong there,...

...and so watch that happen in a inner room over, you know, a few hours is amazing to see that Camaraderie. And then they start saying, okay, you can help me with this and I can help you with this, and it just keeps expanding. And I've also heard conversations where there's just a five minute little blip of a description of something and someone says, Oh my God, you just save me thousands of dollars, and things like that happened every single meeting, although there are, you know, over time there's bigger things that are happening where people are growing their businesses and there's a business in one of the Florida groups that is one of the fastest growing businesses in Florida and they have recognized twelve mavens as being part of that. Oh, excellent, excellent. So I'm curious of when we see, you know, that's the concept of collaboration and thought leadership and CEO Roll is tough, right, any executive really that's responsible for the lives of other people. There's a lot of weight that comes from that and I think sometimes there's a, you know, a natural inclination for us to say, Hey, we have the answers because we believe that the people that are, you know, trusting us and following us that that's going to make them feel more comfortable. But you know, as we touched on earlier, we don't all have all of the answers. So I'm curious from your perspective why you think we've seen kind of a rise, an increase in the amount of focus put on collaboration amongst executives amounts like minded individuals. Kind of curious just to see from your experience industry kind of where that's come from and how that's kind of changing people's view of business in general. I think that as more people start businesses, they try to do it by themselves and eventually those people who only do it by themselves typically there are very, very few that actually succeed. And when people...

...we do interviews with people every month too, and we highly successful CEOS and entrepreneurs and we send those out to our members of our group and, for instance, we talk to people who are have billion dollar companies and how they grew that and we send those out so that people can get those ideas. But what happens is is those people always talk about being in a group like this and that's how they got where they were, and so the more that people are hearing about it, that it is grown, definitely, but part of it is half the people like talk to have never even heard of anything like this. One of our members was like, I have been doing running businesses and creating businesses for I don't know, twenty or thirty years, and he says I wish someone had taught me how to be a CEO. You're the first person to invite me to a group like this and I didn't even know it existed, and I wish I'd known this at the beginning. Of My career. Yeah, the the sharing of knowledge. I mean it's funny. We all take for granted Ah, we all have access to the Internet and People Think, oh well, that's going to provide all of the answers, and the fact of the matter is it really doesn't. It actually as a tendency to create more confusion. So to hear those real, authentic stories and perspectives from people that have been there, I thinks extremely empowering. HMM, for sure, we have people who fly in just for the meeting. Excellent, and so I'm curious we in our business and culture, you know, we're all seeing it. Everything's becoming more digital. Everything's almost you know, a lot of focus, especially in sales, on virtual selling not having to be facetoface, which was not how I grew up in sales and marketing. It was always face to face. But we're seeing kind of the you know, things turn around a little bit. It seems to me like twelve mayven's appears to be focus on getting back to that facetoface relationship building, and I'm curious why you feel that's so critical and important today. The more we are facetoface, obviously the human connection is extremely important and the more a CEO...

...gets off the rails, off to the side without that human connection, they lose track of what their customers want. They can lose track of what they're clients and their suppliers need because they're looking at a screen and the interaction see it. Sometimes it's just a look on someone's face in the meeting where someone says their idea and their face is like, that's not a good idea. I tried that once. I wouldn't recommend exactly. And and you get more of a personal relationship and the camaraderie that gets created in those modes. It's more of a conversation than just research online, which to me drains me when I'm doing research online. But that human connection actually helps me build excitement completely and it's interesting because, I mean, I spend, you know, a lot of time online reading and researching and then a lot of time in my head processing it. But it can be just, you know, fifteen minute meeting somebody for coffee and you float a random thought that was going through it all of a sudden you get a unique perspective and you get feedback that you wouldn't have gotten just between you and the computer screen and it changes your perspective really, you know, it's our perspectives or what we control, and the more input that we take in them in a way that we trust, you know, in a trusting, safe, kind of vulnerable fashion, the better we become, the more informed we become and I think we make better decisions. I think, having worked for some CEO's, probably that guy that he said was a hard ass. I've got work for that guy. I think it would behoove, you know, everyone to spend some time doing and spending more time with their peers in an authentic and and vulnerable way exactly. One of the cool things that happens in the meeting is people bring their issue that they want the whole group to discuss and I'm told by most of the members that they get more out of the other people's issues than the one they brought...

...because they hadn't even thought to ask the question. Oh Yeah, you get so focused on one or two particular things you don't think about looking at it from another perspective, where you don't think about all of the other things that you need to be juggling at the same time. Absolutely so. I read, I read in that Business Journal Article That Jeff Likes to quote, and this literly quote focus on the element of surprise in the meetings and I noticed in the article that said he's invited, you know, guests and presenters from sits, our players to comedians and everything else. Right, I understand he's trying to create, you know, creative environment, safe, relaxing, mind expanding, so to speak. So I am curious to know what you've seen. Is like the most surprising guests that one of these meetings. We have an annual meeting in Florida where all the CEOS from all the groups get together, and at that meeting, it was in December this year, and at the very, very end, Jeff brought in an entire the entire drum line from the Jackson Bill Jaguires into the ball into this ball room, and I was like, I never would have thought to have that loud of a drumming crew. They're so hyped up in a room and it was mind opening. Like what else am I not thinking about? Right, what else would have would I not have tried? So it wasn't just about the entertainer. Well, that's just it pumped us up, but it was just it started going oh I hadn't thought about that. Well, that's just a right way. I have a feeling that many people get so caught up in what they know and their own little bubbles. Right. I think that's probably what leads to all the news we hear about, you know, fake news and people only getting one source of information. It's dangerous. We've seen some of the negative consequences I can have you know, culturally, but I think it's doubly dangerous in business, especially for the leadership, if the leadership is so narrowly focused...

...that they're not taking the time. We used to call it staring out the window. We used always budget time for staring out the window and let your you know, just let the thoughts go, and now things move so fast it's really much more advantageous to spend that time in a elaborative, creative environment. So I love the fact that the drum line was in there. Would have loved to have seen that and seen the looks on the other people's faces. MMMM. And the other thing that happens is that because the companies are non competing, as you said, you can get caught in your bubble and the reason why we have the different companies in there that are from different industries. is so that you can take ideas that you hadn't even thought of because your industry works this way, and get those ideas and add them to your industry. And that's how disruption happens. It's not from inside the industry. Right, cross pollination, unique perspectives, shared experiences, exactly. So all right, so let's change reaction a little bit. Towards the end of each interview we ask two standard questions and you know your chairwoman for Twelve Mavens here in Denver, and so I'm sure that puts you in sales parlance. We would call you a target. In the politically cracked parlance, we would call you a prospect. But I'm sure there are people out there that are trying to get in front of you, get your attention and capture some of your mind share. We always like to ask our guests, you know, what is it when somebody that you don't know is trying to connect with you? What is it that captures your attention and builds credibility? Several, several things. One is to keep it short and simple, because people who are running their own companies don't have a lot of time and so if you send too much too fast, it just is overwhelming and we click away for men or walk away or don't schedule a phone call. But you need to find something to make their lives easier and provide a solution for that, and part of that is how you you're selling to them. Are you making their lives easier...

...by selling to them in a long email? Probably not, are you? Someone told me they buy lunch for someone during their busy season. They bring in lunch for the person's entire staff and that's how they get in their door. I was like, well, that makes it easy for them. They don't have to plan anything, they don't have to do anything on their own and that person already builds that rapport right. There is a difference between men and women and selling and women tend to think longer about what we're going to do, but in general, men are more visual and thinking and women are more feeling. So if you can appeal to a woman's feelings versus talking to her in very logical manner, you can win over more women. Excellent, great point. Great Point. Okay, last question. We call it our acceleration in sight. There's one thing you could tell let's usually say sales and marketing people. If there's one thing you could tell like sea level executives, entrepreneurs, one piece of advice that we give them that you believe would help them, you know, be more successful starting tomorrow morning if they heard you and applied it. What would it be? And why stop doing this by yourself? You don't have all the answers. You don't even have all the questions. I love it. I love that quote. That's going to be one of the quotes we put in the graphics, as you know. I love it. Excellent, perfect, Jenny. If a listeners interested in talking more about the topics we touched on today, best way to get in touch with you to talk further about twelve mavens or your experience and insights, sure they can either contact me on linkedin or they can email me at Jenny j n n. Why a at twelve maven'scom and the twelve and twelve maven's is the number one two. Excellent today. I can't think enough for taking the time. It's been great having on the show today. Great. Thank you so much. I appreciate the time and it's been a pleasure. All right,...

...everyone that does it for this episode. Please check us out at be tob REV exaccom. share the episodes with friends, Families Co workers. If you like what you hear, do his favorite as review on itunes and as walk away from this, remember it's always better to work and collaborate with others. You're not alone. You don't even know how to an you don't even know the right questions to ask, as Jenny said. So please take the time, work with your friends, work with your co workers and until next time, we have value prime solutions. With you all, nothing but the greatest success. You've been listening to the BB revenue executive experience. To ensure that you never miss an episode, subscribe to the show and Itunes or your favorite podcast player. Thank you so much for listening. Until next time,.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (250)