The B2B Revenue Executive Experience
The B2B Revenue Executive Experience

Episode · 3 years ago

Jenny Adams on Driving Revenue Through Collaboration

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

As executives grow their businesses, they often experience a lonely road of solitude and don’t think to reach out to others for support.

We spoke with Jenny Adams, chairwoman of the 12 Mavens Denver chapter, about how executives can collaborate to drive revenue and propel everyone forward to mutual benefit.

You're listening to the BTB revenueexecutive experience, a podcast, dedicated ELP O executives train theirsales and marketing teams to optimize growth, whether you're looking fortechniques and strategies were tools and resources. You've come to the rightplace. Let's accelerate your growth in three to one: welcome everyone to the Bto b revenue executive experience. I'm your host Chat Sanderson today we'retalking about the often lonely road, many executives experiences. They arefocused on growing their businesses. How to overcome that solitude andconnect with other, like minded executives to drive revenue growthrough collaboration and thought leadership. Hot Topics today,especially for sales and marketing executives, sea level, executives theidea of collaboration to propel everyone forward to mutual benefit, andto do that to tackle this topic. Today we have with US Jenny, Adams,chairwoman of Twelve Mavens Jenny. Thank you for taking the time andwelcome to the show it think you Chad, O appreciate it. So before we jump intothe topic of the day, we like started a little random question. Beginning ofthe episode give our listeners a little bit better understanding of viewers, aperson and what we bringing to the table here. So if you look back overyour career at a defining moment that happened inyour career, maybe it changed trajectory for you or change thedirection, youereheaded kind of what was that defining moment, and what didyou take away from it? YEA share, there's been: Oh, so many s I'll pick one from recent years. I previously was the plant manager at amanufacturing plant that was making and selling over a hundred andfifty million dollars worth of products every year, and I had been chosen to bein this two year: Leadership, development,training for women, and there were only six women out of a hundred out ofsixteen thousand women Cholden, and I was one and it was awesome, and it wasso amazing to be...

...recognized and given those acolades andthat training to get further in my career. However, there was one personwho disagreed with it, and that was my boss and I justhe, and I just didn't- see eitherey and what I was feeling from everyone else in the whole company was. This isamazing, she's amazing we're going to help her succeed. We want more women atthe top and then my boss is like pushing me Feut, and so I left, and I decided that I canstill have all those accolades and hear what I want to hear and also feel into what he was saying right. Is this real or isit not real, but I don't have to deal with that. I don't have to have thatone person driving my entire career cips because he really had control thatone person, even thougthe people above him, were pulling me up. He was reallyin charge of my trajectory and once I let that go and became my own boss. Inow have control of that trajectory, excellent, so realization of your selfempowerment, self worth and getting out from underneath the thumb of people whomaybe not as like minded so absolutely excellent ad. So, okay, so great lesson,great insights and so now we're at were t chairwomen at twelve mamen. So forour listeners, can you give us a little bit more context around twelve mavensand and your role there sure so? Twelve Mavins is a confidential thing tank.It's a mastermind group. It a sounding board, made up of likeminded risktakers and typically it's about twelve people. So that's where the twelvecomes from Amaben is someone who is a trustedexpert who shares their knowledge with others and at twelve mavens. It's aprivate by invitation, only community...

...of CEOS, an entrepreneurs that are fromnoncompeting companies and industries and they join together so that they can be smarter together because being a CEOis very lonely at the top. It's hard to. You have to be the one: that's incontrol, the one that looks like they know everything, although we all knowwe don't tank Ittil, you make it exactly, but doing that sometimes lead you totrouble because you're making a decision in a vacuum sometimes and sohaving twelve CEOS around a table disgusting, each person's issue. At atime in a confidential rum, I've seen all so many CEOS shoulders,just drop and relaxation and allow themselves to be vulnerable, which isnot something a CEO ever gets to do. Typically, they're the bread winner athome, theyre in charge of other people's lives, andthey have to seemingly have it all together and they don't always have itall together, and so this group, this group of twelve, helps them feel like they're, not alone, becausethey're, not it's a great concept right and we see alot of focus on collaboration and the power of collaboration and and thatthat vulnerability that authenticity t allows us all to say. We don't have allthe answers and well I know twelve mamens is focused primarily on CEOS.I'm curious is you know, sales exacts, having been one myself and havingworked with a lot of them ore marketing exacts those sea levels kind of acrossthe board. Those are all pretty lonely places, even if you're, on a SE level,you know CSWEET team. There's still, you know, there's still a sense ofalieation that comes and I'm curious. If Twelve Mavensas has explored orthought about going beyond the CEOS to getting. You know CMO Crros togetherand doing it that way, because I think...

...it is a powerful model. I understandwhy we obviously started the top. I'm just kind of curious. If there's beenany thought or you know any discussion around potentially expanding out of thetypes of sea levels that you guys are focused on so potentially in the future.However, right now we're expanding in the US, so we started in JacksonvilleFlorida in two thousand and fourteen and there's been three groups there.For you know three to four years: Each and those groups started asking JeffDavis, who started twelve mavans and Jacksonville to expand to other citi sothat their partners could also be in groups and right now we're in thatexpansion mode, so we're the fastest growing mastermine group on the planet.Right now and right right now, we're focused os CEOS and eventually, once wehave grown that the way we want to absolutely. We couldbe looking at other groups, but there are other groups out there that supportpeople who are not Seos, and you run the Denver Area SA groups just tain tomake sure okay, excellent okay, and so I was doing some reading doing someresearch before the before this interview, and s came across thatarticle Achuas think it was one you edme where Jeff was talking about theimpacts and results that he'd seen I'm curious, what you've seen as you'vebeen working with and been involved it. The groups you mentioned, you know, cos,relaxing and get a little bit more vulnerable, but any you know takeawayspowerful takeaways that you've seen members of the group walk away with animplement. Absolutely it's fascinating to watch in meetings because, for instance, one of our CEOS wasreally he was a Artass, and then we had some other ceos thatwere more on the knot so strong side in that same type of real with theiremployees, and so they balane help each other balance each other out like youcould be stronger here or you don't...

...need to be so strong there and to watch that happen in a in a room over you know. Afew hours is amazing to see that Camaraderie and then they start saying.Okay, you can help me with this, and I can help you with this and it just keeps expanding, and I'vealso heard conversations where there's just a five minute. Little Blip of thedescription of something- and someone says: Oh my God, you just save methousands of dollars, but and things like that happen, everysingle meeting, although there are you, know, overtime, there's bigger thingsthat are happening where people are growing their businesses and there's a business in one of theFlorida groups. That is one of the fastest growing businesses in Floridaand they have recognized twelve mavens as being part of that, oh excellent,excellent. So I'm curious when we see you know this, the concept ofcollaboration and thought leadership and CEO role is tough right, any anyexecutive, really that's responsible for the lives of other people, there'sa lot of weight. That comes from that and I think sometimes there's a youknow a natural inclination for us to say: Hey. We have the answers becausewe believe that the people that are you know trusting us and following us thatthat that's going to make them feel more comfortable. But you know, as wetouched on earlier, we don't all have all of the answer. So I'm curious fromyour perspective why you think we've seen kind of rise on an increase in theamount of focus put on collaboration amongst executives, abont,likeminded individuals, kind of curious just to see from your experience inhistory kind of where that's come from and how that's kind of changingpeople's view of business in general. I think that as more people start businesses, they tryto do it by themselves and eventually those people who only do it bythemselves- typically thereare, very, very few that actually succeed, andwhen people we do interviews with...

...people every month to and we highlysuccessful CEOS an entrepreneurs and we send those out to our members of ourgroup and, for instance, we talk to people who ere have billion dollarcompanies and how they grew that and we send those out so that people canget those ideas. But what happens is? Is those people always talk about beingin a group like this and that's how they got where they were, and so themore that people are hearing about it that it has grown? Definitely but partof it is half the people. I talk to have never even heard of anything like this. One of ourmembers was like, I have been doing, running businesses and creatingbusinesses, for I don't know twenty or thirty years, and he says I wishsomeone had taught me how to be a CEO you're, the first person to invite meto a group like this, and I didn't even know, hat existed, and I wish I'd knownthis at the beginning of my career yeah, the sharing of knowledge, I mean it'sfunny we all take for granted or we all have access to the Internet and peoplethink oh well, that's going to provide all of the answers and the fact of thematter is it really doesn't actually has a tendency to create more confusion,so to hear those real authentic stories and perspectives from people that havebeen there. I thinks extremely a power for sure we have people who fly in justfor the meeting, yeah excellent, and so I'm curious. We in our business andculture. You know we're all seeing it everything's becoming more digitaleverything's. Almost you know a lot of focus, especially in sales on virtualselling not having to be face to face which was not how I grew up in salesand marketing. It was always ase to face, but we're seeing kind of that.You know things turn around a little bit. It seems to me, like twelve mavinsappears to we focus on getting back to that face to face relationship buildingand I'm curious why you feel that so critical and important today, the more we are face to face. Obviouslythe human connection is extremely...

...important and the more a CEO gets offthe rails off to the side. Without that human connection, they lose track of what their customerswant. They can lose track of what their clients and their suppliers need,because they're looking at a screen and the Interaction Se. Sometimes it's justa look on someone's face in the meeting where someone says their idea and theirface is like that's, not a good idea. I tried that once I wouldn't recommendexactl an and you get more of a personal relationship and the camaraderie that gets created inthose modes. It's more of a conversation than just research onlinewhich to me drains me when I'm doing research online, but that humanconnection actually helps me build excitement, oh yeah completely. I it's interestingbecause I mean I spend you know a lot of time online reading and researchingand then a lot of time in my head processing it, but it can be just a youknow. Fifteen minutes meeting somebody for coffee and you float a randomthought that was going through and all of a sudden, you get a uniqueperspective and you get feedback that you wouldn't have gotten just betweenyou and the computer screen, and it changes your perspective. Really. Youknow it's. Our perspectives are what we control and the more input that we takthem in a way that we trust ou know in a trusting, safe kind of vulnerablefashion, the better we become the more informed we become, and I think we makebetter decisions. I think, having worked for some COS, probably that guythat Yo said was a Hardass IV got work for that guy. I think it would bevove.You know everyone to spend some time doing, spending more time with theirpeers and an authentic and and vulnerable way. Exactly one of the coolthings that happens in the meeting is people bring their issue that they wantthe whole group to discuss, and I'm told by most of the members that theyget more out of the other people's...

...issues than the one they brought,because they hadn't even thought to ask the Question: Oh Yeah, you get sofocused on one or two particular things you don't think about looking at itfrom another perspective where you don't think about all of the otherthings that you need to be juggling at the same time. Absolutely so I read. Iread in that Business Ertal article that Jeff likes to quote- and thisliterally quote focus on the element of surprise in the meetings, and I noticedin the article it said, he's invited you know, guests and presenters fromcitar players to comedians and everything else right. I understandhe's trying to create. You know creative environment safe, relaxing,mind expanding so to speak. So I am curious to know what you'veseen is. Like the most surprising guest that one of these meetings, we have an annual meeting in Florida,where all the CEOS from all to groups get together and at that meeting it was in December thisyear and at the very very end, Jeff brought in an entire the entiredrum line from the JACKSONBUILD jaguires into the ball into thisballroom, and I was like I never would have thought to have that loud of adrumming crew, they're, so hyped up in e room, and it was mind opening like what else am I notthinking about what else would have what I not havetried? So it wasn't just about the entertainer wel that just pumped us up, but it wasjust it started going. Oh, I hadn't thought about that. Well, N, that's just the right way! Ihave a feeling that many people get so caught up in what they know and theirown little bubbles right. I think that's probably what leads all the newswe hear about. You know fake news and people only getting one source ofinformation as dangerous. We've seen some of the negative consequences thatcan have. You know culturally, but I think it's doubly dangerous in business,especially for the leadership. If the...

...leadership is so narrowly focused thatthey're not taking the time we used to call it staring out the window. We'veused always budget time for staring at the window, and let your you know justlet the thoughts go and now things move so fast. It's really much moreavantageous to spend that time in a collaborative creative environment. SoI love the fact that the drum line was in there would have loved to have seenthat and seen the looks on the other people's faces, and the other thingthat happens is that, because the companies are non competing, as yousaid, you can get caught in your bubble and the reason why we have the different companies in there that arefrom different industries is so that you can take ideas that you hadn't,even thought of, because your industry works this way and get those ideas and add them toyour industry and that's how disruption happens. It's not from inside theIndustry Right Cross, pollination, unique perspectives, shared experiencesexactly so all right. So, let's change teraction a little bit towards the endof each interview. We ask two standard questions and- and you know yourchairwoman for Twelve Mavens here in Denver, and so I'm sure that puts youin sales parancs, we we would call you a target in the politically crack parlons. Whowould call you a prospect, but I'm sure there are people out there that aretrying to get in front of you, get your attention and capture some of yourmindshaire. We always like to ask for guest, you know what is it whensomebody that you don't know is trying to connect with you? What is it thatcaptures your attention and builds credibility? Se several things one is to keep itshort and simple, because people who are running their own companies don'thave a lot of time, and so, if you send too much too fast, it just isoverwhelming and we click away from it or walk away or don't schedule a phonecall. But you need to find something to maketheir lives easier. Ton provide a solution for that, and part of that ishow you're selling to them. Are you...

...making their lives easier by selling tothem in a long email? Probably not a someone told me: they buy lunch forsomeone during their busy season. They bring in lunch for the person's entirestaff and that's how they get in their door. I was like well that makes it easy forthem. They don't have to plan anything. They don't have to do anything on their own and that personalready builds that report right. There is a difference between men and womenand seling and women tend to think longer about whatwe're going to do, but in general men are more visual andthinking and women are more feeling. So if you can appeal to a woman's feelingsversus talking to her in very logical manner, you can win over more women.Excellent Great Point, Greay Point: Okay, last question: We call Id ouracceleration insike. There's one thing you could tell: let's usually say salesar markinging people would. If there's one thing you could tell like sea level,executives, entrepreners, one piece of advice that U Wou give them that youbelieve would help them. You know be more successful starting tomorrowmorning. If they heard you and applied it. What would it be? And why stopdoing this by yourself? You don't have all the answers. Youdon't even have all the questions. Oh I love it. I love that quote. That'sgoing to be one of the cuotes we put in the graphics, Jus see it. I love itexcellent, perfect Jenny. If a listeners interested in talking moreabout the topics we've touched on today, best way to get in touch with you totalk further about twelve mavins or your experience, it insights sure theycan either contact me on linkedin or they can email me at Jenny, je nn Y, aat twelve mavenscom and the twelve and twelve mavens is the number one twoexcellent. So I can't think you know of taking the time it's been great. HavingY on the show today great. Thank you so much appreciate the time and it's beena pleasure all right, everyone that...

...does it for this episode. Please checkus out. Ot BTB REVIZECCOM share the episodes with friends, FamiliesCoworkers Yeeu, like would you hear to his favorite rediserview on itunes andas walk away from this? Remember, it's always better to work and collaboratewith others. You're not alone. You don't even know how to en you don'teven know the right questions. Tho Ask as Jenny said. So, please take the timework with your friends work with your coworkers and until next time we avalueprime solutions with you all nothing, but the greatest success you've been listening to the btobrevenue executive experience to ensure that you never miss an episodesubscribe to the show in Itunes for your favorite podcast player. Thank youso much for listening until next time.

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