The B2B Revenue Executive Experience
The B2B Revenue Executive Experience

Episode · 3 years ago

How to Establish a Culture of Phenomenal Customer Experience with Sarindar Frost

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

There Are No Internal Interactions Anymore. Every Interaction Is a Customer Interaction

We claim to understand the importance of customer experience. Yet, too often we fail to truly internalize how customer experience affects buyer behavior, and impacts the way individuals interact with brands, with sellers, and with marketers.

We invited Sarindar Frost to help us take a deeper look.

Sarindar is the Senior Director of eCommerce Customer Service at DHL for the Asia Pacific region.

She joined us on The B2B Revenue Executive Experience to discuss how industries across the world are being transformed by a deeper understanding of customer experience.



You're listening to the BDB revenue executive experience, a podcast dedicated to helping executives train their sales and marketing teams to optimize growth. Whether you're looking for techniques and strategies or tools and resources, you've come to the right place. Let's accelerate your growth in three, two, one. Welcome everyone to the B Tob Revenue Executive Experience. I'm your host, Chads Henderson. Today we're heading back into the topic of customer experience with a unique perspective. Many of us understand how critical customer experience is, but we fail to truly internalize how this is changing buying behaviors, expectations, the way individuals interact with brands, with sellers, with marketers. To tackle the topic today we have with a surrender frost, senior director Customer Services for DHL ECOMMERCE, sort of thank you so much for taking the time and welcome to the show. Thank you chat. So it's good to be on the show. Excellent. So, before we jump in, we always like to ask us a little question. They get to know you a little bit better, and right now it's the kind of the one where we're going with as if you think about something that you're passionate about outside of work, some hobby or something somewhere you like to spend your time that people that you work with might be surprised to learn. Would love to know what that hobby is and and what you find so so resonating about it. I love doing lots of things. Actually, travel is one, but the thing that I think people will not know about me is I like to get involved with charity, primarily helping out the young the disadvantage as well as the elderly. I do help out once a month at a home that helps people with mental challenges, and I find that very, very fulfilling because it gets you back to ground level, thinking about the basics and really about helping your fellow human beings. Keeps you connected with with the humanity of everything.

That's great, absolutely so, all right, sorry. Topic today is customer experience, but let's start with some kind of some context around. You Roll at DHL ECOMMERCE. Sure. So. I've been with DHL a total of around about twenty nine years Chad, and mainly in the areas of customer services, as we traditionally used to call customer experience. At the time, customer services contact centers really about setting them up, developing them, bringing them to world class levels. And I've also done key account management, looking after the top hundred customers for DHL, the express division, in terms of pre and poor sales, you know, looking after around about seven hundred and fifty million euros worth of revenue. So really supporting the customer and I do enjoy, I think that's my calling. You enjoy, you know, interacting with the customer, understanding customers requirements, whether they are difficult or not, and working through that process to get to a point where hopefully it's a win win situation for the customer end for DHL as an organization. And so that's a Bo mean that's a pretty brobing twenty nine years. That's to be applotted. We don't hear that very often anymore. So congratulations on that, but I mean that gives you a great perspective, though, across how customer experience, at least from the organizational perspective, how DHLs changed their view of customer experience? Have you seen over the years that there's been an increase in the amount of focus that the organization has given to it or the funding that they've allotted for things that they believe will actually drive a greater customer experience. Absolutely, Chad. So when I joined customer service as a customer service agent in one thousand nine hundred and eighty nine, there was very little thought and I don't think it was purposefully done. Those very little what about training, getting the...

...right people, ensuring that they were fully capable before, you know, getting on the calls with customers? Today, I think a lot more fought, a lot more investment has gone in to ensuring that we get the right people, with the right profiles, with obviously the right renumeration, the right training and onboarding that we do with our agents. And, of course, the expectations of the agents is also more broad. Right where before we would use, you know, the agents would primarily take calls from customers, today is more of an omnichannel approach where the agents are not only taking calls but answering emails between life chats, responding to customers on facebook and twitter. So, you know, we need a little bit of a different breed of people to answering these questions from the customers in this omnichannel approach and I feel that certainly not in need h Oel, but the other organizations I've interacted with the past fifteen to twenty years have really invested in the area of Customer Services and you know, they feel that it is a differentiator. So it's no longer just talk about they're putting their money where their mouth is and doing the right thing in terms of investing in customer services, customer experience and ensuring that the customer gets the right, I would say the right experience and the right value from the organization. Well, it's almost today, I mean it's you really don't have a choice right customers. Customers vote with their dollars and if you're not where they are when you want them there or interacting in a way that makes sense from their perspective, it's very easy in some cases, I mean unless it's a huge, long, multi year contract, it's very easy sometimes for customers to go other places. And so that every touch point, that Omni...

...channel approach you mentioned is so critical. I think the challenge are sometimes as organizations, really have to believe in the customer experience in or to aggressively, and maybe aggressively is not the right word. How about how about, in a focused manner, work to ensure that those Omni channel elements are all inline, then delivering a consistent experience that's true to the brand promise. Have you seen them be kind of a challenge for DHL as more investment has gone in, is more channels interact with customers have come online? Yes, I think you know. Going back to your point, a little Chad about customers these days, right in the S and S, customers had one channel to contact and organization being they have multiple channels and platforms and they are happy to voice out their concerns and issues online, and that's the reason why more and more organization organizations are investing in an Omni channel approach and getting the right people, because the people are essential. The people are the ones who are going to be looking at the Omni channel contact that the customer has, looking at the contacts of the issues the customer has. And you know, sometimes when we type something, we want to say something but we might mean something else. So reading between the lines has become even more essential than before. But also prompt and proactive communication is also critical. And from an organizational perspective, you know, when we look at customer experience, it's about all of the touch points the customer has with an organization, be at DHL, beat Amazon, beat Apple, when the customer interfaces with the organization either through the traditional manner of customer services the context center. All you know a career delivering a package...

...to you or someone interfacing with a billing clerk or agent. All these manifests a certain experience in the customers head. Organizations should not discount this. So they should look at the customer experience from a holistic perspective, from an organizational perspective, not just from a customer service and a context center perspective. Yeah, I couldn't agree more. I've found a lot of time with organizations mapping customer journeys and touch points and and friction points and and it's always interesting to me. There's certain elements of an organization that are more than every tendency to accept it more or understand it more, like, okay, understand how this interaction with my prospector customer could have caused some friction. And then there are other elements of the organization, perhaps just because of the way they focus, whether we you know finance, to tell somebody in finance, Hey, the way you invoice creates an oppression I often see very confused looks on finance people's face when we start talking about customer experience. Absolutely I think everyone's got to get on board on this customer experience and think about you know, as you example, Chad, about the billing in voice, we've got to think of it from a customer perspective. We cannot, we can no longer think of it from an internal organizational perspective, being especially when they is that interface with the customer on that particular point. Well, and it's so it's kind to the point where, like said, there was always there was one channel the begin with and now there's so many it's hard to keep track of all the time. I'm curious how have you found, what have you found to be the most effective in terms of assessing your customers perception of the customer experience? Were measuring in are their tools or techniques or approaches that you have found to be very successful and kind of setting that baseline for what the experience should be in measuring how the team is doing against it? Absolutely so. At DHL, well, we do have an Omni channel approach to customers in interfacing with...

...them, with us and the customer can provide us just about with any inquiry, any complained, even a claim, and so and so forth. And the agents need to be need to ensure that they know how to handle every angle and every channel of the interface that we have with the customer. The key for us really is, as I said before Wat Chair, and I can't emphasize enough, is getting the right people to interact with the customer through these multiple channels, getting the right people doing the training and then having internal kpis that understand and allow us to analyze what are we main positives of what we're doing, as well as the main challengers and the improvements that we need to make. That's very much from an internal perspective. From an external perspective, we do ensure that every at every touch point, we do give the customer an opportunity to feedback on the surface. Now we don't do that all the time because we don't want to upset the customer either or bombard the customers too much information. So what we do is, if a customer, contexts are contacts us to regularly, if on a on a thirty day period, we send him or her just a little SMS and say, would you like to provide some feedback and it's a very simple, straightforward way of providing us with the feedback. It's an Uber like response, one to five stars, a smiley or a sad face, and then some comments that could be put in, because we're very much aware that, as much as we have things under control internally to provide a good service, whether then that reflects a good experience from a customer perspective or not, very much has to be provided from a from a feedback perspective. And then, of course, we do have...

...the traditional way of going to the customer and also asking them to respond from a net promoter perspective. So again, in summary, we look at it from an internal perspective, get our ducts in a role for that and then ensure that externally, the customer as is able to provide feedback and then we are able to continuously improve on our experience with the customer. When it's a journey right, I mean the the net promoter scorers and those types of feedback loops that you have. First you have to be very careful that you don't inundate them with those because that can create friction. So how do you find that balance? But being able to at least have that feedback loop. I would think allows your organization, if it's working in a kind of an adule Omni channel fashion, to incorporate that feedback quickly so that if if there's an error friction point is discovered, then they can be addressed and not repeated. Is that kind of the hope and kind of the focus that we're going after with the feedback loops? Absolutely, and the feedback again, you know, far too many organizations are concerned, and I think apfully concerned sometimes when they get negative feedback. For me it's an opportunity, it's an important opportunity to improve and when we look at the improvements from an internal perspective, this is something that I've tried to inculcate in the customer service organization that I run. It's when we get feedback when we want, when we want to make changes and do things that are right or the customer for the organization, we need to look at it, as you said, Chad, from an agile perspective. Right, we've got two things. Think things through. We've got to do the right thing and we've got to implement. But let's not get so hung up that we need to get it perfect before it's done. We have an agile approach to say, okay, this is the issue, this is what we want to do. We thought through it, this is what we feel is the right approach and might solution for this issue. Put it in...

...place right I always tell my people. Just put it in place, get it done and then get the feedback and then do the improvement from there. Don't be afraid to make changes. Don't wait until it's perfect, don't take too long so you know, be sensitive from a time perspective, do the right things, think it through, but put it in place and then have continuous improvement and, as you say earlier, Chad, the customer will understand. They do understand that things can go wrong, but they are willing to go through that journey of change with us as long as we're honest with them and we open and we are agile and quick in responding and and changing things when I think that probably comes back down just to the human nature of wanting to be heard, wanting to feel is if you're hurt and is it and as if you were. Perspective and feedback is important. I think it's challenging for organization, or has proven to be challenging in the past for a global organizations to be responsive at the individual level yet predictable enough at the global revenue level to drive the types of returns that they want to investors. It's been a very delicate balance. I just think we're seeing, and correct if I'm wrong, I think we're seeing more technology enablement that allows that to be the case and be a reality. Absolutely I think I think you've hit the nail on the hid in terms of balancing cost, revenue and Morgins for organizations and the investment in people, in training, in processes and Kpis, but also in technology. But I'm a firm believer that if you've got the first components right, we've got the right people, the might training, the right attitude and culture, then the technology comes in behind that in order to enhance that overall experience. And it's and I'm curious when I'm sure, like most organizations, you know the MARTECH space. I think they're at over six thou companies.

So there's a heck of a lot of options for tools out there and I'm sure that every organization goes through a learning process. Which one's work best for their organization or actually deliver on their promises. I would love to understand kind of how you guys have settled on that technology, what technology guys are currently using that you find the most flexible and a B and gives the ability to really make that connection with the individuals and really have an impact on that CX. HMM, good question actually, Chad, and quite a few angles. So we could take on that. So you know, I think the important thing for us was our experience was to understand our strategy. You know, what is it we want to do? The here and now visa be the future and from a logistics perspective, obviously we've got to look at the business to business and component as well as the business to customer component, and the interaction on that is actually quite different. The customer experience is quite different. I think for us it was also important to make sure that we had our internal processes documented and understood and improved on and we had the customer journey mapping done as well. And from there I think we looked at what are our requirements for technology and we did our own research and we did you know, when we did this research, we did it from dual perspective. We looked at startups as well, and we looked at the more traditional technology organizations and what they could provide, and the key was flexibility, because we want to have an agile approach to this and, to be friend with you, the flexibility came more from the startups then the traditional tech organizations. So what we've done is we've done quite a few tie ups from a telephony perspective, from an Omni Channel perspective, looking at self. Helped tools like chat bots...

...and so and so forth. So I experience really is get your internal ducts in a row, make sure you understand your processes, your requirements, then go out into the big white world and streamline. You know who can provide solutions to requirements. Work with those organizations. And the other thing we found very help whula was to actually have focus groups with organizations that were already using this technology and getting their feedback in terms of what was working for them, what wasn't looking for them, how was their implementation journey, what were the lessons learned, and so on so forth, and a lot of organizations I actually quite helpful and they are happy to share this information with you so that you it helps you along in your journey. Excellent. So how long just had a curiosity? How long did that process take? Or once you guys decided, okay, we've got our strategy, that we're going to do our research, how long did you research before you started to engage with those companies and learn more about what kind of solutions they really had or whether they could do versus, you know, digging through the marketing fluff? Yeah, so it was you know, once we got ass said our internal house in order, we took about three months to have a look around, to have informal discussions with potential organizations, and once we had filtered and shortlisted a number of organizations, we then said to these organizations, can you please give us some business cases? Can you also let us interface with customers that are willing to do so, in who have purchased and are using your technology effectively? And you know, it took another month or so to reach out to have these discussions with organizations that were using crm telephony technology and getting them to, you...

...know, just advise us by email via phone what their thoughts were on this technology and just as seeing fairly direct questions and having the same set of questions that you would ask each of these organizations so that you could get a more synchronized to view on their thoughts on the utilization of the technology. And what part of the process did you find? You know, I mean it's always interesting, right. So you're focused on customer experience, you're focused on getting the right technology to Annali your strategy. However, as you go through that process as a buyer, you're getting a taste of the experience that these other organized positions are providing, based on the way that they're selling and engaging with you. Yes, and so I'm curious how how that impacted perhaps your your decision or the were the ways that you interacted with those organizations? Did that play any part in it? I think, of course. I think as humans, you know, we do click with certain people and you know, at the end of the day, chat the products and services are fairly similar that these organizations were proposing to us, but I think the key was relationship, getting to know the person who will be supporting you, not only in the sales process but the implementation process, the approach that that organization would take in terms of the pricing mechanism, the Demo, the implementation flexibility in terms of obviously, from a cost perspective, but also enhancing. This is the the platform version of the technology. But what else can we do? How else can we do it? And so on, so forth. So, you know, it's always about the relationship and the flexibility and the organization getting...

...to know your business as well so that they understand where you're coming from, what your requirements are, and they push and they help you push those through. Excellent. And so may I ask her, what are you guys currently using? What is your what's that text Dec look like? So we have, depending on we've got seven markets across Asia at the moment chat. So from a telephony perspective, it's very much local telephony provide us that we've gone for, primarily due to telecommunication stress want to manage. And then the crm tool were currently using is sales force, sales forcecom that is primarily used, and we see that from the time we've implemented sales force to what we utilizing it for today and what we want to utilize it for in the future is you know, we do have a development path to take and sometime I supposed to get there as well, but it's an ongoing process and it's constantly working with sales force, for example, and ensuring that they understand where we're coming from, what we want to do the here and now and in the future, as well as how they can support and then the implementation and of course, primary to everything is the cost and managing that. Sure, so sales force. Usually when when I talk to people, I'm used to sales for serving as kind of the call system of record, the three hundred sixty degree view of your customers, but there's often, you know, other things on top of it, or maybe it's chat by. Honestly, I don't know. We're getting beyond my I know sales force from sales perspective, but from a marketing perspective, are they doing? Are they providing you the chat by functionality or the chat channel functionality? Are they providing the email and all that stuff? So they do provide the Omni channel interfaces that you can have.

So they do provide, of course, this. You know, if it's a call coming through, the agent will be able to register the inquiry. If it's an email, it automatically interfaces place book twitter. The other interesting thing were working with sales force and our internal development team is more and more customers at least I can only speak in Asia. Are Using messaging tools like what's that like Qq in China Line in Thailand in order to interface with our contact center, and we are now building that interface so that when a line inquiry comes in, it automatically gets generated as an enquiry in sales force and you know, and then we can follow up and do communications via sales force and line as well. So this is an interesting art. They do provide the chat bought solution as well, and that's something we are looking at at this point in time. We are as teenning whether the chat bought functionalities one thing with something we want to do internally or something we want to go via sales force on. And then sales force can also provide, through the marketing cloud, the ability, as we said, to get feedback from the customer after an inquiries closed on sales force and SMS can be sent to the customer to provide feedback. So that is something they utilizing as well. Excellent, and so when we look at the future, I mean it sounds like sales force becomes the core of it, but are there? I mean I'm sure you're keeping eyes on everybody has to do these days. Are you keeping eyes on kind of the new things coming out? What are you the most excited about that's on the horizon? Technology Wis, technology wise are on the horizon, I think. Certainly virtual assistance. That's something that we're looking at. CHATBOT, obviously is part of it. I saw a very interesting video and...

...apologies but I can't remember the name of it, but it's a you know, instead of a virtual agent, it's actually a Hologram of an agent on your phone, wow, on your computer. It's a link that sent to a customer. Hologram comes up to explain to the customer, you know say, for example, these are the changes to your contract, easily the last. So instead of reading through a contract, there's a Hologram and artificial intelligence that's explaining things to you and you can interact with this Hologram like you interact with an agent. Of course there are some limitations in terms of the analytics behind mind it, but that can be built on like a chat pot, but this is so much more interactive and that to me, I think is going to be interesting for the future of customer experience. But I must say a chat that I don't think it will ever take away in terms of the more complicating quaries going through the human element. Yeah, let's put its great, we're not we're not there yet. Not they yet, definitely not they yet. But the certainly the transactional stuff, the more interactive stuff, is coming and is being developed. But I think, certainly my money is on the table, at least in my lifetime, that they will be still agents and specialized customer service agents to deal with the complexities of giving the customer the right answers as well as a great customer experience. But there's so much more out there that's been developed now, which is absolutely fantastic, very very interesting times for us. Has compared to the S and s and my first happen to the industry. So much has changed since the ninety is without an all right. So let's Change Direction here a little bit. We ask all of our gats kind of to standard questions towards the end of each inner review. The first is simply, as a revenue executive yourself, that makes you a...

...prospect for sales professionals and I'm always curious. People are always trying to get ahold of or earn the right to talk to prospects, and I'm curious if there's no relationship. Somebody doesn't have a relationship with you, but they believe leave there is an opportunity for them to provide something of value to your organization. What have you found to be the most effective with you in terms of capturing your attention and earning the right to say a fifteen minute conversation? I think the individual. Definitely. I am more of a face to face person. So when I meet the individual and we have a connection, the individual is saying things that I've shot in succinct and they have understood my business before coming to see me or talk to me and they talking things that are relevant. I think that's certainly in the first fifteen minutes of my conversation with fendors and salespeople will capture my attention. So it's about the individual, about the speech, about the relevance of the speech and then it's about the connection. Perfect. Okay, so last question. We call it our acceleration in sight. There's one thing you could tell sales, marketing or professional service people, one piece of advice that, if they listened to you, believe would help them achieve their goals, crush your quarters, be more effective. What would that be and why so? Do Your homework, understand the organization and what is the approach that you want to take with that organization from a selling perspective, I think be genuine, be honest and create a lasting a lasting impression. I think that's going to be key, because whether that person purchases something from you today or not, it's a different thing. But if you leave a lasting impression, that person will always remember you and will somehow reconnect with you and hopefully be a big customer. Excellent, perfect. I appreciate the...

INSAY. Certainder, I can't thank you enough for taking the time of on the show. It's an absolute pleasure to have you on today. It's been a pleasure as well chance. So thank you for making this very, very easy for first podcast for me. Excellent. And if people would like to talk to you more about the topics we've talked about today, what's the easiest way to get ahold of you? I think the easiest we would be linkedin would be one way to get much initially and then we could take the discussion on to email or form from there. Excellent. Will thank you again for the time. Has Been An absolute pleasure. Thank you very much, chat and you have a good evening. All right, everybody that does it. For this episode, check us out of BB REV exactcom show, the episode of friends, families, Co workers. You know the trill. If you like, what you here do is favorite leavis a review on itunes and until next time. We value selling associates with you will nothing but the greatest success. You've been listening to the BB revenue executive experience. To ensure that you never miss an episode, subscribe to the show on Itunes or your favorite podcast player. Thank you so much for listening. Until next time,.

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