The B2B Revenue Executive Experience
The B2B Revenue Executive Experience

Episode · 1 year ago

How To Break Down Silos In SaaS Companies w/ Jason Reichl

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Silos are naturally created within every organization as that organization grows.

 

When companies don’t understand how to deal with organizational growth in a healthy way, they protect the things that occur naturally. 

 

So they settle for silos, even though silos hurt their revenue. 

 

To find out how to break down silos, I sat down with Jason Reichl, CEO of Go Nimbly, a revenue operations company helping SaaS companies as they naturally grow. 

We talked about: 

  • How silos are created and sustained 
  • How silos are hurting your customers and your revenue 
  • How organizations can break down silos through revenue operations

 

Hear more from Jason in episode 140 on The B2B Revenue Executive Experience.

 

Listen to this episode and more like it by subscribing to The B2B Revenue Executive Experience on Spotify or Apple Podcasts.

Gets imperative that technology companies, becauseI do believe Sass is the future of business, like one day will bethe same as banking institutions, that those companies learn how to actually become aproper business, of proper revenue team. You're listening to the BDB revenue executiveexperience, a podcast dedicated to helping the executives train their sales and marketing teamsto optimize growth. Whether you're looking for techniques and strategies or tools and resources, you've come to the right place. Let's accelerate your growth in three two, one. Welcome everyone to the BB revenue executive experience. I'm your host, chats innerson. Today we're talking about how to breakdown silos and SASS companies. Number one, why is it's so critical to do it? Understanding whyit's hurting your revenue. And the bigger question is, how do you evenget started? As these silos have a tendency to grow kind of organically,as an organization does, how do you even start to disassemble them and driveto a much more cohesive organizational approach? To help us, we have Jasonrecheld, CEO of go nimbly. The first revenue operations consultancy. Jason,thank you so much for taking time and welcome to the show. Awesome.Thanks for having me chat. I'm very happy to be here. So beforewe jump into the topic of the day, we always like to start with anice breaker and this is I don't know why this has been a it'sbeen a hot button topic from L League because we've all and stuck at home. So yeah, doing, doing a whole bunch of other things. Butcurious people that know you largely through work or just your professional persona, whatis something you're passionate about that those that really only know you through work maybe surprised to learn? Yeah, well, I think that that's a little bitof hard question for those I work with, because anyone that knows meand follows kind of the things I believe, and I believe in total integration ofself. I don't believe there's such thing as a work life balance orseparation. I believe that those things should...

...be completely aligned to find the mostfilment in your life. So I think that most people are not surprised whenthey find out things about me and in work. But I have always beena creative artist. I have toured in bands my whole life, done calmbe my whole life, just been very into the arts and I feel likethat makes me really good at running a distant business and understanding groups in away that is fundamentally intrinsic to me and I really value that side of mypersonality. And so I think what would be odd to people is when theycome see these things, how fleshed out like my being a band is,or might I stand up calmed be or my Improv people often ask me donot sleep, and the answer is I do sleep a little bit, butreally I try to do things that align and allow me to make progress andin my life, including work, and have them all be sort of emergenttogether. I'm a big fan and passion about design thinking and design the lifethat you want. So I think that's another thing that someone might be alittle surprised about. How intentional everything is that I do excellent. And sothe the bands in the comedy with these things that you picked up at ayoung age or came to later in life found a passion for. Yeah,I started playing in bands when I was sixteen or fifteen or sixteen and touringand just doing that all through my adolescence and still do that now. AsI got older, it was harder could find time to be in a bandwith other people. And so if people know anything about musicians is every musicianthinks that their comedian, every every comedian must be a musician. So Istarted doing improved and stand up as a supplement to just really this community,that form that I found them being in bands. Another thing that I'm reallypassionate about as a group punk rock and playing in bands and things like that. And so I have a very diy ethic about myself and I love buildingcommunities and being part of creative communities. That's awesome. So okay. Sothen, so we go from punk rock and comedy to revenue operations. HowA heckt that happened? Oh, I...

...think it's a pretty natural, uhHuh, natural thing. So one of the things that I got really interestedis, so I was a consultant and ran a large consulting team for oneof the sales forces sizes for many, many years. Had many people reportingto me. That was great. Learned all about revenue sales, you know, customer success, all that kind of stuff. But being in Silkin Valleyand based in San Francisco, I went and was the VP of product ata couple organizations and helped our organization become a Unicorn Company through my through broughtmy product leadership. And what I found, though, is even in the bestcompany, where you were valued at, you know, a billion dollars,the revenue team really didn't know how to sell the product and it reallywasn't operating like a business. And because of that, I had this ideathat, oh, I can probably teach Sass at ten and past technology companieshow to operate like little businesses be because I believe that we were moving intothis era, this new era of customer, which we can talk about in alittle bit. We're moving into a new era of a customer, but, more important, we're also moving into a new era of funding, whereI think that VC's are going to diversify their portfolio. They're going to stillgive out a hundred million dollars, but they're going to give it to tencompanies instead of one company. And because of that, I think it's imperativethat technology companies, because I do believe Sass is the future of business,like it one day will be the same as banking institutions that those companies learnhow to actually become a proper business, of proper revenue team. And sowhen we say revenue operations, because you hit a bunch of different areas,they're funding to selling that product, is there a concise, kind of easyto understand for for our audience definition? Yeah, you say absolute operations.What do you would exactly mean? Yeah, so I'm writing a book about thisnow and and there's two things that I say. There's the definition thatI tell my mom and then there is the professional definition. So we'll startwith the professional definition and I'll simple,...

...if I'll even simplify further for thoseof people who don't really, you know, understand the inner workings of, say, the business systems. Right, so in your business you have,in my opinion, two distinct fly wheels. You have a product side Your Business. They're making the widget and that is made up, if you're ina tech company, that's made up of programmers and product managers and people whowant to make sure that you have the margin or growth you need, andthat's called business. The business side of it, that's the product side,and they're usually driven by margin or growth. Right then you have this otherfly willcalled revenue, the revenue team, and those people should be driven byrevenue growth. And who is part of that revenue team? To me it'ssales, marketing, customer success. I call that your go to market team. They're the ones that are, you know, shaking the hands of thepeople. They're the ones that are interacting with people, even if it's bysending them an email, right, but they're they're directly interacting on a oneon one basis with your customer. And then you have the Yang to thatYang, which is revenue operations, which are sales operation, marketing operations andCustomer Sus operations merged into one generalist function that's about servicing the customer experience atscale for the revenue team, and they report to the CRO or CEO,if you have, you know, a cro and so that whole fly willbecomes your revenue team. So it's go to market and revenue operations become yourrevenue team. So that's the more nuance to you understand how these things function. Answer in the way described to my mom is, you know, ifyou think about actors and and you think about the people who are in thescene, that's your sales, marketing custoers to cuss people that you're going tomarket, and then behind the few scenes, the people who hold the boom micsand are directors and are the scriptwriters and are all these other elements.That's your revenue operations team. And so that that of, you know,helping people think of it as a movie set and right helps him understand whatrole those people are playing behind the scenes. And so I mean just in thatkind of division, right, the...

...people behind the scenes, the peoplein the scene. We're already starting to use language or analogies that have naturaldivision in them. Right, there's a natural division. So when we talkabout silos and business, it's not unusual, as most organizations out there, foreverybody to talk about customer experience but nobody to really know what the hellthat means or how to make it a reality except in their particular silos.So how do you go around and how do you help these organizations get ridof these naturally forming silos and get rid of the drag or on revenue wherethe negative impact that it can have a customer experience? Yeah, totally.Well, I think it's important to understand why styles get created. It istotally natural. You know, the Term Silo Syndrome, which is what weoften talk about, you know, comes from this guy named Phil who workedfor goodyear tires and his job was to drive around the country and find,try to unite all the good your tires. And if you know, remember thes and s goodyear tire, which was like in every small town andarea, that hundreds of hundreds of places, and regardless of what the corporation wanted, which was to streamline things and increase margin for everyone. And thesethings were not franchise, they were owned by good year tires. But whenhe went to these individual markets, none of them, all of them pushedback about becoming this entity and they all use these excuses of well, youdon't understand this market, you don't understand XYZ. And what he came upwith is really the for fundamentals of why stilos are created and they're they're createdwhen number of employees skyrockets. are good year tires was opening like a hundredhundred stores a year, essentially across America. So of course a number of employeesare going to shoot up, right the number of organizational units. Soeach of those stores were unit then there was regional units and then there wasall this kind of BUYAC bureaucracy that was being created from the structure itself.And then, because of tires and because of where these things were located,there was a high degree of specialization in each good year tire. So theyreally couldn't run as a single unit because everyone was specialized. And then,ultimately it was also how to do with incentives. They weren't all built onone incentive. And so he was driving...

...through Iowa and saw, you know, the grains of silo and came up with the Term Silo Syndrome. Isthat they were all protecting these natural these natural occurring things because the organization didn'tunderstand how to deal with essentially organizational growth and a healthy way, and hespent his entire career trying to solve that problem. He died early in theearly and I think we are now, with revenue operations, just at thecusp with technology and other things to actually break down these silos. And thenI think the catalyst for that is that the customers are demanding a different levelof experience from B tob which is very similar to what they've been getting inBTC and I can talk about that. But there is a catalyst of thecustomer to so it's not only about our internal issues, but it's about customerswanting a different kind of experience in the buying experience of their experiencing for business. So those are the sort of two things that I see. Yeah,and we've I mean we've kind of trained be to be. I mean anybodylives a BBC life. They have Amazon, they have Netflix, they have athey've been to Disney. They all have had these experiences that are completelyfocused on them. What they want, where they want it, how theywant when they want it. They take those expectations in to be tob butto deliver that type of complete experience from beginning to end the customer life cycle, whatever you want to call it. You can't have the silos or youend up creating friction points along the process. And so when you start to dothat, it drives organizations as a hey, I'm focused on customer experience, but there's a difference between that and a customer centric approach and I'm curiousto know kind of what's your perspective on the two and why do you seeorganizations kind of talk the talk but not walk the walk. Absolutely. Sojust to add to that a little bit. So what we found through our research, and we're doing it. Some we're doing we're moving into being arevenue operations company where, you know, we're building software out, we're doingresearch, where we are doing coaching, we still do consultancy for businesses.So we're moving across the gamma of what...

I would call revenue operations services andproducts. But one of the things that we're doing in our research is wefound that we are past this age of the informned buyer. Right, andso this is a thing that's been lulled since why? I don't know.The first time I heard it was at a conference and, like you know, the one thousand nine hundred and ninetynine or something. Right. So theidea that your buyer knows more about your product than the sales rep they're talkingto, because I've done research, is just complete horse shit. At thispoint, people are coming to your product because they want to buy it.They're coming with the intention to buy. Everyone at this point understands the Internet, they understand how to do their own research. So when they get toyour website and they interact with you. They are they want to buy you. Maybe sometimes in the bureaucracies that there exist and they have to maybe havetwo or three competitors put against each other, but everyone's been in the sale cyclewhere that person is saying, well, I really want you, but Ihave to do this to please my boss. Right, your ocracy ofsilos at work in itself. So what I've found is what ends up happeningis someone comes to in one of our customers, as Zendsk as an example. Send us is a huge customer service platform that's very popular for, youknow, doing ticketing, customer service work. People come there because they want tobuy Zend us. Right. What ends up happening, though, andyou called it friction, but it's worse, and that the customer experiences gaps,just total fall out from your processes. Internally, it feels like friction,to the customer it feels like gaps. And what we found is that customerswill reduce their long term commitment with you, their contract value, andyou'll eat away their political capital to the point where you're losing what they wouldhave given you. And we've done this to asking people like okay, wereyou sure you wanted to buy Zin this. Yes, after meeting one, Iwas sure I wanted to buy zen this. So why didn't you thendeployed across your entire organization? And then what emerges is these gaps erode thetrust, right, and so that is the key. And so what wesystematically found is, how do you identify those in a way that's scalable,right, and that's what revenue operators do,...

...is they understand what the gaps areand how to solve them, skilled with scalability. So we invented arevenue revenue operations metric called three VC, which takes your buying experience, anda buying experience is just how your customer buys you, and most be tobe enterprise sales. It's they talked to an str they get handed off toyou know, they see some marketing, they go to your website, theydownloads some stuff and st are, but reaches out to them nest yards andpasses that off to a sales rep, Celles up, takes them to somepoint some at some point implementation specialist gets brought in, so on, soon. So that's the process of one buying experience for a customer. Sayingenterprise ass what we do is we apply a three VC to it, whichis we look at the that sales data on volume, velocity, conversion andvalue. So that's three bees and one see. And what we found,mind, is we pit them against themselves, right, and so we can see, oh, from stage one, stage two in the last six months, your volume has been down, your customers are experiencing that, right,or your velocity is down, the customers are experiencing that, and we actuallylook at that. Historically, we also didn't take that because go nimbly hasthe largest data source of SASS based business is. Operationally, we manage overtwo billion dollars for our customers. What we then look at is industry too. So we then match that against how well are you doing in your industry? So we find that you have these gaps in certain buying experiences by doingthat analysis. Now, that's not your traditional SASS metrics. We don't careabout CAC because we are not we don't care about margin. All we careis about finding the gaps are going to increase revenue, right, and we'rehoping that the rest of Your Business and that other fly will knows what todo once we bring in the revenue. But, but, but our goalis to increase the revenue and once you put that up as a North Star, and I really do believe in giving everybody that go to market team,the sales marketing, a customer to success team and the Revenue Operas of teama number they must hit. So when we go into an engagement, isnot uncommon for us to say, Hey, don't think of as an Roi betthink of us as how are you going to have that million dollar targetfor your cells team and you're going to...

...get a million? You know,three hundred thousand off because of the operational changes that we're making. Got It? Okay, and so you said something. There's a bunks there that we couldhave into, but I'm the everybody has a number they could hit.So are you advocating commission based compensation for everybody on revops? Yes, yeah, I love it. Everyone should have some kind of base that they canmake a living off of. I think that sometimes sales base is too low, but I think that everyone should be incentivized either through a bonus structure orpure commission based on the the growth of the organization. I love it.I'm I am a huge proponent of that as well, and that definitely doeshelp start to break down silence. But are there are other ways that yougo about you know, because even even if you take a customer success marketingsales, the people on the stage, there's natural silos there, sometimes becausethe marketing people don't have the same type of comp sometimes because they don't understandwhat the sales people do. How do you go about breaking those down andusing this type of data to help you accomplish that? Yeah, so weso we're looking across the buying expense or we're not prioritizing sales. Right,we're using sales data to say so. As an example, often if youhave an issue in Stage one to stage two or stage two to stage three, it's usually a marking operation issue that's happening right. So you can youunderstand, by doing this work as a revenew operator, that you can lookat this data and infer. I am a big proponent and the software weare building allows you to go further back than this. Just the opportunity stagesto the entire customer experience right and start to look at data trends inside ofthat customer experience. But in order to get started revenue operations you just needyour opportunity data, because you'll find things that really make a big difference there. So that's the first place I say. The second thing that we do iswe come in and we start to build roadmap. So we we operatebusinesses like product companies. So we put everything up on a road map andwe say why it's there and why we're prioritizing it and what we're hoping toget out of it, and then we...

...actually monitor that. So, asan example, in the example I gave of Stage one stage two, ifwe saw that we had a low conversion issue and we decided to add somethingto do with our marketing attribution, that we're not we're not attributing the rightkind of attribution to these accounts and so then they're not getting flagged as readyfor a sales rept to work on. As a simple example, we maythen monitor that and go, okay, we've changed this, we did anoperational project here and now we're seeing the volume increase and the conversion rate stayedthe same or went up. Right. What we would then do over timeto say we'd think that there's a correlation, maybe not causation, but a correlationto this operational project that we did and this going up right, andso that bridge is the gap where then suddenly everyone starts to playing on thesame team, because everyone actually cares about that. So I don't believe necessarilyin giving each individual number and making them mini styles and themselves. I believein making that revenue team have a number right. And yes, you can. You have to figure out what department can drive what through attribution to othermethods, but ultimately everyone should play in the same game right and then.So it's a lot of work we do around just that kind of alignment.But the road map helps tremendously. No operations team a year and a halfago we started doing this work in the way that we do it now hadroad maps. Now, probably twenty five percent of SASS companies that we gointo have a road map for their operations team that is built on right now, expert experiential. I think I should probably pause and explain another concept that'spretty cool. Cord Revenue Operations based on their past experience. But they're usinga roadmap and what that tends to do is aligned people to the greater good. Right, and it's very important because the reason that style is one ofthe reasons that styles occur is because people lose sight of what's actually being accomplished, right. And the other thing that happens, and that we're big oneof them, is we go into organizations and we say, okay, thereare such things as there's let's imagine there's this holy grill of revenue impact,this thing where the teams are working well...

...together and we can impact revenue successfully. Well, then that might take a long time. So if you makea fundamental change to your businessward with restructuring your sales team, you may notsee the revenue impact of that operational decision for six months, let's say.So how do you know it's working them? And this is where we say,okay, there's a difference between the KPIS we've used before, which areVanity Kpis, and what we call revenue momentum. Kpis mean that we havecorrelated that this KPI we will result to dollars, right, and so wecan then make a smaller goal of saying, yes, revenue impact is kind ofthis high north star that we're after, but in the sky there are otherstars, right, that you use to find the North Star, andthose are what we call, you know, your revenue momentum, KPI. Allright, so when we do we talk about metrics, the vanity metricsversus the revenue. You know, momentum metrics help help break just one ortwo examples so the audience gets the difference. Yeah, so in Sass it's typicalthat doing a demo of your product, a human demo of your product,increases, especially in enterprise sales, increases the likelihood of a closed oneby seventy five percent. Right. So you could say that for each demowe do, that's like five dollars in the bank, right. And sowhat we try to do is do this conversion of behavior that drives daily,repetitive action within your go to market teams and we try to attribute like everytime we do that action it's like making ten bucks, right, and bydoing that what you're building is a behavioral set that will lead to true revenueimpact over time. But often it takes a long time to get to revenueimpact. And the example I get before was, you know, you wantto rearrange your sales team. You can rearrange your cells team, but it'sgoing to take them three to six months and real for you to see thatimpact of that, right, but if you have these Kpis that you candrive, you can see, okay, we are making progress, because Iknow that the more demos we do, the more that we're going to closedown the line. And that's how,...

...a way that you can bring theteam together. And what we find is by creating these revenue Kpis, italmost creates gammification of milestones. I hate the word gammification of something we usea lot in the you know, two thousand and ten era. Yeah,and it kind of just disappeared. But it creates a gamification of we're onthe same team, we're making the same movie. Yeah, it's it.And going back to the knowledge to they use before. Every actors trying toact their ass off, but the best actors are giving something of their scenepartners, right. And so ultimately what you're trying to accomplish is this ideathat there are these milestones that are beneficial to the entire revenue team and thateveryone can drive off them. One vanity metric that's very common is the mqltoes qll handoff volume, right, and what happens as sales, head ofsales goes to a marketing ops or mark. The head of marketing goes, wedon't have enough leads, and the what does the marketing as person alwayssay? Okay, I'll lower the scoring threshold so you get more leads.Well, that's the first identification that that's a vanity KPI that the marketing teamis set up in order to when the sales team doesn't hit their goal,say well, I gave you all the leads that we committed to. Right, and that is the definition of PSILO. Protecting right is like I don't wantto be tied to the failure of the sales team, so I'm goingto create this this handoff metric that is actually mean less, because as soonas someone tells me they want more volume for me, I'm just going totweat my numbers. In reality, if you really believe in some means theirscore. They're marketing, you know their lead score, as example. He'sreal and if you went to the head of sales and said are held headof marketing and set I will need more leads, they're going to go well, we'd find new sources because that's a real number that's tied to real revenuefor them. Right, right. So the quicker they are to abandon thatnumber, the more organizations can start to see, oh, that's a vanity, metrics right, the more you know, one thing I hate to say aboutsalespeople as a lot of time forecasting calls are all vanity, it's allit's all this like dog and pony show that has really nothing to do withyou know, how many times have we talked to a sales manager and theyget off the phone and you go well, that your pipeline looks really healthy andthey go it's not, it's not...

...at all. It's like okay,well, we don't really believe in this, so why are we investing all thistime and energy and something that we don't actually believe in is going tocreate revenue for us right and love it? Yeah, so that's our philosophy behindall of it and where this comes into and how you get to that. Customer experiences, and this is just real quick, a major part ofpeople to wrap their brain around is we've existed in and there's a pyramid ofhierarchy, if you will, in the first level of hierarchy of a businessoperationally is intuition based. Someone walks into a room of Celles rep says,I hate the sales force page without this is really hard on me. Asales force adment on the operation side goes, I can fix that for you.Boom, intuition right, there's something that's wrong, someone can fix it. We're moving forward. This is startup land, right. This is howall startups exist and operate. Then you get to experiential operations, and experientialoperations is when you hire someone from some company you admire with pretend you hirethem from linkedin. You bring them in and they go what Linkedin? Wedid? You know? We did this for lead scoring, or we didthis for, you know, stage gating and done ad and you say,okay, cool, that sounds great. You have the experience, we're goingto listen to you. But the upper echelon of all of this, it'scustomer gap operations, where you are finding the gaps that your customers experience inyour process and your operational as doing those and what you'll find is you stillcan rely on the experience and you could still rely on the tuition, becauseintuition, because people have great intuition and people have great experience, but you'llprioritize and push yourself to solve a problem when you focus on those two areasthat are is real but won't have the impact that you want for your business. Yeah, Gotcha, and I mean it really is more like I meanI remember back in the day when database applications were designed from the ground upin the user interface was put on it as an afterthought, right, andnow we designed from we designed, we designed applications for years to finally,well, most people did from the cup, from the user back. Now itfeels like we're getting a point where we're designing or optimizing businesses from thecustomer experience back rather than the product forward.

Absolutely, and that's why I meanmy practice is I brought what we've been doing in product management for thelast twenty five years. I'm bringing that to, you know, the operationsof businesses. Now. I love it. Awesome. All right, so let'schange direction here a little bit. We ask all of our guests tostandard questions the end of each interview has a CEO that makes you a prospectfor other people out there that are tracks get your attention. Always curious tounderstand if somebody doesn't have a refer will into your trusted way to get anintroduction what works best for you, for somebody to capture your attention and earnright to your calendar. Yeah, so here's what I don't like. Idon't like cleverness or wittiness because they're usually not clever or witty. So don'ttry to be overly in personal with me. Be Personal with me, actually bepersonal with me, like tell me why I should care in one sentenceabout what you have. And it can't be like don't you care about leads? A fucking course I care about least. Why do you I think you're goingto give me leads? Right, like, what about you versus everyoneelse is going that? You think that? And then to show me you understandmy business, if you message me and say you're in the high textspace, it's like yeah, me and thirtyzero other companies, why are youtalking to me? And so it's being personal. And there's this woman namedBeck Holland who is amazing, who does this. She flip my funnel.Is the name of her, her podcast and company, and she does greatwork around personalization at scale. And for every sales manager who says you can'tpersonalize because it takes too much time, I say okay, good luck asyou watch, especially in the age of Covid as, you wash your pipelinesdry up. So then tell me how much time you have. So Iwould tell everyone that be personal. Try to find I mean, for me, I'm, you know, public figure. I do these kind of things allthe time. You can find something that's going to relate to your productthat I've said. If you can do that, I'm going to listen.I'm going to at least least respond to...

...you and be like hey, Ialready have a solution for this, or Hey, I'm not in the marketfor this, or hey, you probably shouldn't be asking the CEO of anex million dollar company about what they do about their leads becauld. Guess what, that's not my decision. You should know that. I mean. So, like you know, those kind of things. I try to always bekind and respond to people because I know how hard that job is. ButI think it's about being personal and ultimately listening to the feedback that you're gettingthis on this thing where it's like hit one if you want this, hittwo if you want this. I'm like, why are you acting like you're arobot now right, like, leave that to robot software. Like Idon't need to hit nothing, I just won't respond to you and I'll letyour email. Yeah, I was love the ones like hey, you didn'trespond to my last email. Will No, no, shit, I didn't careabout it. Right, yeah, and if someone said, Hey,I sent you an email and you didn't give a fuck about it, I'dprobably like yeah, you're right, you're I'd probably respond to them and belike you're right. And then if they said, well, why didn't youcare about it? If they even just change the topic from trying to sellme their product to hey, give me some feedback about this, you're goingto get a conversation with Jason Rachel. So I think that's something that peopleshould should realize is there's always an opportunity for you to grow, even ifsomeone's not going to buy your product. Take that because most of these peoplethat company that they're working for is not going to be their career. Sotake the time to grow as a professional. Absolutely all right. Last question.We call it our acceleration in insight. One piece of advice, if youcan just give one piece of advice to sales, marketing, professional servicepeople, the people on the stage. One piece of advice that you thinkwe, if they listen to would help them achieve beat their targets. Whatwould it be and why? Yep, hundred percent of your customers that boughtyour product bought your product, and what I mean by that is the ideaof leads and prospects and growing your business through that is it's not a realthing anymore, right. So you need to refocus on your customers who havebought your product and work very hard on upsell cross and make your customer,your customer service or customers success team,...

...be a revenue driver for your business. You'll pick up somewhere between five and seven percent of your quota if youdo that right, and it's a huge deal. So invest in operations andinvest in customer success, because those customers that bought are a hundred percent ofpeople are going to buy more from you and you need to learn to leveragethem. Sales managers don't think like this until they're not. They're about tonot hit their quota. Right, desideration? Yeah, so instead let's think theother way around and then go hey, for us, the secret software oursuccess has been the people in our industry lead their job every two years, right, and so they brought us to every organization that they go to. So we have an infinite supply of new customers and we have a twoto four your tenure with the businesses that we work with. So we havegrown a hundred percent year over year, except for this year of covid becauseof that. So you need to understand what that is for your business.Right. What is what is the virality effect for Your Business and how canyou get into that? And Product Management? We call that the hook. Everyproduct needs a hook. So what is your, you know, yourdelivery hook for your sales team and for your go to market team, andhow can you exploit that? And it's not just getting more leads by goingto trade shows. That's nobody's Hook. That's like, you know, you'rejust fishing and hoping you catch something, but how do you make sure youcatch the right thing over and over and over again? Is what you shouldbe looking for it. And I think the other piece of ice I wouldgive to sales managers is become a Crro, but realize that their Oh stands for, you know, chief revenue officer, which really to me means that youhave to understand marketing, customer sess operations as well as you understand salesright. The value of a sales person becoming a crow is that you canteach us other department's urgency, but those other departments can teach you so muchabout maximizing value for customer, and so...

I think that's that's the piece ofadvice that I would give any want to accelerate themselves. I love it.I love it, Jason. If a listeners interested in talking more about thesetopics or there's some particular place you want us to go for them to live, to learn more, dive deeper on, go nimbly, where do you preferwe send them? Yeah, so you know you can always go gonimble. You have a very good blog about revenue operations. We only workwith sort of the enterprise be to be SASS companies are. Our pricing modelkind of makes us not able to work with everyone. So we put outcontent for everyone instead to really help with thought leadership. But more importantly inthat you know my fun number. I'm going to give it to everyone.Here's four one hundred and five six six nine, zero five four six.Again it's four five six sixty nine zero five four six. Text me yourquestions about revenue operations. Text me your questions about Your Business. I'm happyto help and I think that we are in the age of transformation very similarthat we went through from manufacturing to leane manufacturing or waterfall development to addile development. The businesses who get this revenue operations thing in the implement it will havea unfair competitive advantage for the next fifteen to twenty years. So get onit now. You know, Help Your Business Survive. Right now and wherewe are in our time and space, it's very important to come together asa community and help one another. I love it. I could not agreemore. Thank you so much for taking the time. Has Been An absolutepleasure to have a conversation with you today. Thank you, man. I reallyappreciate Chad. All right, everybody, you know the drill. It doesit for this episode be to be Rev exactcom share with friends, family, Co workers. If you're stuck at home, kids will love it too. Till next time. We have value something associates with you. Nothing butthe greatest success. You've been listening to the BB revenue executive experience. Toensure that you never miss an episode, subscribe to the show and Itunes oryour favorite podcast player. Thank you so much for listening. Until next time,.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (238)