The B2B Revenue Executive Experience
The B2B Revenue Executive Experience

Episode · 3 years ago

How Healthcare is Driving Thought Leadership Through Video w/ Jennifer Sparks

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

When thinking about a Vlog, healthcare might not be the first industry you think of. Jennifer Sparks, Director of MarCom at Clearwave, joins us to chat about how they are driving thought leadership through content creation.

There's a thrill and being able to punch through know that you're able to differentiate yourself in the market place. You're listening to the BDB revenue executive experience, a podcast dedicated to helping the executives train their sales and marketing teams to optimize growth. Whether you're looking for techniques and strategies or tools and resources, you've come to the right place. Let's accelerate your growth in three, two, one. Welcome everyone to the B Tob Revenue Executive Experience. I'm your host, Chad Sanderson. Today we're talking about how to drive thought leadership through content creation and marketing, how that impacts sales, how people need to do it to be affective. Today, to help us with that, we have Jennifer sparks, director of marketing communications for clear wave, a company focused on transforming the patient access and healthcare with self service registration and insurance eligibility solutions gender thank you for taking the time and welcome to show. Thank you chat. So let's start with the easy stuff. How about for our audience and overview of clear wave and your role there well? As you said, I oversee marketing and communications for clear wave. Corporation and at clear wave we are a national company headquartered in Atlanta, Georgia. We operate in forty four states. But clear wave is really transforming healthcare to better serve than needs of patients, and by that I mean we offer self service registration solutions via Chiosk or desktop or your mobile phone that allow patients to check in for appointments or they can pay for their appointments, verify their insurance seligibility, all automatically. We work with hospitals and health systems, position practices and specialty practices. So we plug into over nine hundred insurance companies across the country and we're currently integrated with over forty practice management systems. And so, for those of you not in healthcare, the practice management systems or the companies that manage the patients electronic health records. So all of this happens automatically. When somebody has is one of the healthcare provider has clear waves, they are able to have that appointment automatically created and the information is automatically updated if there's any change in their insurance and that gets flagged and when the person is making the appointment, suddenly it becomes a parent to WHO's ever making the appointment, whether it's the patients themselves or the the receptionist, that the provider is able to flag that change in the insurance and add them have they had a change in insurance, and makes up immediately updating information. But that also gets updated automatically. When they go in to check in for their appointment, they can scan their insurance card or in their driver's license and then automatically that in commission again gets updated if there's any changes. And this is really, really important because, as you know, people can't get services they need if their insurance is rejected, and so this is a very important part of the puzzle and it's something that we feel really, really good about that we're able to keep the providers and the insurance companies and the patient seamlessly connected well, and it's I mean it removes the friction from the patient care process. You have to worry about it when you get there. He's go in, focus on getting better, focus on interacting with the doctor, all of that friction, you know, of filling out the forms and Hey, way, his insurance isn't taking here, as we remove that. So it really house true focus on patient, doctor interaction and the quality of care such. That's correct. That's correct perfect. So now, in this amazing landscape of healthcare, which is, you know, changing all of the time, I'm kind of curious what makes you passionate about marketing, not only in the healthcare care landscape, but, let's be honest, marketing today is fairly chaotic. I would love to hear kind of what makes you passionate about it and what get you up every morning to come in and continue to fight the good fight. You know, the first reason I was going to be...

...a tagover from my parents first answer is that I'm particularly passionate about marketing clear wave, and that's because I know we're making a huge difference in people's lies. So average check INS across the country, regardless of specialty, you're taking about nineteen minutes and if you're an amber, topeda clinic or an emergency room, it can take a heck of a lot longer. But with clear way, an average check in is taking about three minutes at the kiosk and our mobile solution check INS are averaging under two minutes. So that's a massive time saving and and so we feel like that's something to be very excited about. Additionally, our clients are seeing, on average, so we're talking now about the hospitals and health systems, are seeing on average, and increase of anywhere from fifty to a hundred and fifty percent in point of service collections. So that's pretty huge, you know, in terms of return on investment, of feeling really good about what you're the specific products they're offering to your clients. So we know we're making the huge difference in the lives of our patients. We know we're in terms of their healthcare. We know we're making a huge difference in the lives of our providers because we know that they need to be able to get the collections covered because when people don't pay, you know, it's a problem to the doctors. So it's very easy to get excited about sharing that kind of success. But in terms of your second part be of your question about why am I passionate about marketing in general, I'm pretty passionate about it because it's actually for me there's a kind of a thrill in the competition, you know, there's a thrill in being able to punch through, know that you're able to differentiate yourself in the market. Place and know that you're you're reaching your intended target demographic. I guess I have a kind of a competitive spirit. So that's excellent. And as we were prepped for this, we focused on we talked a little bit about the importance of video, and so when we look at marketing day, we know video is showing up everywhere, with some of them good, some of them not so good. But I'd like to understand how you're using video in your marketing strategy, both to create brand awareness but also doing to drive that, you know, customer engagement. Where did that, that focus on video come from, and how has it been effective for you guys? Well, you're right, video is a huge part of what we do and you know, I say it was some sadness because I'm an avid reader, but frankly, I actually I don't believe people read much anymore, and so the old thing of picture is worth a thousand words is still very true. So so video really solves a lot of problems, because what I've discovered is that in a one to two minute video, three minutes tops, you can share the salient points that it would take you two, two three pages of a case study to accomplish. And you know, often even times in need the longer white paper. So this is why we watched our blog series the solutions guy, and each week our chief operating officer, Eric Anderson, covers a different healthcare topic and addresses how clear way that's helping solve the healthcare problem. And to be, you know, frank with you, it has been just wonderful journey that I have gone on with our chief operating officer so far. We launched this vacuum June and it's we've just had a ball with it and I guess you know, you probably take a look at a few of them yourself. So you tell me, how are we doing? I think they're I think they're great and actually, you know what it brings up. I think anybody, health care not I think anybody should check out that V log. I really think it is done well and I was actually just having a conversation yesterday with someone for another interview on the podcast. We were talking about production overhead of video and asset creation today right, and it doesn't I mean correctly if I'm wrong. It looks, I mean it looks amazing, sounds great, it's short, succinct, to the point and impactful, but once you get into the rhythm of creating that content is there isn't too much overhead. It's UN well, am I wrong about that? Now you are your one hundred percent correct. We do this very economically and you know, from my perspective, I have to...

...reveal my hand here, I couldn't do this without page Taylor, who is my partner in crime. She's our graphic designer and she is a the editor that works on these with me. I write the scripts, I shoot them and then she does you know, we sit down and we I. We talked about what it's going to put the finish products going to be like, and so we do it together and so it's posted it as a joint product behind her genius and and then obviously, big hat off to a big shout out to our chief operating office, are Arganderson, who's just frankly, made for TV. You know, it's really, really, really good come so he makes it very easy. So, you know, I write the script, I shoot it over to Eric, Eric and takes a look at it. But even before the script gets written there's a lot of give and take with our executive team and our sales team. But I'll talk more about that in a little later. I do think that my theater of films and television, documentary and news background is important because I look at every video we create as a storytelling opportunity. So we're always telling a story about clear wave and whether we're sharing a story about the results so we get or the importance of mobile as a patient access solution or why a purchase of clear wave requires sophisticated change management as much to tech savvy, at the end of the day we have to have a clear beginning, mill and end and we need to know what is the call to action for the viewer. And it's really that simple. So you know, the data is very important because we do have a lot of amazing data to share and I believe the data for any markers listening to this, you know that data is your credibility. Without that data, I mean you're just it's just words. So so this this is a business after all. Bottom lines are very important. So anytime I can punch some statistics, I'm always going to do that. Well and there. But you know, as you said when we were prepping, there's a fine line between too much data, which which can build credibility but also has the potential of maybe boring people or turning them off. And that narrative, and I'm glad you mentioned it, because I was going to I was going to go there. You do have a background in filmmaking and you have MFA and for anybody who's not creative, I actually had was an English major in my Undergrad I understand what that means to great extent and sad that I never got one. But we won't turn this into a therapy session about me. You have, you have an amazing background to do this and the ability that you guys have executed in terms of taking narrative and data and putting it together in a compelling manner. I think other people can really learn from that, because I see too many videos that are don't even talk about video quality. Let's just talk about the narrative itself. You lose me in thirty seconds. Yeah, you know, and again it really comes down to always being really clear about what's the story we're selling and coming again as as from the old. You know, having had that, I work for a while for NBC affiliate in New Mexico, so I do understand. You know, when you have a limited amount of time. You really got to get to the point. The same time, I always think of it in my mind as like a series of postcards and if I was going to have to tell a story with postcards and I would have to grab, you know, maybe five post cards to tell my story, what would the picture be on the post card and what would be the words on the back of Post Card to tell my story? And that's kind of how I explain it to people when I'm thinking about home on and it's you know, it's like story boards, right. So I'm just thinking about what's first, what's middle, what's next, what's next, what's next, and I try to I try to organize it along those lines so that it's really a story that has a beginning from middle pen and in perfect so video becomes one of the primary content creation activities. I'm curious when you...

...think about her, define kind of the channels that you're going out with your marketing efforts. A thought leadership versus customer engagement? Do you think about them both simultaneously as you create those videos, or do you instead think about, I need the best story I can get and here's how I'm going to leverage it? In each of those channels. I wish I can say with that statisticated I guess I could. I mean the reality is I write our thought leadership prest pieces. I drafted all our press releases. I definitely work with our sales team and our executive team coming up with topics. We also have an agency that assists us with lead nurture and lead Gen but when it comes down to the actual sort of ticking up topics and doing the the scripts themselves, I try to keep a balance between you know, if we've done topics that, for are a couple that I see. If I feel like we've done too many in a row that are very customer oriented, then I'll try to do one that's a little bit more water about thought leaderships within the industry. But it's want more art and science, I think. Well, I love it. I love it because, you know, I have a lot of people that be like, Oh, well, I do this and I do this into this and then it will tell me how effective it was. Well, I don't know. I'm a firm believer that the art and science, the blend of art and science, is where the power, where the magic happens right and so I'm glad you say that, and so when I one more thing I want to add on that, though, is that you know, we frequently have guessed from various departments within clear waves that Eric will want to make sure that we're sharing the different aspects of what we do here at clear waves and the incredible team that we have, because you know, obviously we're all biased, but but we really are proud to share the fantastic culture that we have here at clear waves and we really care about our customers and and so again, you know, I think it comes through. I think as you meet these different team members, you see the diversity of our team here at crew wave and and you see the we have very good, well developed from of humor here at clear wave, and I think that comes O. Tech comes through as well. So you know, we try to balance what we're doing in terms of our company. Of objectives are sales objectives, but I also think we also really try to make sure that our brand comes across as young, as intelligent and as having a good sense of humor about who we are, and I think that comes across in the video. So that's something we certainly shrine. For well, I humor is such an incredibly important part of reach out connecting to other human being. So it is effectively done for and again, I guys audience listening, go check them out. They're amazing examples of what's possible. But you mentioned something I want to dig into a little bit deeper, working with the sales team. So I'm curious with the thought leadership in the videos and the content creation and that strategy, how do you ensure alignment with the sales process to provide, you know, the right content at the right time to move people through the funnel? Well, it's just that you ask that because I'm aware that it's pretty well known that often sales and marketing are and as aligned as people are like not. I know, shocker, but actually we are and I think the reason that we are is obviously I work very, very closely with our chief for Revenue Officer Shaun Priest, who is amazing, truly amazing, amazing individual. You've never met a more positive and encouraging human being on the planet and just an all around incredible leader than Sean priests. So it sounds Corny, but Seawan just is very aware of what is happening and we have obviously, like many other organization sales meetings and you know, I try to pay close attention...

...to what I'm seeing trending from the data that I'm seeing and what's happening. So, just an example, if I see a whole bunch of a certain specialty area in the funnel, right, you know that I'm going to put my particular hat on and think about what can I do from a video perspective to support what I'm hearing is needed. So I pay attention. But I also have a great partner who says you do want about such and touch you know. So we work closely and I guarantee you the topics are not HAP hazardly chosen. So I won't reveal any trade seekers, but I will tell you that there's plenty of rationale belonging each and every solution s guy topic that's chosen, of why it's being chosen and what it relates to in terms of deals. You had on a really important point, that collaboration. Right. You know, I don't want to give away my age, but let's just say if I had, it would be blong. And and so you know I grew up, I started my career marketing and then moved into sales and for a long time there was there was that cliched, stereotypical friction between sales and marketing. But today, at the speed that we move and how much data is accessible for people, without that collaboration, I think organizations miss the marks and so I think you guys having the ability to partner that way is extremely powerful, not only for where you are today, but we're clear wave will go in the future. Well, I one hundred percent agree, and you know, Shan and I joined the organization at the exact same time, so basically we both became full time employee that clear wave. Right, it's the beginning of June and you know, I'm proud to tell you that we've added twenty new logos to twenty eight five June. So we know we had to doing something right. Yeah, Yeh. So help us understand how those teams are structured. Is there, you know, how many on the marketing team with the Sales Worg look like? At the partnership at the executive level is critical, but then there's you know, there was also the field in the execution. So how do you guys structure those to make sure they're they align well and play well in the sandbox together. Well, first of all, we have a very, very talented sales team and it's a hybrid of territories and specialty areas. We're still pretty nimble. We're pretty scrappy start up, you know, I think we were. While I say that, you know, we have some specialty area folks. We also, you know, people will jump in as needed. So the architect of all that is our chief revenue officer, Sean Priest. You know, he decides how the sales territories are allotted and so forth. so that's really his domain and I don't get involved in that. I just, you know, basically bowed to the master. But but our marketing department, I can tell you, is pretty small and and you know, we have a very talented graphic designers, film editor that I already mentioned, pitch tailor that I work with, and they'll have a wonderful coordinator, Brandis trainger, as well as our brand new Uga Grad interning with US making shot. So we have it's really just us and but that, you know, that's how we're structured and so we're really proud of the work that we're able to do with our team. Small, but mighty small, but mighty. You're getting a lot done with a very small crew, and so should be, as we recognized and applauded. I'm curious, as the director, I was the organization measuring you for success, what are the metrics that you're targeting towards? matrics? Yes, by numbers, we look at we will get quality, by leads, we will get share a voice, Wi look at domain authority and of course we look at conversions and closes sales. So, at the end of the day, or sales up or the down? Do we hit our sales targets? Did we feed them? Marketing can't really take all the credit or all of the blame, but we are absolutely part of the tale of the sale and what I affectionately refer to as the tale of the sale, right. I mean, so we can't, we cannot ignore if we're not giving the sales people the materials...

...they need. And of course, now that you know, we're finding people are entering a funnel a little bit more educated than they were right. So we need to be really, really good about making sure that we're providing in depth materials to answer more specific questions and queries that are going to come up, because these people are not. It's not just all, you know, vague awareness. When they come to us. They got they've already done their research. So we've got to be ready to anticipate the tough questions. We've got to be ready to have the data, provide the case studies. Have many case studies. You know, make sure your two studies are not, you know, three year old, four years old. You know, he beat up to be really timely and do the work, because it's just now fair to that sales person right who's sitting there in the person says, well, this is great, but this is four years old. What's going on now? You know, we need to be we need to we need to go to to provide them what they need. Okay, excellent, sir. To make sure you're, you know, generating those mql's and getting that share of voice and conversions. You guys really have to ensure that you've got solutions to you know, being timely and making sure that you're prepared to answer any question that comes to the door. That's the beauty of the well informed buy are these days. You really never know what's going to come next, and so I'm curious how how are you guys handling that when you look at optimal solution or structure the team or ways that you do that to be timely and prepared and answer the tough questions. So what's you know? What's that solutions that look like on your end? Well, I think like every marketer out there, we're struggling with ensuring it or reaching our charget audience in a very crowded market place. We know we have to be creative to stand out. So you've aren't we've already talked a lot about video. We believe that we stand out because our video and so we use it a lot. We know that email is a fact of life, but we also know that, you know, a wail of a lot of email will never be open. So to reach the decisionmakers, we know we have to use a multi pronged approach that includes paid, arn social and owns. You know, and it's sounds so easy when you just rabble a lot, but you know, but you know, but then actually living it out and making sure that those columns are aligned and that you're really doing what you need to do for each one of your verticles if you have a complex business model like we do, or we're doing more than one thing, kind of making sure that you are appropriately a lotting enough energy to each product that you offer and at the same time using a variety of platforms, not letting one thing dominate. I think it's really important that integrated marching plans are very, very important, and I just can't say that enough. And if you if you look about what you're doing and you notice you've been doing your one thing heavily and you're not getting the results that you want, then you know, that's really a good moment to say will maybe out of been doing something different, you know, and I really I just switch it up. I switch it up frequently. Maybe maybe dat H I don't know, but you know, you just have to switch it up. You have to well, change the name of the game, right if you know people's attention spans are getting so short these days, if you don't pay attention to what's resonating and what's not, or what people are talking about or questions that they're asking or things like that, if you're not in a position to be, I call it, flexible but consistently comfortable with change. Not sure marketing or even sales these days as a job where you're going to want to be sitting too long. Right. It's just the nature of the beast one. And I would add that, you know, we pay very, very close attention to data. The solutions are really in plain sight. But you have to be diligent about looking at the data and make David data driven decisions. And especially when you're a smaller company like we are, I mean you just can't afford to do everything you want to do right. So, you know, I get the lecture probably more than I more than...

I should be. It would probably the move me to just stop asking for stuff. But you know we can't buy all the candy that we want, you know, but I you know, I keep asking anyway. But you get the point. You you got to be you've got to think carefully about how you're going to apply the limited resources and do it smartly. In the data will tell you. The data will tell you what work without a doubt. All right, so let's change the direction a little bit here. I ask all of our guests kind of too standard questions towards the end of each interview. The versus simply as a director of marketing communication that make sure, revenue executive, which means you're also a prospect for sales professionals. So I'm always curious to hear if you don't have a relationship with somebody, if there's not a referral in, what is it when somebody approaches you that captures your interest, builds credibility and inspires you to spend fifteen minutes with them when you don't know who they are? That's pretty easy. You know. I prefer a no nonsense approach, you know, cut to the chase. Let me know what you can on for me and at what price. It's just not very helpful for me when somebody wants to ask me if you know what they've been meeting. Happens on a Friday. You know it's a pet peeve of mind. Just don't ask me. Did I do you know my doing something fun over the weekend, one of Your Business over the weekend? You know we haven't gotten to that point this relationship yet. You so. I mean, I just can't heard it when you have give people there her like, let me builds a relationship. Could do and they don't build a relationship with me. Just to tell me what it is you're drawing dogerment and I'll let you know that's something I need so you know I'm you as that's fair. No, that's fair and I think it's great. Right, and I've experienced the same thing. I won't name the company, but I've got a wrap who is, I want to say, hounding me and every time I leaves you a voicemailar sends me an email or accidentally catches me. Because, I do say accidentally, I haven't put his contact like in my phone, so I still didn't hands of the phone. It's always about something else. It's always about, hey, I just got back from the shore this weekend. What good for you? I was raking right, like, come on, like, what do you what is it you want? Like, and I think that's important. It's very important for people to understand the beginning of any business interaction that candor and straight to the point is respectful. It is respectful of where you are in terms of, quote unquote, relationship with that individual. You haven't earned the right to ask those other questions yet, and it comes across feeling a little like do you really give a crap what I'm doing this weekend? But you really don't, and I know you don't, so don't ask. Sorry, that's a button for me too, so I just kind of got up on the soapbox. They're sorry about that, so I'm no, I'm glad. We're all we're all in a bring it. Oh yeah, without a doubts. All right. So last question. We call it our acceleration inside. There's one thing you could tell marketing individuals, one piece of advice that, if they listened, you believe would help them crush their targets. What would it be and why? Well, on a marketing podcast, when I'm the BOS that say it's probably sacrilege, but I am a huge believer in pr we can run at and create compelling content all day long. But remember the second part of my title. It's marketing in communications. So in the long run, I believe that it's not what we say about ourselves, but it's what others say about it. CEP really matters. So I think when our clients put out specially to or speak at national conferences, sharing your success with clear way, that is the best advertising possible. So that's my final we're here. Is Always go back to your customers. They will be the best possible advertiser for you. Perfect perfect generate for listeners interested talking more about things. We touched on today or learning more about clear way. What's the best place for them to go next? I to just that they email me, Jay sparksit clearwavingcom. That would be just fine. Or they can call my desk. Seven seven, zero, sevenhundred and seventy one, five, three, four eight. Okay, guys, she gave...

...you the number, but be really to the point, like she just gave it you right there. Don't call it and ask her our weekend is going to be calling and tell her what tell her what it is you offer her in exchange for her insight and expertise. Jeff, I can't thank you enough for taking the time to day. Has Been Great having you on the show. Thanks, Chad spend. My pleasures see with you today. All right, everybody that does it for this episode checks out of bb Rev exactcom. Share the episode with friends, Family Co workers. Please write us a review on itunes if you like what you're hearing in until next time, we have value selling associates, which you all nothing but the greatest success. You've been listening to the BB revenue executive experience. To ensure that you never miss an episode, subscribe to the show and Itunes or your favorite podcast player. Thank you so much for listening. Until next time,.

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