The B2B Revenue Executive Experience
The B2B Revenue Executive Experience

Episode · 3 years ago

"How AI Recruiting Can Create a Better Culture with Vijay Sundaram"

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

“Culture eats strategy for breakfast,” warned management icon Peter Drucker.

Recruiting people who fit in with your corporate culture is mission critical.

What if you could use the same AI marketing techniques that find qualified leads for your sales team to find recruits who share your company’s culture?

From an AI perspective, the recruiting process parallels the sales process. Both are about looking at behavior to winnow down many potential leads to decide who is the most convertible candidate for the long term.

That’s what Zoho.com is doing, according to Vijay Sundaram, Zoho’s Chief Strategy Officer.

 

 


You're listening to the BDB revenue executive experience, a podcast dedicated to helping executives train their sales and marketing teams to optimize growth. Whether you're looking for techniques and strategies, were tools and resources, you've come to the right place. Let's accelerate your growth in three, two, one. Welcome everyone to the B Tob Revenue Executive Experience. I'm your host, Chad Sanderson. The majority of us have accepted jobs with companies we thought were going to be a fit, only to found out later not so much. Most of us are also extremely aware the rise of artificial intelligence. Yet what happens when the two cross paths, when ai is using the recruiting process to identify optimal fit, and how does it impact the growing and care of culture? Each area can impact company Strategy Direction. Make up and explore this topic. Today we're talking with VJ Sunder Room, chief strategy officer for Zoho. Vj, thank you so much for taking the time to be on the show. Thank you for having each at okay, so, before we jump into the topic, we always like to start with a question to kind of give our guests a little bit more insight into who you are as a person, and so we like to start with you know something that you're passionate about, maybe a hobby or a pastime that you have that people that know you from a business standpoint might be a little bit surprised to learn about. Let's a good day to stop that. Well, I order and write a motorcycle. I would call it more of past and than than a complete passion. And apart from giving your chance to be out of the open doing just by myself, it also allows me to skinker around with it and tick up my poteen year old daughter and fix things right. And what comp may ask what kind of motorcycle you have. It's actually it's a cruise that it's a Honda. It's not a very big bike. It's it's a street bike and it just I use it to get around town and I phone on the weekend excellently. I myself from a passionate Harley rider and have plans to do a two week trip through yellowstone this summer. So anytime someone says motorcycles are getting something in common yet yeah, so all right. So, for our listeners, I'm familiar with Zoho. It's a brand that I've known for a long time, but some of our listeners may not be as much. I was hoping you just give us kind of an overview of Zoho the company in your role. They're sure when most of the most people think of so what they've probably heard of the crm product that we provide. We indeed offered a very competitive see atom system, but that's actually only a part of what we do, and so home bi business software in multiplaiting well, starting from sales. That, of course, crm is uplightsh a product. We also built products off there products in the Eddas of marketing, customer support, HR people, Management, finance, accounting, and have not even reached the end of the list. If we also have a I know we also have a cloud office suite, much like Microsoft and Google, and a lot of products with the and collaboration APPs. In a sense we've taken the bank very different from most of the company, which tend to build a product up to on focus on it. We've taken the Lat of twenty years to go up and build a very, very broad slot of products, and more than forty at this count. If I would have summarized it, focuses to basically enable a company to run its entire business on the cloud, using just the whole APPs and interacting with other APPS that they want. In fact, this is something we do ourselves. Our Room Company, Zho, with more than Sevenzero employees, runs entirely on the zoo APPs, over forty products. That's a big that's a big number for any company to have in their stable. There's also Zoho University. Yeah, and so I'm curious...

...just a little bit. Can Give us a little bit on Zoho University? Where that came from? How? What was the genesis behind that? Yeah, so university is about a dozen years old now. You know, it's clearly came about from a set of corporate conviction that evolved it soo and practicing what we preach. So some of our convictions come from actually a rejection of widely accepted norms around people, development and and I'll just point out to a few tenant to to clatify that. The first part of it that I point out is we definitely have a strong antique credentialist bench. Well, that means is, as a company, we don't look at degrees or university pedigree or marks that people were on this lead. To conclude, how successful, they will be in left. So that's one aspect of it. So we therefore have to involve a method that works for us and hiring and recruiting people. The second thing is we also come from the belief that companies and organizations must take an active role in our society to develop the people. They shouldn't wait for educational institutions and somebody else to do this and hand it over to them. So that's part of the reason why we went down this part on. And finally, a point out the one more thing. We a lot of times people talk of about our talent. You know, the the price for talent, especially when I come from a silicon vallet. Talent is under your nose, you know. You just have to find it and develop its rather than advocative job to somebody else. So that's how we actually got parted with those university we went to fix some young kids. We pick them up at the high school level and build them out into people who could productively work in society and without having a college degree, and we've been fairly successful at it so far. Actually, it's a different person, factive, right, it said, different bents. When you know, I we hear that all the time, oh, I don't have enough people to fill these jobs, and and that taking the time to identify the right individuals to invest in. That's a powerful shift, one. That's that apparently has paid off great dividends for Zoho. Yes, it definitely has. So, fule, yeah, excellent. All right. So let's jump into the topic of the and this is all really kind of leads right into it. You know, contact points between employee engagement, AI and recruiting in the delicate balance of culture. Now I've read some of the articles you wrote at the end of last year on these topics and I want to explore a little bit more how these things intersect. So let's start with Ai. R It's kind of a buzz word right now, but in the recruiting process and hiring funnel, the start of the employee experience, how would you recommend people be leveraging ai effectively? See, I have got a lot of focus in the business build. Of course it's got made much more noise in the consumer world, but if you look at the business world, a lot of it doesn't focused around marketing, sales processes, prospecting, website optimization, things like that, and at let's focus has gone into into the recruiting side of it. But let me lend you a perspective here. You know, if you think about the recruiting process, it pretty much parallel. It's very much in parallel to a sale process. So in the sales process you actually prospect for customers, you know, you look and generate leads and then you go and acquire those needs and convert them into customers, which is the selling process, and then you try and retain these these customers with you as long as you can. And if you think about it, the recruitment process for people, as on camera, is similar. You actually do the same things. You prospect there too. You're looking for somebody that that you want to find. You want to find the right kind of people and you want to qualify them, much like what you do in sales, and then you want to try and higher them and make sure that you are a company that's attractive and meets there they needs them aspirations and and then...

...you want to retain them for the long term. So in a sense, a lot of the air techniques and methods that were applied and owned in the process of customer acquisition can be applied into the process of talent acquisition. So you look for the right Pitt in the prospecting stage and you know, if you look at how identification of talent works today, is still fairly cool. You know, you still look and resumes and keywords to establish who you think of the right qualification pedigree, as I mentioned earlier, and then you try and bringing these people's point of views and apply some sort of fit in an interviewing stage, which is always subjective. So one of the things that you could say is why don't we take the air process of finding the kinds of customers we want and apply to people? And so you start to look at things like how do they the same things you do for Thele didn't do with the candidate. How how did they connect with you? They come and meet you at an event in it? Did they actually come and learn more about you? What are something they've done outside of their work, because today you people society feeling to connective even find a lot of this stuff. And then, once you've got these people in, you applied the same techniques that that you've done in the sales process that we came to find the right opportunities from the company to help them migrate to other places in the event they're not happy with what they're doing, and so on. So I don't see this as a departure. I think this is an application of a similar process and my idea excellent. It is a very you know now that you say that it is the light bulbs going off. It is extremely similar. The question I guess I would have is in the challenge becomes how I instruct my ai to evaluate these candidates, like the behaviors that I want to see from them or or the types of things. If I'm extending this correctly, and please correct me if I'm wrong, it's almost based on those things that you focus on, our have the AI focus on our look for. Also, I would think, starts to lend the kind of the first steps of making sure that the individual fits the culture, because you're going to ask for those things that are going to hopefully enhance the organization as a whole. So even by the very questions that you're asking the AI to go financers to, you're already starting to spell the recipe for what is a successful addition to the cultural soup. You're absolutely a big GUB and and it doesn't mean you are now giving away somewhatomtant this idea of figuring out whose right to your company. I mean, you do the things that you would like to do. You'd like to know somebody is interested in you. What if they learned about you? Do they look up to have they read about your start? How much time have they spent with your market offering or your products? Have they tried to learn your culture? These are some of the things you can instruct the system to look and look for in their engagement if you prior to an interview process, so you get a sense of how people interested in both they in looking for and and in a sense it is different from a process where people are treated as maybe more like more like resources, where you just put them through a process where you look at resume, if you look at keywords and then you have weedoffs and various stages without getting a larger picture of what the person's about. When you work with companies and see companies do this, how do you help them understand that the very nature of the things they ask the AI to look for will also determine part of the outcome, because it's a sun I mean again, it's subtle and if you really spend the time to think about it, it kind of becomes a little bit obvious. But, but, but not a lot of people have a lot of time to sit around and stare out the window. So, yeah, how do you help them understand that connection? See, at this stage, right it's hard to change somebody is recruiting practice all together. In a people have developed approaches built up over time,...

...right where they actually look for certain qualifications, keyboard and so on. So, in a stance, the way to work this thing is to provide it as a way to augment what they already do. You looking for these types of inputs and maybe that makes sense for your type of organization. They may not make sense for an organization like Zog, but maybe it makes sense for you. Here's some other things we can look for. Here's some other things where you can find a person's interest, whatever they for, what other things they've contributed for, contributed to words and and things that they have participated in the past. It allows you to look put things beyond just the keyword that reduce that put the filtering process in place, presumably getting it getting you to as a person who is more adaptable and right for your business. If you know, if I can let me stop them. Oh No, I feel like there was something that was a big nugget rate to keep going. You know, I was I was reminded of when, you know, Peter Drucker once famously said right, culture is strategy for breakfast. And if you you know, when you think of hiding people, you think of your company, your strategy, how they fit into that. Often Times you lose sight of the fact that your company actually embody some sort of culture. And how do these people fit into the culture of that recruiting effort? And all companies will agree that some of these elements are important to be successful of that company. It's just that they don't actually look out for it at the front end of the process and, like I was saying earlier, they kind of try and read this out or tease it out some on it in doing an interview process. And and I think as these is systems developed, would probably see some out of the trace being able to be descipherable at the front rather than in the middle of the back in the process. Got It, got it, and I mean it is it becomes the embodiment of the questions we ask say a lot about who we are as individuals. As well as the organization's right. And I think people have a tendency to often spend too much time at the microlow because their focus on putting out fires rather than really take a step back figure out what are some of the good questions you can ask even in the recruiting process. And so okay, so that's one application of AI. Are there other ways that you're seeing kind of don't want to say outside the box, right, because once you want to explain it it's really not that odd. But other things that you've seen from an AI standpoint that have really kind of impressed you? Or maybe the Zoho's doing the other people haven't thought of that you're comfortable sharing? Okay, are you still talking about on the aspect of recruitment, or ai in general, applicable to babies's aspects of business, ai in general, tactics of business? Okay, okay, sure, you know. The way to think about Ai is to have some concept of what you actually trying to do with the AI. So then it gives you are larger framework and then you decide what you're building under that framework. Right. Other ways you start justifying all these techniques and capabilities and it may miss the picture. So here's how, sure, just how I would think about it and how we look at it in some of the in when we deploy this with no products. What are we trying to do with this? I'll pick three or four examples. One thing we're trying to do is we want to use AI to me, to improve the nature of which improve work. So one of them is to avoid what I would calls avoid the Monday. A lot of our jobs, use, in mine included, involves doing stuff every day that's kind of boarding and TV. Now people he could get some fancy as system right, so sit down and and take over that job. WE BE DEL to. Nobody would talk about it. I just place in you because it's taking way that some we don't want to do anyway. So that's one example. I give some examples of this, and in business. So that's one fundamental purpose. Another fundamental purpose is allow ai to take over things that humans actually do badly. So working with enormous amounts of dasia...

...and trying to find patterns, and then it's a classic thing that humans will fumble and fail on and never admit it, you know, and this is something a machine can do perfectly well. So that's another example. So that would be another directional focus for what you do here. Coralary to that is to allow people to focus on where they can actually add value, like in making decisions or in applying judgments. So that would be a third type of alien. And leave you with the last which is because Ai, especially in the context of machine learning, can look at vast patterns of data, look at prior patterns of data, it is in a unique position to perhaps actually predict and propose, to be able to say how something should be done or give you a wanting or something, or maybe proposed that some direction could be taken. Again, this is another thing that would actually be made to anyone rather than be seen as a tress, because it allows them to actually perform better. If you lives the sprainwork of four or five or major intense then you can see how you rule this into business APP so take some example sale. So if you take a something like sales, Monday in work, you know it's need comes in all sales and marketing guy to do the same thing. They get the lead, they respond to it in the within wherever twelve hours, and then that first week they send a reminder. The loggett into the CRM. They have some follow up act in except rate. That's all right. So this is boring stuff. If you're getting thousands of lead who wants to do this? Let's The a I doing for you. So that's a example of avoiding them. One dated sales. I'll give you an example of something. And these actual examples of things that the WHO have done in some of the products analytics. So we have an analytics to business intelligence product and people think of analytics mostly in as pretty pictures and graphs and so on. The interesting thing I find with analytic as if it can tell you something about what you should do or should not do. You know, I like in this to a set of events. So let's say a lot of running logistics operation and you have all this information coming at you. I would love for my hand with my analytics system, instead of just drawing all these beautiful graphs and charts that look good on boardroom presentations, to just put everything into a red into three categories red lights, orange rights and green lights. So when I come in in the morning I just look at the Red Light Events and it tells me these are the things I need to take care of and I'm allergistics, let's say, allergist six, coordinator or dispatch, and it just doesn't make feel the red things that you need to take up here. The things that are green don't worry about. So what does that do? Now? It allows the humans to focus on the right things rather than get distracted on the hundreds of things that appear on the screen or what we need to do. That would be a good roll of Ai and that is something we're bringing to our to our analytics lap. Another example I can give you is is is in our writing software. We have a we have a work processor called writer and because some ai enter it and that will apart from the you you'll grammar checks and fell checks that you expect today, it does some interesting stuff. It analyzes your P and if you would let it, and of course he goes, wouldn't foret them to fix what? If you let it do that, it'll actually tell you, you know, I looked at your writing and you know, it will give you a scale and say it's it's hard to read and and it will diagnose that down and it will tell you you have your sentence length appears really long. You know, that's a good insight in me sures you. It may tell you here's some places where you using the passive instead of maybe something that's more positive, like the active and stuff like that. Here's some places where you your ideas have repeated and...

...they are two paragraphs apart. So these are the kinds of things that you know, I thought in using this. I pride myself as a reasonably good writer and I do have an ego about it, but I actually turns the found the first time. I looked for ways to really kill it and I actually found several ways that it actually comes to me. So I wrote back to the developers and that helpfully two what you're doing, but you actually are all the right time to keep doing what they're doing. I love that you willing to admit the the ego portion of it, because a lot of people won't admit that when it comes to ai or things like that, that really what scares them is their own sense of self worth or addition of value and if it can help you get better. I know I'm a firm believer. You know I'm consider myself a decent writer as well, and I can see how, turning that on my you might have to brace yourself a little bit to see what comes up next. But if you can do that, then the output in the value of your effort is more focused, it's cleaner, it you communicate more effectively and it allows you the system to do what human beings are proving not to be very good at, which is the focal point of really revising and getting down to concise and impactful communication. Huh? Not, absolutely right. And I finally, even you know you don't have to. Just because you use the tool, that doesn't mean you abdicate to the tool, right. I mean I'm still override it. You know, I make grammatical imprecision, sometimes with intent. So you want to keep that. There are times in this example where I look at something and it says it will actually point out something and say that's the Cliche and if I'm on it, it is occasion take it out. Yeah, I had a a had a professor in university that, a rhetoric professor, said, hey, sometimes ain't gotten. None is perfectly acceptable. Exactly. All right. So let's let's pive it just a little bit here and talk more about kind of your role at Zoho. I mean she shouted your officer over Forty Products Zoho University. It's Sevenzero employees. That's no small task right. That's no small job. So I'm always interested to find out when you look back over the last year, what is the thing that you're proud of in terms of accomplishments for impact inside of the organization over the last year? We actually, you know, this may sound a little Munday, and it's actually we. It's the product that we really it was called the whole one, and I'll tell you why we're proud of it. It's actually a product suite that includes everything. That's will who put together all those forty applications I was talking about, and the reason and we're proud of it, is there's no other company that has such a broad off right. That's one. And secondly, what we're trying to do is you're trying to fundamentally change the way software is being seen by companies and businesses and certainly by vendors, and let me throw a little bit of light on that there. Traditionally, I've been in this business for a while and traditionally business, software vendors and and customers think of software some sort of this scarce resource that is so valuable that it somehow needs to be perhaps even ration amongst the employees. So you think about are you or you should? I don't know if I should signing up for the CR on software, but we got only thirty see, you know. So what we doing with Zoho one flipping that whole notion on its head by basically taking software and saying software is something that everybody should have and it's not just the source of a lot of innovation. It brings out talent and people. When somebody system that death and has random access to some software that does customer surveys, they will actually use it and their job might be in they might be in the in the mail room, but they might actually use this still by software to find out how they constituent sit doing. And there you go. You created initiative...

...out or nothing. And this is an example of simply providing these capabilities on people's death stops. So what we turned on, it said, was a notion of into the software and being a scarce resource that needs to be a portion in some way. We said software is more like it's like it's almost like a utility. It's on your death you just plug on through it and everybody in your company has access to all of these party apps and then just watch the one. Does that happen? Somebody figures out how to use analytics and decide to use it in their business. Someone has access to a friendshiet that they probably never use or to custom application software, they actually play it on and build their own little customer APP and you see how it opens up innovation and it uncovers initiative in the company. We are standing testimony to that. We do this with all our employees and they find people who come in with an English major who are actually building APPs in the second year. Why? Because they couldn't because the tools are on their desk. Stop. So that's what I'm proud of, because we're trying to change the way people feel with Soho One, that single collection of things and a lot of work point into that to get to this point last year. So that's another that's another paradigm shift right. For a lot of organizations, a lot, a lot of organizations that we work with, we have to ask people in different in different areas of your religion, do you have access to this tool? Give access to that to oh no, we don't have access to that one, but we have ps won instead, and it's like, how do you how do you benefit from the collation active whole if you don't have a consistent stack text acc and now it sounds like you guys have really put something forward. It'll change that approach. Yes, you put it forward and you make everything available to everybody. Of course you create right commission and the organization, but you basically allow people to uncover things and figure out how to use it. They don't need to be taught at training. Humans up fundamentally created. So if you just put that software, people say, I thought there's any play around with this, and it won't be everybody, but it will be that pot of both person and that's all you need to drive innovation in an orgization. Thanks, all right. So let's look into the future. I. So we did this thing. The pasture was over. One very proud of it. When you look through you know the rest of two thousand and nineteen and two thousand and twenty. What's the top thing you're focused on? Se are top concern is to remain competitive and be true to our principles in the kind of markets we work on today, and let me explain that a bit. Today we work in markets that are flushed with cheap capital and easy money. A lot of you know there's most software companies today, if you have the ones on the cloud, a hugely unprofitable and almost proud of it. And you know the genuine concern that we should have, a macro concern, should actually be how unconcerned these companies are about that. You know. So that's fundamentally different from a striggy that we've want to take. We had a private company. We been around for twenty three years. We've been profitable every one of those twenty three years and and we only grow. We've grown very well, at a fairly good tip, comparable would comfortable with many other companies out there. But we only grow if we can be profitable as we grow. And if you're a private company that's a fundamental challenge you face. And perhaps it is self in post because we could have children to go another part, but it goes against the type of values if you want to build. So since we've chosen as a company not to read money at crazy and unsustainable valuation, we have to remain competitive in what we do and that means living within our means and that is the big challenge because we've done it for all these years and when there's so much of capital in the market, you do people doing simpith things, spending a lot of money in marketing, making it tough for for everybody out there, and and and and and this goes back to the notion of long term. Is Right. These many of these companies would stick around for a few years and the company get flipped over or those out of business. And if you in the long term, you have to take the stance that we do. And in some ways, you know, it's like, if you look at the market today, you reminded of what...

Warren Buffett once said. You know, he said something to the effect that it's only when the tide goes out that you know who's been swimming naked. So I think so. I think that's a big challenge, a big challenges to keep to that principle of running a company that take profitable continues to grow, and be able to do that in an environment where there's a lot of money floating around and people don't have to subscribe to those same vadues. Right. So you have you have the double challenge of adhering to the principles in in a see that is extremely choppy and full of a whole bunch of other stuff. I'm assuming you've seen the MARTEX stack or MARTEC five thousand image, right, which is you want to talk about precision, and maybe this is my add kicking in, but it's not the MAR tech five thousand. There's over six thousand companies in that thing. They called them or five thou because it sounds good from a branding perspective. Sorry, got off on a rant there. Obviously that's a button for me. But when you talk about working with all of these, you know, providing all of this individuals and staying profitable, obviously profitabilities easy enough to measure. You mentioned being able to achieve consistent growth on par with other individuals. Do you guys look at things like market share or are there other metrics beyond that? You know, profitability, that you also are concerned about. He's the biggest thing, is the court thing is we happen to be probable. That's almost the tenant for us, you know. So we won't, we won't grow beyond on me and we live within them. So that's one. The second thing is we want to we want to growth, but we want good growth, but we don't grow for growth take when, because what that does is it set up all kinds of distant ventives and bad habits. Pum of it is a propagate way to spend your money. Some of it is is when you that's in a sense for the opening in the capital market. You see how you see how public companies focused on on their quarterly earnings because that's the measure they head to. I mean if they missed the growth, even if the growth is healthy, but they missed it by some number that they promised it would be, they get penalized for it when, if you step back and look at it, the company is still growing at thirty percent. So why did they said it was thirty two and you know so that's the ridiculousness of the goal of the soul picture. So the methics we set is we want to growth, good growth, but not growth for Growth Sake and not if it could come in the way of off the values and the cultures we set. We don't explicitly look at at market share per say. I think when you're a radio play on the market you start to look at those things. We look at retention. That's one big part of what we do. We are in a subscription business. They know our customers have the right and the willingness to walk away tomorrow. They're happy today, and so we have to live with that and that's the that's probably one of the biggest metrics we watch internally is how we keep those customers and what are we doing for them day today. Excellent. And then, in terms of the probability, I would have to believe that having Zo who university and finding those people who are going to add to the culture and grow with the organization and then having an educational structure to enable that has also been beneficial, I would think, in terms of maintaining that profitability. As a court tenant of the organization. Is My actor in that assessment. Yes, part of you know, zoo university is is, you know, we talked about such a little bit already, and it comes from a certain set of convictions that we have and part of it is, I would say, all is not just business. It is also, you know, sociological in some sense, you know. So we don't subscribe to the views that that students should have to pay what they do for an education today, and we have, especially in this country, we have the sad situation where...

...the average student has something like thirty five to Fortyzero in death and they graduate and many, many of them are for more and this is simply not a way to build a society where we let the next generation start out the degree of debt. So that is part of some of the things that came out here. So when we get people into Zoho University, we actually we actually pay them. We pay them a site and and what happened and the honest to be honest with it, because we don't offer a degree, you wind up getting students who don't value degrees or generally, students from wealthy of background tend not to take this up because they're still enamored by the degree. Want to spend that money. And so most of the people come to US tend to come from sections of society might not otherwise have that opportunity. And then you you, that's when you start to see the other things play out, because of all, you've got these people and they motivated. They probably didn't have this opportunity. Many of them may not have gone to college. And now you have the set of people, you have the ability to train. Then they have the abilify can mold them. You have the ability to put opportunities in front of them and then you see many of them actually step up. And if we are relatively loose in our valuation, we don't come in. Thank so he today things are still specialized. People hire somebody with the PhD in Ai, you know, that's the kind of thing they look at. We bring in somebody at the high school level, we train them in broadly software engineering and we get them into into a role and many times we find that people work out and sometimes they don't. Send that cool, will find something else for them to do. After all, we're brum a company. We have people and Engineering, your people in support. We have SISIM in writing with people in everything in marketing and email right. So we find at a spot for them. So that allows you to be less rigid in the way you valuate people. It allows you to have a culture that allows people to have a second chance and a third chance, because if you don't do that, you wind up making an assumption that something didn't work out because the candidates was wrong. At this all the the employee was wrong and it could just as well likely that the company was wrong and put the person bout jobs. So you see how all these fit together. When you have this thing, it allows you to be more flexible, it allows you to work with a culture that is lets rigid and therefore allows people to grow into something that they might otherwise not have had exposures. When when I look at all of it, when I hear you talk about all of it, and I know I come back to the education piece, but when I hear you know that we talked about Ai, we talked about forty products into one, enabling organizations, I mean you have a very I can't think of a better better word than wise, in my opinion, tenants that underlies the organization and I obviously have proven to be extremely valuable, because you guys been around for twenty three years. Is Zoho University something that you guys do one hundred percent internally? Was that developed? I mean it's been around twelve years. Says that all internally, or do you plug in other things that maybe your employees are asking for as well? Now it's all done internally. So the the teachers, that people who teach many of our employees and look forward to this opportunity actually so. Some of them actually want to go and teach as though university and we have. It's a completely internal perspective. A lot of it is because we wanted to retain this culture. We're not trying, will never go and try and create an accredited university. We don't believe in the notion providing a degree out of it and so on. So we don't want to be influenced by third parties who might have those kinds of conflicting aims. So this is something we want to do because it's the right thing to do for people who don't have an opportunity. It also helps some business and it helps company take that responsibility where we started this conversation, of being part of building people up, rather than waiting for parents and educational institutions to have to deliver that...

...to them. It's taking the responsibility and the accountability into the organizational level. Very very much. It puts a smile on my face. I'm glad. I'm glad to hear that. So let's get that direction a little bit here. I ask all of our guests kind of two standard questions towards the end of every interview in the first is your chief strategy officer. So for sales people that makes you a potential prospect or you know, we can call it target to but they're people want to get in front of you and I'm always curious to understand when somebody doesn't have a referral, when they don't have that trusted in a relationship with somebody that you trust, what have you for you personally, what do you find the most effective way for someone to capture your attention and get that fifteen minutes on your calendar to talk to you about something they believe is going to provide value to you? When I'm engaging with the person, it's actually fairly simple for me. When I'm engaging with someone, I always look to see if they would listen all would they rather talk? It's a very supo set, you know. So all they listening? Did they understand my requirements or pain point? But whatever it is, if they miss that, then they don't disiver hearing. Because you're trying to get my attention, you should be listening to me. And if you saw a lot of tens when I get on these things that people try to reach out and I find them coming there with it in gender and maybe a yellow fade pool of no on, so I realize they've missed the point. The ability to listen is so is becoming such a rare commodity these days, right, I see it all the time. People just want to talk and talk and talk. All right. So last question. We call it our acceleration in sight. There's one thing you could tell sales, marketing or consultants out there, one piece of advice that, if they listen to you give them, that you believe will help them hit their targets. What would it be, and why? Again, this is fairly I would say, do fewer things better. I love it. Let me just explain what I mean by that. You know, we have the situation today where we have all these modern tools and technologies that all collectively conquire to distract here and make you feel that you really producted, you know, and that's the whole we are rent. I would I would reject many other you know. So your emails are really as important as you think, as the time you can go to it, if you think it is. If you do, your to do lists are probably way too long to be meaningful. You have projects with I would say you take on some. If you take on some projects, you just look for that twenty percent of what you should walk on then deliver seventy eight percent of the outcome and just forget about the rest. Ignore the rest. I think today is because of all these other stagg multitask. multitasking, I think, is a really lazy way of avoiding folk pussing on the job you need to get done just to if you have it's I'm it's a powerful statement, right. I mean, there is no such thing anybody who I'm a kind of a brain science guy, and so there is no way for the human brain to actually multitask you in contact with but if you think you're multitasking, you're basically screwing up two things simultaneously. Thanks astly, exactly all right, if you jay so. Thank you very much for being on show. I want to make sure that our listeners, if there's somebody out there that wants to get in touch with you to explore Zoho, one or other elements in the conversation, theyve what's the what's the best way to go about that trip on Linkedin or the website? What works best for you? They could definitely finding on Linkedin. They could also I'll put my email advis I'll pay it my ja, my first name, doc last name. Some of that I'm the J dots, some that I'm had. Soho, corpcom. Thanks. Thank you again for being on the show. Has Been An absolute pleasure to talk to you. Thank you, Chad. Same here. I fund it all right, everybody that does it. For this episode, check us out of be to be REV exactcom share the episode of friends, families, Co workers. You know the drill right as review give us suggestions. I guess you...

...want to hear from it. Until next time, we have value selling associates. Wish you all nothing but the greatest success. You've been listening to the BB revenue executive experience. To ensure that you never miss an episode, subscribe to the show and Itunes or your favorite podcast player. Thank you so much for listening. Until next time.

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