The B2B Revenue Executive Experience
The B2B Revenue Executive Experience

Episode · 4 years ago

Eric Berggren on Customer Value: Why Organizations Fail to Get It Right

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Every successful business needs to sell something at a price where they can make enough money. If they can’t, they’re going to go out of business.

If that’s the fundamental challenge, we’ve got to understand how customers decide to buy. Everybody talks about value, but nobody really tells you how to do it.

That’s what we’re addressing in this episode with Eric Berggren, Professor of Marketing from Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern and Managing Director of Axios Partners. In Eric’s words, “Customers decide to buy based on the value they get from one product versus another. Whatever nets out to be the best value, that’s where they’re going to go.”

Listen in to hear Eric explore the topic of customer value inside and out.

Find a breakdown of this episode here.

There is no one size fits allsolution for optimizing your sales and marketing organizations. Yet how you sell and market isa tremendous differentiator. Value Prime Solutions uses proven formulas and frameworks with acustomized approach to increase your sales and Marketing Roi to learn more about how wecan help you, visit value Prime Solutionscom. You're listening to the BB revenue executiveexperience, a podcast dedicated to helping the executives train their sales and marketingteams to optimize growth. Whether you're looking for techniques and strategies or tools andresources, you've come to the right place. Let's accelerate your growth in three,two, one. Welcome everyone to the B Tob Revenue Executive Experience.I'm your host, Chad Sanderson. Today we're going to be talking about whyorganizations struggle to understand customer perceptions of value, why this failure creates challenges for growingbusinesses, especially those focused on becoming truly customer centric and understanding what itmeans to do that and to deliver that. Telbus tackle the topic. We havewith US Eric bregranded, professor of marketing from Kellogg School of Management.At northwestern and managing director of axios Partners Management Consulting firm, focus on drivingcustomer value and innovation and management. So, Eric Wing to thank you for takingtime to be on the show today. Hey, it's my pleasure. I'mlooking forward to our conversation as excellent. So, as we said kind ofbefore we start recording, we'll keep this as conversational as possible, butwe always like to start when we talk to our guests about you know,if you look back over your career, was there a defining moment where anevent that happened that taught you something, that lessons that you keep going backto? Just kind of help us understand what that event or where that thingwas and what kind of lessons you took away from it and why. Sure, I started at one of the big prestigious strategy consulting firms and one ofmy assignments there was to lead a strategy project for a natural gas supplier.The industry. Conventional Wisdom was that the business sold a commodity, a molecularmethane is a molecular methan and in fact I can buy natural gas here inChicago from you. You put it in a pipeline in Oklahoma and I takeout somebody else's molecular methane here in Chicago and we all call it. Evenso, if that's not a commodity, I'm not quite sure what is.It seems like the definition of a commodity, which meant I thought this strategy projectwas going to be about the fastest strategy project ever conducted. Because ifyou're the low cart, you really need to be if it's a truly acommodity business, you've got to be the low cost supplier and you should focuseverything around cutting costs. But we challenge that a sound sho we figured outwhat was really valuable to their customers and found several ways to differentiate the offeringwith value added services, systems and programs...

...or wrapped around the moleculum me thing, and as a result, our client was able to increase their price,their profit margins improved by forty percent, wow, and their customer satisfaction wentfrom the bottom couretile to number two out of a hundred ninety eight, allwithin eighteen months. Excellent, so I so. I was thinking about that. I'm thinking, man, they raised price in the commodity market and theircustomers liked it, liked them even more for it. So at that pointI was I was pretty much hooked. I learned that, you know,really understanding customer value is critical and that there's money to be made in challengingthe industry conventional wisdom. Excellent, excellent. Is that what led you to,you know, go more down an Academy of path? I mean thatit's pretty prestigious university and professorship there some kind of curious what can I losethat? What pushed you in the direction or what was it that led youthere? The I think lead as probably the rather than me leading myself.It happened naturally. Is More what happened, you know, as a strategy consultant. Yea, the fundamental questions were what markets and customers should we serveand how are we going to profitably win their business? and to me thatall came down to customer value, and the thought leaders in customer value werein marketing. So it wasn't necessarily a drive to get into marketing, itjust happened that way. So following and exactly exactly, and then in myconsulting I've always focused on building the capability within the client to become self sufficient. So in effect I was more of a coach or or teacher and inan on plot in and more of an applied learning environment. So I've kindof had that bent forward teaching to begin with. So as all this kindof came together, I was really absolutely quite plattered when the chair of theMarketing Department of Kellog invited me to join the faculty. It's such a smartand talented group that I constantly learn and enhance my knowledge just from from workingwith them. Excellent, excellent. So when we were preper for the show, we settled on the topic of customer value and why organizations struggle to understandit. It's a topic obviously near and Jue to my heart and it's onethat's actually getting a lot of play kind of in the social sphere right now. A lot of people talking about well, everybody says you know value, butnobody really tells you how to do it, and so I'm kind ofcurious. Was it that instance with, you know, the methane and thecommodity market realization? What was it about that customer value of me? Youreally want to dig into it, to understand it and to help others understandand it more effectively. Yeah, I think it was that that example,because every successful business needs to sell something a customer at a price where theycan make enough money. If they can't, they're going to go out of business. And if that's the fundamental challenge...

...that we have, we got tounderstand how customers decide to buy, and I think customers decide to buy basedon the value they get from one product versus the value they get from anotherproduct, and they compare that to the price differential of those two products andwhatever nets out to be the best value and use for them, that's that'swhere they're going to go. So I mean returned that they see from whenyou see value. So let's dive in that just a little bit. Itsounds like you're talking about business, the business return of the business value.Wouldn't the value that somebody sees vary on their on their role inside of anorganization and exactly, and that's what makes be to be marketing so interesting,that there are there is value that accrues to the organization and then there arepeople within that organization who may see only part of that value it or itmay even be that they're pretty they're more of an influencer in the purchase andthey won't personally see any of the value they're they're performing kind of their corporateduty the point the company and in the best direction. So trying to understandvalue, we're going to talk at the think we'll talk something a lot todayabout understanding value, but it really does have to apply at both the individualand the company level. thankcellent and so all right, so let's start withkind of a contextual examples for our listeners so they understand what we're talking abouthere. So if you can kind of give us an example of how anideal company would approach this and then we can dive into some details. Okay, so the customer value leaders do for things really well. They the firstone is they choose value, when what I mean by that is they makeit a conscious choice. So much of the value that we delivered to customerstoday is series of incremental decisions that may have made sense at at one pointin time, but we just kind of muddle through and it's not really takingthat step back and thinking holistically frequently enough that we are making what I wouldconsider a conscious choice in commitment to a winning value proposition. Okay. Thesecond thing they do is they're very good at creating value, and by thatI mean they think of both their organization and all the partner organizations in theirsupply chain or in their in their delivery value delivery network as kind of oneentity and they figure out, if we were all one big organization, whatwould be the best way to deliver on this promise of value. And nowhow do I create not only the incentives for the customer to buy, buthow do I create the incentives for all of these moving parts, some ofwhich I don't have any direct authority over, to to behave the way I needthem to behave in order to fulfill that promise to that end customer?So then the third thing that they're really good at is communicating value. Sothey if you ask them what's the value...

...proposition for a product, they don'tgive you a list of seven benefits. They give you they stay clearly two, three, maybe at most three things that are in fact the highest impactsources of value for that for that target customer, and they're good at alsooffering a reason to believe for that customer that they're going to get that valuefrom your offering. And the last thing they're really good at is converting value, and I use the term convert instead of capture. A lot of peoplelike to talk about capturing value, but that has kind of a zero sumgame feel to me about it, that there's only a certain amount of valuethere and and it's an adversary or relationship with the customer to figure out who'sgoing to capture it. And I like convert because the term convert because it'snot so much as zero sum game. There may be pricing mechanisms that wecan do that cost us almost nothing and deliver still more value to the customer. So we're actually a pricing in a way that that we are converting valuefor our getting our fair share of that value, but we're actually growing thepie in the process of managing our pricing. Excellent. Okay. So the firstone the conscious you may hear conscious choice. Right, we see there'sa lot of talk about that these days, but but the vast majority of organizations, and it's probably what keeps us both employed, have a tendency tothink of themselves first. Right. They focus on products, feel good statements. It's all very you know Ra Rock, who about why why do you think, even though the vast majority of I would say, you know,intelligent, for people that I talked to understand that they need to make aconscious choice to focus on value or make change? Why do you think organizationshave a tendency to keep falling back into that run of, you know,products and features? It's because we start with the wrong question. Yeah,so I we start by asking how we're better than the competition. Then featuresare the natural response. We're going to list the things where we actually arebetter than the competition. But the starting question shouldn't be that. The startingquestion should be what is the true customer trying to accomplish and what role,then, could we play in enabling that? So we got to get the startingquestion about value to be from the customer's perspective right off the Bat.Most ant challenging right. That can be challenge, especially when you've got boardmembers and private equity firms that have invested or executives are all like you knowthere's so focused on the numbers. I think they sometimes do themselves a disservice. I can't pull themselves out to understand that a simple change in the perspectiveof the question can lead to much more impactful results, not only for yourown organization but for the customers that you engage with. Right well, andthe other the other thing that you mentioned...

...about going to the other extreme,which, instead of having a very specific feature that everybody can kind of gettheir head around, we kind of default to these vague platitudes like quality andrelationship and, of course my favorite, my new favorite, is complete endend solutions. So these are just empty words. They've been overused to thepoint that they really have lost their ability to convey differentiation. But we endup here because it's expedient. So getting to this deeper level of value requiressome time in a lot of worthwhile internal debate. But in a short meetingwe can all agree that our product is a high quality solution and that weare reliable partners with our customer in their quest to succeed. So you canquickly agree on some of these vague platitudes, because you know who's going to say, Oh, well, we want to be a low quality, unreliableto fire and and to none of your competitors are going to claim bad yeah, we're cheaper, but we're really unreliable and we're very low quality. Soyou know, those kind of empty words are expedient for us because we canagree to them, but they're not going to move the needle in terms ofour sales and marketing. So so making conscious decisions, being more purposeful andslowing down a little bit. It sounds like we would be advantageous for someof these companies taking the time to really do the right type of self analysis, as well as visionary strategic analysis of where you want to go. Exactly, exactly, excellent. So when we were going back and forth setting usup, you mentioned three levels where companies need to understand and articulate customer value, performance outcomes and worth those one if you break those down for our listeners? Why those areas? Sure the first, though, we've got to remember thevalue as a relative term. We can't think about the value of ouroffering without comparing it to something else, some alternative that the customer has.Preferably, we're comparing ourselves to what the customer would perceive to be their nextbest alternative to us, because that's really the value we need to beat.If we can beat the next best alternative, we're not going to have any troublebeating everybody else. So it's the first thing is you can't talk aboutvalue on any of the three levels unless you have some alternative in mind thatyou about what you're measuring at Varu them. So the most basic level of understandingis our performance versus that next best alternative. But we need to doit across the entire customer journey and we need to do it from the customersperspective. So most companies are pretty good at understanding the customer journey for theactual product. Using the actual product, they've gotten pretty good or better atunderstanding kind of the buying journey, but they still tend to not have asgood and understanding about all the other aspects...

...of the total customer journey. Andwe also still have this bias where we end up not really thinking from thecustomers perspective. We still phrase the questions and gather the data in a waythat it still feels like it's it's more about us. So most companies areat this first level and they're doing kind of US body job. Some aredoing pretty well and some areas, but it's really hard to be nail onthis level on on all dimensions. So then the second one is okay.So there's some performance difference. So we're better at something. The question is, so what you know? What does that difference how does that difference affectthe customer? So we need to understand what's the outcome for the customer ofany of these performance differences, because that's really what they're focused on. They'retrying to accomplish some some task or job or achieve some objective. To whatdegree are we either helping them achieve that objective or hindering them in achieving thatobjective relative to the other ways that they could be pursuing that objective? Andthe third level is that not all, not all outcomes are equally important.So we need to assess, preferably in monetary terms. You know, whateach meaningful outcome is worth to the customer and while we can't put everything intomonetary terms, there's always going to be some intangibles. We want to strivefor monetary terms because it it basically is the easiest measuring stick that we canuse in the selling situation. So if we can get it there, that'sthat's ideal. And what we found is that quantifying value in monetary terms ischallenging for for everybody. So otherwise everybody would have already done right if itwere easy. So exactly, exactly so. But we found is that when youget that right, it really moves the needle. It affects, itmotivates the customer and it affects your sales win rates, can shorten your salecycle. Things like that excellent. So going back to that perform and whenwe talk about traditional market research, you mentioned personas and journeys and things likethat. I'm curious. You know, I've seen a lot of companies spendsignificant amounts of money on efforts to map customer buy our journeys put together,you know, their types of personas or empathy maps, things like that.But it is, as you said, it is very hard for them tonot do it from a perspective that doesn't include them first. So if somebodywere approaching that kind of stuff, were conducting at what would you say wouldbe the best approaches for doing that so that you could get through performance outcomeinto worth? Yes, we use two...

...different approaches, one for each level. So in terms of understanding outcomes, we prefer to use a more anthropologicalor ethnographically inspired approach. So you know, if you're trying to understand about theculture of the people on an island in the South Pacific. You don'tgive them the survey. You go out and you live with them and youbecome part of the culture and that's how you become. That's how we wouldlike to try to become our customer. Now, unfortunately, we can't justgo live with our customer for a year and internalize everything. That's not goingto be practical. So we have what we call a day in the lifeof the customer analysis where we go on site to the customer with a crossfunctional team from the client to observe and ask questions of a cross functional teamof the customer, the clients customer, to help us better understand what arethe objectives in the priorities that they have with the customer has and for themost important objectives, we want them to show us how they're trying to accomplishthem now and it's not until we understand how they're trying to accomplish it.What works well, it doesn't work well, what are the consequences when it doesn'twork well? Then and only then do we ask well, how doesour offering help, or might not necessarily help, achieve those objectives. So, as you can see, this kind of question. He goes back toour original conversation about well, to succeed with customer value you got to startwith the right question, and the right questions all focus on understanding the customerand what they're trying to achieve. Are The question of how we're performing isthe last thing we ask rather than the first thing we ask right right forunderstanding the worth. I use my colleague, Professor James Anderson, as Cuz hiscustomer value modeling approach. He describes it in his book value merchants andhe's also added in a couple HP articles that you can read about as well. But here we build a model to estimate the bottom line impact of thoseperformance different princes that are offering creates. Now this is different from a totalcost of ownership study because in this approach we only focus on the points ofdifference. So where our product performs equally to the next best alternative, weput all that data aside and don't bother gathering any of it, because theknock the not what we found with total cost of ownership is that you've gotto get the data for any impact that your product could have anywhere in theorganization and that list gets really, really long and it invites the customers tosay, you know, I don't have the time, I'm not going toparticipate in this. I don't have the time. You're asking for way toomuch data. So this customer value modeling...

...approach, by just focusing it inon a couple of key points of difference, it allows us to gain the customers, be more likely to gain the customers participation and not waste everyone's timegathering data that we know if the performance is equal, we know the differentialvalue is, by definition, going to be zero. So it's really bothof these approaches are a process of joint discovery with the customer. So weapproach them in a way that we're saying we don't know what the answers are. We've got a way to understand what you're trying to do and what theeconomic impact of getting better at doing that might be and we want to exploreyou know what those possibilities are. They maybe include things that you never thoughtwe could do for you, and and that's that. You know, that'sour ideal outcome from from these kind of efforts uncover something unexpected. So setsthe stage for innovation based on the exact real data, real day, andI mean I spent the last ten years of my career trying to explain toexecutives the difference between ethnographic and anthropological research. I hope you've cracked it better thanI ever did. But once you get them past that point, onceonce they understand that they need to do this research, it really probably shouldbe done by an outside party that is unbiased. It doesn't bring, youknow, those perspectives that can color create the rose colored glasses types of stuff. Once you get them through that point and they get that data, thenwhat's the next step? How do you advise them to take it back intothe organization and make it actionable? Well, there the quick hit is to takeyour most differentiated product first. Just focus on your most differentiated products andget this level of understanding, because then you could use that information to finetune your segmentation and targeting, because you now know better what drives value forthe different types of customers. You can use that to focus your communication onwhat will be the most motivating to the customer and improve your marketing sales effectivenessthat way. And lastly, no knowing what it's worth, you may beable to raise price or at least stand firmer in reducing some of the unmanageddiscounting that's going on. Longer term, you can feed these insights into newproduct development, customer experience and customer success efforts to help them prioritize what they'redoing. Excellent. When we work with customers, we talked a lot aboutthe difference between a customer persona and a buyer persona. Right the person,because we focus on me said, on sales and marketing organizations, but whenyou're focused on a buyer, marketing has a tendency to provide all these customerpersonas right to the sales organization, like Hey, this is how you shouldapproach this person, this is what they care about. But it be tobe especially large scale enterprise. The person who actually signs a check probably thelast person that ever is going to use the product or solution. Right.They have to grant green light it somewhere.

So I'm curious how you know youwould work with or enable or focus on that. That sales conundrum ofokay, you went out, you did the research. We know you knowhow to do the performance outcomes a worth. We know what that is for artorganization. How do you then funnel that and fuel that into a salesorganization so they're better prepared in their own efforts to uncover their customers perceptions ofvalue? Yeah, so the tried say a couple things. One is totry to drive that alignment in the organization these both of the these techniques areled jointly by sales and marketing. So the customer value modeling is a jointeffort. The dialogs or a joint effort and by going to those two higherlevels of understanding of value, it drives sales and marketing to get on thesame page in a much more specific way than they ever have before. Soit it forces the organization to agree on what that winning value is for eachof those personas in instead of settling for some of these vague, vague platitudesor numbing them the features. And I you know and if you don't,it's got to be led by the leaders of the sales and Marketing Organization.If they aren't pushing this and it comes down to how they spend their time. I mean if I'm trying to understand what's important to chief marketing officer orchief Revenue Officer. I don't ask you know, what's important to them.I ask them how they're spending their time, because that's the best clue to meabout what they really think is important. So if they're not spending their timeon making sure that this integration is happening, your destined to have aflavor of the month. You're just not gonna do it well. You'RE gonnanot see the results without that sales and marketing integration. Is that a challengeablewhen you go and work with a new organization or or people come to youand ask for for your help, is that one of the first places youlook? We're one of the things. It's on your your checklist to makesure that not only are sales and marketing involved, but that the leadership iscompletely behind it. And if they're not, do you have ways that you goabout perhaps showing them the value of the initiative itself? Yes, sothat's the single you've had. Chad. You've hit on the single biggest reasonwhy these kind of efforts fail right the senior management. Of Senior Management's noton board and it really I single out sales and marketing, but it reallyis a cross functional requirement for these things to succeed, because a kind ofnew sources of value that you're going to come up with, they're not goingto be within the control of sales and marketing to make happen. So andthat's why we bring across functional team when we do these this kind of analysis, because we're trying to create kind of a ground swell, a bottoms upapproach to generating some enthusiasm. Now,...

...the way that we try to generatethe enthusiasm from the leadership team up front is the very same kind of examplesthat we try to practice what we preach with our clients. So so webuild a business case, we try to we describe here's the steps that youneed to go through, here's the resources that are required, here's what othercompanies have experienced when they've done the same thing and they've really committed to wouldincluding the leadership, and we can also share examples of feel when the leadershipsnot behind it. Now we should just walk away because I'm sure we'd liketo have the fees, but it's just not going to get you the resultsthat you want. Yeah, which ends up doing nothing but wasting their time. Damaging your brand, wasting your time. You know, I mean, it'sjust it becomes a bit of a challenge. I I've seen a lotof transform and I've kind of been going on a round linked in about thislately. Transformation becomes kind of the buzz word and everybody wants it, butnobody, I'd say, executives have a tendency to struggle with the fact thatthat means they have to be on board and they have to ask themselves differentquestions and take different perspectives. They have to support it, break down thosesilos that we sew often see in those large enteral prizes. And if they'renot behind it, I've just gotten a point where it's like, when youguys are ready, you know where I'm at, but but I'm not.I don't want to waste your time, I don't want to impact your businessin a negative way or, quite frankly, my own brand, if you guysare going to be completely on board with it. It's a very challengingand I would say, and maybe I'm wrong, if it's a defining momentin the relationship that you have with your customers. Is that making sure thateverybody's in alignment. Yeah, you that's a great, great approach to adand and you're absolutely right. So all right, let's talk about let's saywe've talked about all of the the kind of the theory of it. Westarted with the Chemical Company. Let's talk about if you give us another exampleof a customer that had a problem that you're we're allowed to talk about publicly, but because it had a problem, kind of what were those problems?How'd you engage in work through this with them, and what were the werethe net results? kind of walk us through that, that journey of thatengagement. Sure, sure, we had a medical device and medical supply companythat was finding that their products were commoditized. Some of them were in fact comdetizedby themselves. They had white they had licensed out the underlying technology toa competitor, figuring that that would they get, you know, a licensingfee on all of the sales in the market by doing that. But nowthey had a pretty formidable competitor. So we started one offering at a timeand I think that's kind of this is. This is more of a bottoms upkind of approach. I mean you'll you'll see a lot of approaches whereit's analyze everything in the company first and then start carving it up from there. We take the opposite approach. We want to create a win quickly,so we take the most differentiated offerings.

You know, our clients are alwaystempted to say, Hey, this is a product we haven't been able tosell or we we have to discount heavily to sell at can you, canyou work your magic on this? And I said, we have we haveno magic. So answer that is no. If it my hunch is it's notdifferentiated. And going through this process we made come up with some newways of differentiating it, and I'll give you a quick example of that.Where we had, well they had contact plates, which are, if Idon't if you remember from high school science, little peatree dishes, but contquer contactplates are basically the same things that they have a medium on a alreadyinstalled on it so that when you place like a sample of blood onto theplate, it starts to react and it can tell you whether you have acertain virus or you have a certain bacteria. But no matter who who offers thecontact plate, it has to react the same way. Otherwise we're goingto get all sorts of funky resolves right. So they had figured it was acommodity business. We're going to cut costs. They created a new wayof manufacturing these plates and the lids, but the lids stuck now, soyou had to pinch them and turn them a little bit to open them up. And they thought, well, it's ten percent cheaper to manufacture, sowe'll share the savings with the customer. will cut price by five percent.We went out, we to industrial labs and found out that they stack thesecontact plates ten, twenty high and they get knocked over all the time.The lids come off in the experiments ruined. So it turned out that the consequencesor the outcome of that, of those falls of the contact plates amountedto seventy five percent of the cost of the plate itself. Because these werelike the Eli lillies of the world. They had to file all sorts ofreports. I had to Redo the test, but then they had to file allsorts of incident reports in the laboratory and have things cleaned and changed inall this stuff. So it was really, really expensive. So instead of alowering price by five percent, we actually raised it by twenty percent andthey still met all their revenue, all their sales targets. So we tookbad and then we went to another instrument that they instrument, the tested blood, and they had were using the vague well, we're easier to use argument, and we did this analysis for that and we found that ease of usein this case meant that a junior technician could run the instrument. So itdidn't have to be in their microbiology lab, which is a very specialized lab inthe hospital. It could just be put in the general lab which runsand a lot of hospitals that runs twenty four hours a day, but microonly runs one or two shifts a day. And then you could get the resultto the doctor faster, which could get the right medicine to the patientfaster. And there was just tremendous amount of value for getting that instrument outof the micro lab. And but that's...

...what if you just left it iteasy to use, it didn't really mean anything to anybody. But if yousay well, look, it's easier to use, so now you can moveit over there, you know cheaper person running it and you can run attwenty four seven and lower your length of stay for your patients. Now allof a sudden there's just dollar bells. Yeah, sides everyone right. Sowe just started picking these off and we've been through twenty plus of their offeringsand they get dramatic results. That's excellent. It's amazing to me, like said, having spent the last ten years working with experience, digital experience specifically, but it's always amazing to me how that observational research and and really payingattention from an outside view of what's going on, being, you know,purposeful and and Temple, how that uncovers things that many people just don't seemto understand and opportunities that the business can definitely benefit from. So I'm gladto see that it's producing producing results for your customers as well. So let'schange direction a little bit here. I ask all of our guests kind oftwo standard questions towards the end of each interview. In the first one is, you know, you're an executive at actually, as you obviously you know, have people coming after you that want to get into the university as well. So we like to help our audience understand, you know, how tobe how to effectively capture someone's attention if you were prospecting to them were wantedto get in front of them. So, from your perspective, what's the mosteffective way to capture your attention or start to build credibility so that aconversation can ensue? Well, you probably won't be surprised by this answer Founour conversation so far, but you gotta length. You gotta link it toone of my top priorty are concerns. There are a lot of things thatI could be doing right now more efficiently that would save me time and saveme money, but that's not my primary objective right now. There's no wayI'm going to save my way to prosperity. I have to also view the offeringthere, for is kind of a strategic purchase, if it's not reallyvery strategic to me. It's really more efficient use of my time to justrepurchase what I've already been doing and I have to learn something new. SoI'm leaving tons of positive roy products on the table because I just don't havethe time to implement them and it's just not the major focus for me.So if you've linked it to that priority or concern that's really driving my behaviorright now in my where my mind is right now, then the main thingis I need some kind of proof that the performance is superior and that Icould reliably expect to experience that from you. Excellent. Okay. And so lastquestion. We call it our acceleration insight. So if there's one thingthat you could tell sales, marketing or professional services people, one piece ofadvice that you think would help them be better, be more effective beat theirtargets, what would it be? In why? Don't cutch it, don'tcut short the understanding and communicating customer value.

All the forces in business tend topush you the other way, to be quick and to be superficial aboutit. But after resist that temptation because when you understand and demonstrate superior value, you just get dramatic and immediate results from it. Excellent, excellent.Will Perfect Erica. For listeners interested and talking more about the topics we've coveredtoday, what's the best way to get in contact with you? But theycan connect with me on linked in or they could go to the axist partnerswebsite and see what we do there and contact me through there. That's wwwdot CEOS axios partners, paartnrs inkcom. That's all. One word punctuation.All right, excellent. I can't thank you enough for your time today.This has been great having it on the show. You're welcome customer. Asyou can tell, I love talking about customer value. I have a feelingwe probably could go on for hours. No doubt, no doubt. Allright, everyone that does it for this episode. Please check us out atbe to be REV exaccom. Share the episode of Friends, family, Coworkers and if you like what you're here, please dose a favorite read review onitunes. Keeps the content fresh and we actually use that to focus inwhat types of guests to bring on the show. So, until next time, we have value prime solutions with you all, nothing but the best andthe greatest success. You've been listening to the BB revenue executive experience. Toensure that you never miss an episode, subscribe to the show and Itunes oryour favorite podcast player. Thank you so much for listening. Until next time,.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (238)