The B2B Revenue Executive Experience
The B2B Revenue Executive Experience

Episode · 4 years ago

Eric Berggren on Customer Value: Why Organizations Fail to Get It Right

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Every successful business needs to sell something at a price where they can make enough money. If they can’t, they’re going to go out of business.

If that’s the fundamental challenge, we’ve got to understand how customers decide to buy. Everybody talks about value, but nobody really tells you how to do it.

That’s what we’re addressing in this episode with Eric Berggren, Professor of Marketing from Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern and Managing Director of Axios Partners. In Eric’s words, “Customers decide to buy based on the value they get from one product versus another. Whatever nets out to be the best value, that’s where they’re going to go.”

Listen in to hear Eric explore the topic of customer value inside and out.

Find a breakdown of this episode here.

There is no one size fits all solutionfor optimizing, your sales and marketing organizations. Yet how yousell and market is a tremendous differentiator value. Prime solutionsuses proven formulas in frameworks with a customized approach to increase yoursales in marketing Roi to learn more about how we can help you visit value,Prime Solutionscom you're, listening to the BTB revenueexecutive experience, a podcast, dedicated elpin executives, train theirsales and marketing teams to optimize growth, whether you're looking fortechniques and strategies were tools and resources. You've come to the rightplace. Let's accelerate your growth in three two one: welcome everyone to theB Tob Revenue Executive Experience, I'm youre host, chats Anderson. Today we'regoing to be talking about why organization struggle to understandcustomer perceptions of value why this failure creates challenges for growingbusinesses, especially those focused on becoming truly customer centric andunderstanding what it means to do that and to deliver that ell US tackle thetopic we have. I with US Eric Regaran, professor of marketing, from KelogSchool of Management at northwestern and managing director of axios partners,management, consulting firm, focused on driving customer value and innovationand management. So Eric want to thank you for taking time to be on the showtoday, hey it's my pleasure, I'm looking forward to our conversation,excellent. So, as we said kind of before we start recording, we keep.This is conversational as possible, but we always like to start when we talk toour guests about you know. If you look back over your career, was there adefining moment or an event that happened, that taught you somethingthat lessons that you keep going back to just Koind tof help us understandwhat that event or where that thing was and what kind of lessons you took awayfrom it, and why sure I started at one of the big prestigious strategy,consulting firms and one of my assignments. There was to lead astrategy project for a natural gas supplier. The industry conventional wisdom wasthat the business solda commodity molecule ofmethain is a Molecula methon and in fact I can buy natural gas herein Chicago from you. You put it in a pipeline in Oklahoma, and I take outsomebody else's molecule Amethein here in Chicago, and we all call it. Even so. If that's not a commodity, I'm notquite sure what is it seems like the definition of a commodity, which meantI thought this strategy project was going to be about the fastest strategyproject ever conductod, because if you're, the local, youreally need to be. If it's a truly commodity business, you've got to bethe lowcost supplier and you should focus everything around havin costs.But we challenge that assumption. We figured out what was really valuable totheir customers and found several ways to differentiate...

...the offering with valueadded servicessystems and programs wrapped around the molecul on Ethin and as a result, ourclient was able to increase their price. Their profit margins improved by fortypercent wew and their customer satisfaction went from the bottomcartile to number two out of a hundred and ninety eight all within eighteenmonths. Excellent. So I so I was thinking about that. I'm thinking manthey raised price in the commodity market and their customers liked itlike them even more for it. So at that point I was, I was prettymuch hooked. I learned that you know really understanding. Customer value iscritical and that there's money to be made in challenging the industryconventional wisdom. Excellent excellent, is that what led you to youknow go more down on a academian path. I mean it's pretty prestigiousuniversity and professorship there so'me kind of curious. What cind ofHAPP was that what pushed you in thet direction or what was it that led youthere yeah, I think lead is probably the rather than me leading myself. It happened. Naturally, is more whathappened? You know yea as a strategy consultant. You knowthe fundamental questions were what markets and customers should we serve,and how are we going to profitably win their business and to me that all camedown to customer value and the FAULHT leaders in customer value were inmarketing, so it wasn't necessarily a drive to get into marketing. It justhappened that way to foll an exactly exactly and then in my consulting I've,always focused on building the capability within the client to becomeself sufficient. So in effect I was more of a coach or or teacher and in aninplot an Moreben applied learning environment, so I've kind of had thatbent toward teaching to begin with. So as all this kind of came together, Iwas really absolutely quite flattered when the chair, the Marking Department,had Kellug invited me to during the faculty. It's such a smart and talentedgroup that I constantly learn and enhance my knowledge just from fromworking with them, excellent excellent. So when we were prepered for the show,we settled on the topic of customer Value D, Ndwy organizations struggle tounderstand it. It's a topic obviously near and dure O my heart, and it's one:That's actually getting a lot of play kind of in the social spher right now,a lot of people talking about well, everybody says you know value, butnobody really tells you how to do it, and so I'm kind of curious was at thatinstance with you know the methane and the commodity market, realization. Whatwas it about that customer value Ma really want to dig into it tounderstand it and help others understand it more effectively, yeah. Ithink it was that bad example, because every successful business needs to sellsomething customer o price where they can make enough money if they can'tthey're going to go out of business,...

...and if that's the fundamental challengethat we have, we got understand how customers decide to buy and I thinkcustomers decide to buy based on the value they get from one product versusthe value they get from ananother product and they compare that to theprice differential of those two products and whatever nets out to bethe best value in use for them. That's that's! Where they're going to go so Imean return that they see from when you say value. So, let's, let's dive inthat just a little bit. It sounds like you're talking about business, thebusiness return of the business value, wouldn't the value that somebody seesvary on their on their role inside of an organization and exactly and that'swhat makes be to be marketing so interested that there are. There is value thataccrues to the organization, and then there are people within thatorganization who may see only part of that value it or it may even be thatthey're pretty their war of an influencer in the purchase, and theywon't personally see any of the value, th they're performing kind of theircorporate duty to point the company, an in the best direction, actually tryingto understand value. We're going to talk. I thinkt we'll talk some a lottoday about understanding value, but it really does have to apply at both theindividual ind, the company level, excellent nd. So all right. So, let'sstart with kind of a contextural example for our listeners. So theyunderstand what we're talking about yourself. You can kind of give us anexample of how an ideal company would approach this, and then we can diveinto some details. Okay, so the customer value leaders do four thingsreally. Well, they the first one is they choose value hen? What I mean bythat is they make it a conscious choice. So much of the value that we delivereda customers today is series of incremental decisions. That may havemade sense at one point in time, but we just kindof muddle through and it's not really taking that step back and thinkingholistically, frequently enough that we are making what I would consider aconscious choice in commitment to a winning value proposition. Okay, thesecond thing they do is they're very good at creating value, and by that Imean they think of both their organization and all the partnerorganizations in their supply chainor in their in their delivery value,dlivery network as kind of one entity, and they figure out if we were all onebig organization, what would be the best way to deliver on this promise ofvalue? And now, how do I create not only the Centis of the customer to buy,but how do I create the incentives for all of these moving parts, some ofwhich I don't have any direct authority over to behave the way I need them to behavein order to fulfil that promise to that end customer. So then, the third thingthat they're really good at is...

...communicating by. So they, if you askthem, what's the value proposition for a product, they don't give you a listof seven benefits. They give you. They stay clearly to three, maybe at mostthree things that are in fact the highest impact sources of value forthat for that target. Customer and they're good at also offering a reasonto believe for that customer that they're going to get that value fromyour offering and the last thing they're really good at is convertingvalue, and I use the term convert instead of capture a lot of people liketo talk about capturing value, but that has kind of a zero. Some game feel tome about it that there's only a certain amount of value there and and it's anadversarial relationship with the customer to figure out who is going tocapture it and I like convert because the term convert, because it's not somuch a zero some game. There may be pricing mechanisms that we can do thatcost us almost nothing and deliver still more value to the customers, sowe're actually pricing in a way that that we are converting value for getting ourfair share of that value, but we're actually growing the pie in the processof managing our pricing. Excellent okay, so that the first one t e consciouseyou're making a conscious choice right. We see there's a lot of talk about thatthese days, but but the vast macurity of organizations, it's probably whatkeeps us both employed, have a tendency to think of themselves. First Right,they focus on products, feel good statements. It's all very you know RaRock, who bout why? Why do you think? Even though the fast majority of Iwould say, you know intelligent for people that I talk to, you understandthat they need to make a conscious choice to focus on value, warmakechange. Why do you think organizations have a tendency to keep falling backinto that Rut of you know, products and features? It's because we start withthe wrong question yeah. So if we start by asking how we're better than thecompetition then features, are the natural responsewe're going to list the things where we actually are better than thecompetition, but the starting question it shouldn't be that the startingquestion should be. What is the customer trying to accomplish and whatrule then could we play in enabling that so we got to get the startingquestion about value to be from the customer tsperspective right off thebet that Abou challenging right like ID be challenging, especially when you'vegot board members and you private equity firms that have invested orexecutives that are all like. You know they're so focused on the numbers. Ithink they sometimes do themselves a disservice. They can't pull themselvesout to understand that a simple change in the perspective of the question canlead to much more impactful results, not only foryour own organization, but for the customers that you engage with right.Well, N, the other. The other thing...

...that you mentioned about going to theother extreme, which, instead of having a very specific feature that everybodycan kind of get their head around. We kind of to fall to these vagueplatitudes like quality and relationship and forse. My favorite, mynew favorite, is complete end and solutions, so these are just empty words. They'vebeen overused to the point that they really have lost their ability toconvey differentiation. But we end up here because it's expedient so gettingto this deeper level of value requires some time in a lot of worthwhileinternal debate. But in a short meeting we can all agree that our product is ahigh quality solution and that we are reliable partners with our customer intheir quest to succeed. So you can quickly agree on some of these vagueplatitudes, because you know who's going to say: Oh well, we want to be alow quality I'nreliable to fire and Andonof. Your competitors are going toclaim bad yeah we're cheaper, but we're really unreliable and we're very lowquality. So you know those kind of empty words are expedient for usbecause we can agree to them, but they're not going to move the needle interms of our sales and marpeting. So so te e, conscious decisions being morepurposeful and slowing down a little bit. It sounds like w. It would beadvantageous for someof h's comings, taking the time to really do the right type of self analysis, aswell as as visionary strategic analysis of where you want to go exactly exactlyexcellent. So when we were going back and forth setting Tus up, you mentionedthree levels where companies need to understand and articulate customervalue, performance outcomes and warth. I was wonder if you break those downfor our listeners, why those areas sure the first though we've got to rememberthet value is a relative term. We can't think about the value of our offeringwithout comparing it to something else, some alternative that the customer haspreferably we're, comparing ourselves to what the customer would perceive tobe their next best alternative to us, because that's really the value we needto be if we can beat the next best alternative, we're not going to anytrouble beating everybody else. So the first thing is, you can't talk aboutvalue on any of the three levels, unless you have some alternative inmind that you about what you're measuring at Batoem, so the most basiclevel of understanding is our performance versus that next bestalternative, but we need to do it across the entire customer journey andwe need to do it from the customers perspective. So most companies arepretty good at understanding the customer journey for the actual productusing the actual product, they've gotten pretty good or better atunderstanding kind of the buying journey, but they still tend to nothave as good an understanding about all...

...the other aspects of the total customerjourney, and we also still have this bias where we end up not reallythinking from the customers perspective. We still phrase the questions andgather the data in a way that it still feels like it's more about us. So mostcompanies are at this first level and they're doing kind of of a spotty job.Some are doing pretty well in some areas, but it's really hard to beneeling this level on all dimensions. So then the second one is okay, sothere's some performance different, so we're better at something. The questionis so what you know? What does that difference? How does that differenceaffect the customer? So we need to understand. What's the outcome for thecustomer of any of these performance differences, because that's really whatthey're focused on they're trying to accomplish some some task or job orachieve some objective? To what degree are we either helping them achieve thatobjective or hindering them in achieving that objective relative tothe other ways that they could be pursuing that objective and the third level is that notonot alloutcomes are equally important, so we need to acsess, preferably in monetaryterms, you kN W. What each meaningful outcome is worth thecustomer and well, we can't put everything into monetary turms, there'salways going to be some intangibles. We want to strive for monetary termsbecause it it basically is the easiest measuring stick that we can use in theselling situation. So if we can get it there, that's that's ideal, and what wefound is that quantifying value in monetary terms is challenging for foreverybody, so otherwise everybody would have already done righ if it were Easyo exactly exactly so. But what we found is that when you getthat right, it really moves the needle it efect. It motivates the customer andit affects your sales. Win Rates, can shorten your sale cycle. Things likethat excellent. So, going back to that performance when we talke abouttraditional market research- and you mentioned personas and journeys andthings like that- I'm curious. You know I've seen a lot of companies spendsignificant amounts of money on efforts to map customer byeur journeys puttogether. You know their types of personas or empathy maps things likethat, but it is, as you said, it is very hard for them to not do it from aperspective that doesn't include them first. So if somebody were approachingthat kind of stuff were conducting at what would you say would be the bestapproaches for doing that so that you could get through performance outcomeinto worth? Yes, we used two different approaches:one for each level, so in terms of...

...understanding outcomes, we prefer touse a more anthropological or ethnographically inspired approach. Soyou know, if you're, trying to understand about the culture of thepeople on an island in the South Pacific, you don't give them a survey,you go out and you live with them and you become part of the culture andthat's how you become that's how we would like to try to become ourcustomer now, unfortunately, we can't just go live with our customer for ayear and internalize everything. That's not going to be practical, so we havewhat we call a day in the life of the customer Aalysis, where we go on siteto the customer, with a crossfunctional team from the client to observe and askquestions of a crossfunctional team of the customer, the clients customer tohelp us better understand what are the objectives in the priorities that theyhave with the customer has and for the most important objectives. We want themto show us how they're trying to accomplish them now and it's not until we understand howthey're trying to accomplish it. What works? Well, it doesn't work well, whatare the consequences when it doesn't work? Well, then, and only then do weask well how does our offering help or might not necessarily help chieve those objectives? N. So, as youcan see this kind of question, he goes back to our original conversation aboutwell to succeed with customer value, you got to start with the rightquestion and the right questions all focus on understanding the customer andwhat they're trying to achieve are the question of how we're performing is thelast thing we asked. Rather than the first thing we asked right right forunderstanding the worth. I use my colleague, Professor JamesAnderson as cousin his customer value, modeling approach. He describes it inhis book value merchants and he's also had in a couple hbrticles that you canread about as well, but here we build a model to estimate the bottom line,impact of those performance, differences that are offering creates.Now this is different from a total cost of ownership study, because in thisapproach we only focus on the points of difference so where our productperforms equally to the next best alternative. We put all that data asideand don't bother gathering t any of it, because the knock Te, not what we foundwith total cost of ownership, is that you've got to get the data for anyimpact that your product could have anywhere in the organization, and thatlist gets really really long and it invites the customers to say you know Idon't have the time I'm not going to participate in this. I don't knaw thetime you're asking for way too much...

...data, so this customer value modelingapproach by just focusing it in on a couple of keypoints of difference. Itallows us to gain the customers, be more likely to gain the customers,participation and not waste everyone's time. Gathering data that we know ifthe performanceis equal we know the differential value is, by definition,going to be zero. So it's really both of these approaches are a process ofjoint discovery with the customer. So we approach them in a way that we'resaying we don't know what the answers are. We've got a way to understand whatyou're trying to do and what the economic impact of getting better atdoing that might be, and we want to explore. You know what thosepossibilities are. They maybe include things that you never thought we coulddo for Ou, and- and that's that you know that's our ideal outcomes fromfrom these kind of efforts uncover something unexpected so sets the stagefor innovation based on the exact real data real day, and I mean I spent thelast ten years of my career, trying to explain to executives the differencebetween ethographic and anthobolotic research. I hope you've, cracked itbetter than I ever did, but once you get them past that point once once theyunderstand that they need to do this research. It really probably should bedone by an outside party that is unbiased. It doesn't bring. You knowthose perspectives that can color create the rose, colored glasses typesof stuff. Once you get them through that point and they get that data, thenwhat's the next step, how do you advise them to take it back into theorganization and make it actionable? Well, the the quick kid is to take yourmost different shape product first just focus on your most different tratedproducts and get this level of understanding, because then you coulduse that information to find Tun your segnentation and targeting because younow know better what drives value for the different types of customers. Youcan use that to focus your communication on what will be the mostmotivating to the customer and improve your marketing sales effectiveess. That way,and last you know knowing what it's worth you may be able to raise price,or at least stand firmer in reducing some of the unmanaged discounting.That's going on longer term. You can feed theseinsights into new product development, customer experience and customersuccess efforts to help them prioritize what they're doing excellent when wework with customers, we talk a lot about the difference between a customerpersona and a buyer personarigh the person, because we focus on stun salesand marketing organizations, but when you're focused on a buyer, marketinghas a tendency to provide all these customer personis right to the salesorganization like Hey. This is how you should approah this person. This iswhat they care about, but it btob especially large go enterprise. Theperson who actually signs a check, probably the last person that ever isgoing to use the product or solution Ih.

They have to gray green light itsomewhere. So I'm curious how you know you would work with er or an able orfocus on that that sales, conundrum of okay, you went out. You did theresearch, we know you know how to do the performance. Out. Comes U worth. Weknow what that is for our organization. How do you then funnel that and fuelthat into a sales organizition, so they're better prepared in their ownefforts to uncover their customers perceptions of value yeah? So the TRIsay couple things: one is to try to drive that alignment in theorganization. These both of these techniques are led jointly by sales andmarketing. So the customer value modeling is a joint effort, the dialovsar a joined effort, and by going to those two higher levels ofunderstanding of value, it drives sales and marketing to get on the same page. In a much morespecific way than they ever have before, so it it forces the organization toagree on what that winning value is for each of those personas iinstead ofsettling for some of these big, vague platitudes or or numbing them, thefuture Andif. You know a if you don't. It's got to be led by the leaders of the sales and MarketingOrganization. If they aren't pushing this and it comes down to how theyspend their time, I mean, if I'm trying to understand, what's important tochief marketing officer Chief Revenue Officer. I don't ask you know what'simportant to them. I ask them how they're spending their time, becausethat's the best clue to me about what they really think is important. So ifthey're not spending their time on making sure that this integration ishappening, you're destined to have a flavor of the month, you're, just notgonna. Do it well, you're gonna not see the results without that sales andmarketing integration. Is that a challenge of like when you go and workwith a new organization or or people come t you and ask for R? For your helpis that one of the first places you look were one of the things. That's onyour you know your checkless to make sure that not only our sales marketinginvolved, but that the leadership is completely behind it and if they're notdo you have ways that you go about, perhaps showing them the value of theinitiative itself? Yes, so that's the single you've Ha ad you've hit on thesingle biggest reason why these kind of efforts failright. The senior vanagement ove seen your managements, not on board, and itreally I singled out sales and marketing, but it really is aprosfunctional requirement for these things to succeed, because a kind ofnew sources of value that you're going to come up with they're not going to bewithin the control of sales and marketing to make happen so and that'swhy we bring across functional team when we do this, this kind of analysis,because we're trying to create kind of a ground swell or bottoms up approachto generating some enthusiasm now. The...

...way that we try to generate theenthusiasm from the leadership team up front is the very same kind of examples that we try to practice whatwe preach h with our Tine. So so we build a business case. We try. Wedescribe here's the steps that you need to go through. Here's the resourcesthat are required ears, what other companies have experienced when they'vedone the same thing and they've really committed to it, including theleadership, and we can also share examples of feeling the leaderships notbehind it. You know we should just walk away because sure we'd like t to havethe fees, but it's just not going to get to the results that you want yeah,which ends up doing nothing but wasting their time, damaging your brand wastingyour time. You know I mean it's just t it becomes a bit of a challenge. I I'veseen a lot of transfer and I've kind of been going on and roun like Dinn aboutthis. Lately transformation becomes kind of the buzz word and everybodywants it, but nobody I'd say executives have a tendency tostruggle with the fact that that means they have to be on boarded and theyhave to ask themselves different questions and take differentperspectives. They have to support it, break down those silos that we so oftensee in those large enterprises and if they're, not behind it. I've just gotto a point where it's like I when you guys are ready. You know where I'm atbut but I'm not. I don't want to waste your time. I don't want to impact yourbusiness in a negative way or quite Franklith, my own brand, if you guysaren going to be completely on board with it, it's a very challenging and Iwould say maybe I'm wrong IFE. It's a defining moment in the relationshipthat you have with your customers. Is that making sure that everybody's inalignment yeah you that's a great great approach to at and and you'reabsolutely right. So all right, let's talk about. Let's Sa we've talked aboutall of he, the kind of the theory of it. We started with the Chemical Company,let's talk about, if you can give us another example of acustomer that had a problem that you're that we're allowed to talk aboutpublicly but at custom had a problem kind of what were those problems? How Dyou engage and work through this with them and what were the were? The netresults kind tof walk us through the that journey of that engagement, suresure we had a medical device and medical supplycompany that was finding that their products were commoditized. Some ofthem were in fact omoditized by themselves. They had light. They hadlicensed out the underlying technology to a competitor figuring that bhackwould they get. You know the licensing fee on all of the sales in the marketby doing that, but now they had a pretty formidable competitor, so westarted one offering at a time- and I think that's kind of this is this ismore of a bottom's up kind of approach. I mean you'll you'll, see a lot ofaporches whereit's analyze, everything in the company first and then startcarving it up from there. We take the opposite approach. We want to create awin quickly, so we take the most...

...different ated offerings. Yea, ourclients are always tempted to say hey, this is a product we haven't been ableto sell or we have to discount heavily to sell. Can you can you work yourmagic on this and I said Wel we have. We have no magic, so that is no. Ifit's my hunch, is it's not differentiated and going through thisprocess. You know we may come up with some new ways of differentiating it andI'll. Give you a quick example of that where we had well, they had contact plates, whichare don't know if you remember, from high school science, little patreedishes, but Yo conor contact plates or basically the same things that theyhave a a medium on already installed on it. So when you place like a sample ofblood onto the plate, it starts to react and it can tell you whether youhave a certain virus or you have a certain bacteria, but no matter who whooffers the contact play. It has to react the same way. Otherwise,we're going to get all sor O contre results, so they had figured. It was acommodity business, we're going to cut cost. They created a new way ofmanufacturing these plates and the lids, but the lids stuck now, so you had topinch them and turn them a little bit to open them up and they thought well,it's ten percent cheaper to manufacture so well share. The savings with thecustomer will cut price by five percent. We went out Wi'vh to industrial labsand found out that they stacked these contact plates ten twenty hot and theyget knocked over all the time the lids come off and the experiments ruined. So it turned out that the consequenceswere the outcome of that of those falls of the contact plates amounted toseventy five percent of the cost of the plate itself, because these were likethe EI lilies of the world. They had to file all sorts of reports. I had toRedo the test, but then they had to file all sorts of incident reports inthe laboratory and had things cleaned and changed and all this stuff. So itwas really really expensive. So, instead of lowering price by five percent, weactually raised it by twenty percent and they still met all their revenue,all their sales targets. So we took that and then we went to anotherinstrument with Ay Instrument, the test of blood and they were using the bag.Whel we're easier to use argument, and we did this analysis for that, and wefound that ease of use in this case meant that a junior technician couldrun the instrument, so it didn't have to be in the microbiology lab, which isa very specialized lab in the hospital he could just be put in the General Lab,which runs in a lot of hospitals. That runs twenty four hours a day, but microonly runs one or two shits today and then you can get the result to thedoctor faster which could get the right medicine, the patient faster, and therewas just tremendous amount of value for...

...getting that instrument out of theMicrolab and but that's what, if you just left it it easy to use. It didn'treally mean anything to anybody. But if you say well, look it's easier to useso now you can move it over there, Youam cheaper person running it, andyou can run at twenty four twenty four seven and lower your length of stat foryour patience now, all of a sudden irs, just dollar bells asns everyhere right.So we just started picking these off and we'v been through twenty plus oftheir offerings and they get dramatic results. T at that's excellent! It'samazing to me, like said, having spent the last ten years, working withexperience a digital experience specifically, but it's always amazingto me how that observational research and really paying attention from anoutside view of, what's going on being, you know, purposefuln and temple howthat uncovers things that many people just don't seem to understand and opportunities that the business candefinitely benefit from. So I'm glad to see that it's producing producingresults for your customers as well. So let's change th direction a little bithere. I ask all of our guests kind of two standard questions towards the endof each interview in the first one is, you know, you're an executive, itactual you O. Obviously, you know have people coming after they want to getinto the university as well. So we like to help our audience understand. Youknow how to be how to effectively capture someone's attention if you wereprospecting to them or er wanted to get in front of them. So, from yourperspective, what's the most effective way to capture your attention or startto build credibility so that a conversation can ensue Woll. Youprobably won't be surprised by this answer on our conversation so far, butyou got only you got O linked it to one of my top party or concerns. There area lot of things that I could be doing right now more efficiently. That wouldsave me time and save me money, but that's not my primary objective rightnow, there's no way, I'm going to save my way to prosperity, ht. I have toalso view the offering therefore is kind of a strategic purchase. If it'snot really very strategic to me, it's really more efficient use of my time tojust repurchase what I've already been doing, and I have to learn something doso: I'm leaving tons of positive roi products on the table because I justdon't have the time to implement them, and it's just not the major focus for me. So if youlinked it to that priority or concern, that's really driving my behavior rightnow. In my where my mind is right now, then the main thing is: I need somekind of proof that the performance is superior and that I could reliablyexpect to experience that from me, excellent okay, and to the lastquestion, we call it our acceleration insight. So if there was one thing thatyou could tell sales marking or professional services, people, onepiece of advice that you think would help them be better, be more effective,beat their targets. What would it be and why don't cut it? Don't cut shortthe understanding and communicating...

...customer value? All the forces inbusiness tend to push you the other way to be quick and to be superficial aboutit, but you have to resist that temptation, because when you understandand demonstrate superior value, you just get dramatic and immediate resultsfrom it. Excellent excellentw, perfect eric the listeners interested intalking more about the topics we've covered today. What's the best way toget in contact with you, but they could connect with me on like din or theycould go to the axies partners website and see what we do there and contact methrough there. That's www xos, ax, IOS partners par TNERS inccom. That's allone word: Dough, puntuationall right excellent. I can't think you enough foryour time today, Thi's been great having it on the show. You're welcomecustomer. As you can tell I love talking about customer, Va Yue. I have a feeling we probably could goon for hours. No doubt no Doub, all right, everyone that does it for thisepisode. Please check us out at BTB. Revizeccom share the Hapsoe withfriends, family coworkers, and, if you like, what you're here and please do,is favorite red review on itumes keep the content fresh and we actually usethat to folks on what types of guests to bring on the show. So until nexttime we value prime solutions with you all nothing, but the best and thegreatest success you've been listening to the BTBrevenue executive experience to ensure that you never miss an episodesubscribe to the show, an itunes or your favorite podcast player. Thank youso much for listening until next time.

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