The B2B Revenue Executive Experience
The B2B Revenue Executive Experience

Episode · 4 months ago

Why More Women Are Embarking on the Entrepreneurial Journey w/ Amy Anderson

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

If you have to step away from your career for a prolonged period of time, do you have a plan for re-entering the workforce? 

For many women, this hypothetical is a reality — and there’s one plan more and more women are opting for… 

Entrepreneurship. 

Today’s guest, Amy Anderson, Co-Founder of Wild Coffee Marketing joins the show to discuss her passion for helping other entrepreneurial women and share her marketing insights. 

In this episode, we discuss: 

- Why the entrepreneurial journey is often different for women 

- The effects of COVID and why more CEOs are paying attention to mental health 

- Why entrepreneurs are well-equipped to handle today’s unpredictable business landscape 

Now that you know more about the entrepreneurial journey for women, are you ready to gain the skills to spot professional sabotage before it happens or employ buyer-first principles in your organization? 

Check out the full list of episodes: The B2B Revenue Executive Experience. 

You're listening to the BDB revenue executiveexperience, a podcast dedicated to helping executives train their sales and marketing teams tooptimize growth. Whether you're looking for techniques and strategies or tools and resources,you've come to the right place. Let's accelerate your growth in three, two, one. Welcome everyone to the BDB revenue executive experience. I'm your host, Chad Sanderson. Today we're talking about the entrepreneurial journey for women and othertopics related to digital marketing, PR and Marketing Consulting. To help us,we have with US Amy Anderson, Co founder of Wild Coffee Marketing, amarketing veteran with experience at Calvinclin and the New York Times Digital Amy, thankyou so much for taking the time and welcome to the show. Thanks somuch for having me, Chad. So we always like to ask a randomquestion at the beginning, just for the audience to get to know you alittle bit better as a person, and I have a tendency to want toknow. I'm very curious about something you may be passionate about that those thatonly know you through work might be surprised to learn about. You well,first I have to say premier league soccer. I would be remiss if I didn'ttell you that my Saturday or conversation. Yeah, absolutely, and yes,I hope everyone watches Ted last so it's great, but I really Saturdayand Sunday mornings. It's such a beautiful game to watch with my children.I love it. With respect to business, you know, I recently started mentoringtwo groups of students on entrepreneurship and I never really considered myself an entrepreneurinto the last few years and now I'm working with university in high school studentsto really teach them about the mindset and sort of what the journey and tailsand getting them excited and I think the world benefits from more of us outthere. So that's been super rewarding. That's amazing. And so when whenthe prep materials for this interview came over, it started to focus on, youknow, Entrepreneurial Journey for women, and I've it seems kind of likethis is going to sound like a dumb question, but I am really curiousto understand how that became such a passion...

...for you. Just said you didn'tconsider yourself an entrepreneur for the last couple of until the last couple of years. So just curious how that all played together and what it's been like.Sure. Well, I you know, a lot of women become entrepreneurs outof necessity. Right sometimes our careers experience a little bit of a break.Some of us were raising children or we may be out of their workforce andwe have a choice when we rejoin the workforce. So we going to goin a salaried sort of work position, in my case, is a CMO, having twenty years behind me, or am I going to start to gointo entrepreneurship? And a lot of us are making that choice. You know, there are thirteen million businesses in the US owned by women, employing ninemillion people, and I think, you know, where the fastest growing segmentof business owners. And I think that our journey is a little bit different. In the past we haven't had the same access to capital. A lotof us have childwearing responsibilities coupled with starting these businesses. So it's something thatI think is sort of unique and new in my life in the last threeand a half years and I'm really intent on sort of mentoring other women andand helping them get started as too, because it's been a one of themore rewarding things I've ever done so well, and you mentioned something I want tojump into their you know, the difference between being a CMO and doingit yourself. There's a there's a big support system that comes in, well, ideally a support system from a company. If you're a CMO, all ofthe things are there. And then the entrepreneurial side. That's a that'sa heavy lift for a lot of people to get it off the ground.Absolutely, but you know what I thought about? I said, you know, I would like to make an impact and more than one company and ifI go and do this on my own, I can sort of have a revertor variety of companies I work with, and then I thought I just wouldhave a little bit more ownership of my own time. Right. Soyou and I talked about when you starting a company it's such a heavy liftthat that's sort of a misnomer, the flexibility aspect. So I don't thinkI didn't know what I didn't know when first starting, but I just feltthat I was in more control of my...

...life and my business and my familyand that it was really important for me to try to do this. Andso when you think about the challenges that you've overcome, kind of how wouldyou lay those out in terms of what you had to overcome or realize inorder to be successful at the entrepreneurial journey? Well, I think a lot ofentrepreneurs maybe identify a cultural gap, a product gap, and and starttheir journey with me. It was it was really exciting to take what Ihad learned for so long and sort of it's almost in a consulting role,sort of mentoring CEOS and mentoring companies on ways that they can really start tobuild their own business. What I had to do is sort of find thatbalance and the confidence right. A lot of times women in business, we've, you know, Cheryl San but Berg wrote lean in for a reason.It's about taking your seat at the table and in many areas of our liveswere often encouraged to sort of be smaller or smaller toward sort of fit intoroles. In this role as an entrepreneur, you have to be big and youhave to be bold and if you're not selling all the time, thenyou don't have a business. Right. Yeah, it's amazing how quick themoney disappears. Oh this is the operational structure that I chose here, RoachMoore, going out and coming in right, you know, but you and that'swhat you know with a lot of people don't understand you can be afantastic in your subject matter area, but you have to be selling your serviceor selling your product all the time and yourself. And that was really newfor me and something that was very eye opening that I didn't realize was goingto be such a big part of it. But it's also something that I've becomequite good at. And so when you think about, you know,the challenges that you've overcome and and the journey that you've taken, how hasthat shaped your philosophies on client engagement or management with some of the people thatyou work with? Well, I think it takes a lot of sort ofwide eyed looking around you all the time, and entrepreneurship is problem solving right atits core. So when you are...

...consistently engaged in solving problems, whetherit's the right employees to hire, how to price your services or your products, distribution strategies, operational plans, it's just constant problem solving. I thinkthat that really that skill set helps us translate when we're doing outsourced CMO services, to be able to go into different companies and businesses and look at theirchallenges and we've really sort of hone that skill set and ourselves and we bringthat to market into our clients really easily. So entrepreneurships and mindset and when you'rein that problem solving mode all the time, I think it makes youreally good at it. It also helps you manage your team better. Ithink you know, when we're looking at what the unique needs are of ouremployees, what challenges they face in their rules every day. Again, problemsolving helps us bring that to the table and be really nimble and trying tomeet their needs well. And that's interesting because you mentioned, you know,when we were talking before we hit record, about dispersed teams, and everybody's probablyexperiencing this to some extent with the pandemic and everything going on. Buthow do you feel like your approach to leadership, especially with differ dispersed teams? I'll get it eventually. This first teams has changed since you have reallyembraced the entrepreneurial aspect of their things. You do differently now that maybe whenyou were working for other organizations didn't crush your mind as a leader or otherinsights that you may have. Well, I think you take it for grantedthat everybody's okay before right. I mean it's really taken us down to thebasics and a lot of ways, you know, I look around every Fridaywe have our team meeting. We have seventeen, eighteen people in that meetingevery week and I really have to look hard at them to look you know, what is it? What can I see in their facial expressions? Whatare they not saying, you know, and really be intentional about how weapproach people on a daily basis just to get them through the basics. Rightnow, one of our earliest and longest tenured employees, you know, covidhappened and she was in a daycare crisis...

...and you know. So we tookher at a part time developed a flexibles, flexible schedule for her. She endedup going on maternity leave. We took care of her during that timeand then encouraged her to take a quarter to come back slowly so she wouldbe okay. So I think you just have to be really intentional and lookat what your team is not saying and really sort of make sure they're takingcare of from a basic level and then from there we are building on careerpath and succession plans and growth and training and fulfillment. But our cultures reallyimportant to us and it's based on kindness and awareness of what your teammates arereally going through right now. I think that's a beautiful point, but Ithink a lot of companies that had never had to think about or really diveinto how are my employees truly doing right how is that a my mindful oftheir true situation as a human being? That I was very rarely part ofthe conversation. I mean I could think back when I was running sales andmarketing teams. We would be concerned about it if somebody we're having a babyor they had something happened in their family, but it wasn't a blanket. Hey, we really need to think about the mental health and wellbeing of ouremployees. Till the pandemic, it's kind of created this shared experience, let'ssay, and I think forced a lot of companies to look at the humanityof their of their practices. Summer adjusting better than others and I'm curious howyou're seeing that play out maybe in your own company or with your clients evenwell, you know, it humanized all of us, right. You know, we talked earlier about the cat walking across the keyboard. I mean it'sit's this is life and and this is work. You know, is ahuge part of that. But to really understand the wellness and mental health.I mean that conversation right in sports right now is very much on the forefront. Why should anyone be any different? These athletes are bringing that conversation onceagain to the forefront. I find them...

...trailblazers on many levels. Right.So I just think that just down to the basics and every single person tounderstand now, with their basic needs arts, it's not just to get the bestout of them as employees. As a business owner, it's to createa culture and an environment where people can work to their fullest potential. Andlet's make sure right on them, aslow's hierarchy of needs, your first couplelevels are taken care of. Absolutely absolutely. So let's kind of transition back tokind of the the topic of the day, the discipline itself of marketing, and I'm curious with the new need for people to be more humane intheir business practices and think about their employees, but also the humanity of their clients. Businesses evolving, changing, responding rapidly based on current situations, andI'm curious when you work with your clients, what are some of the mistakes you'retrying to help them avoid and kind of this new landscape that's so interchangeablebetween humanity and business. Well, one of the things you know, whenpeople are trying to look at cost structures, they look at sort of the GIGeconomy and they say, wait, I may not have an inhouse marketingteam, but I can piece together all of these people and create a cohesivestrategy to grow my company. And we see a lot of times that thereare teams that really don't understand how to manage disparate teams and different freelancers andit ends up being sort of a disjointed strategy that lacks cohesion, and soin the effort to sort of save costs and go to various places, theyend up sort of losing that. I do think that under starting from astrategy that's really geared toward your business goals and then implementing right people just wantto dive in and start marketing and try all these platforms and and all ofthese different services. You really need to start from a strong foundation that istied to your business objectives and then you can move forward from there. Andwhen you when you think about you know,...

...okay, we've got this kind oflevel set. This is what we're looking at from reality situation. Rightnow, nobody knows what's going to happen in the next eighteen months. Imean the lad nobody saw the last eighteen months come. So nobody knows what'scoming in the next a team, how do you help them prepare or approacha mindset that they have to apply to their marketing in their business that's goingto keep them responsive or agile to respond to whatever happens, you know,in the next eighteen or thirty six months? Well, that's such a good question. You remember the days of annual planning? Okay, I remember fiveyear planning. That may make me old, but I remember five year plan absolutelywe have to really think in terms of, you know, six monthin ferments, quarters months and because we have access to so much data now, it's the whole process is so iterative. Right. So we'll look at shortertime periods. Say, these are the five strategies were deploying. Herethe KPIS that were measuring as ourselves against. Here are the multivariates that were usingas part of these campaigns, and then let's look at the data andbe readyady to pivot quickly. And you know we don't want to pivot tooquickly, right, you do need to give some time for some some ofthe campaigns and some of the work we're doing to settle. But I thinkthat the mindset is much shorter term and much more macro focused, right towhat's happening in the environment and be ready to change. We have one clientthat has just rolled up ninety men's formal wear stores under one brand and we'rerolling that out, imagining that happening right before Covid with everything shutting down.Wow. So talk about it's a go ahead. So it's a lot ofchange. I mean it's a lot. It's a lot of change. Haveto look at things completely differently than we did before and I think, honestly, the the whole pandemics kind of pushed everybody to be a little bit morecreative and a little bit more accepting of things that maybe they wouldn't have beenso accepting of in the past. Sure. Well, there's a lack of predictabilityright, you know, even in certain markets and digital you know,we're not sure how covid has really you...

...know, in the environment. Isimpacted pricing results, you know what's happening. So I think that CEOS are alittle bit more open to, you know, testing, moving quickly,trying new things, and we are moving at a very rapid pace right nowtrying to keep up with everything. And, you know, looking forward to twothousand and twenty two. Right it's we're going into fourth quarter. Whatis next year look like? So, so much we don't know. Yeah, the unknown is just now part and parcel of of what we have toaccept as we kind of move forward. I think there were those of us, I think, on the entrepreneurial side, I think speak for my own experience, that unknown was a big change, because the unknown was thirty days out, sixty days out, ninety days out. When you're trying to starta business, your being entrepreneurial, your horizon is much closer and then youget into some of the organizations I used to work for, when we lookat, you know, six months out nine months out, twelve months out, which still was probably folly at that point, but that's what we weredoing and I think that getting comfortable with unpredictability and change. It's just becomenecessary for the DNA of any any company, to exist, but especially in theentrepreneurial environment. Or do you think there's a different way to look atthat? No, I think we're sort of made for it in the entrepreneurialenvironment, right. I mean so much of it is is sort of movingquickly, thinking on your toes, solving problems, identifying needs and and Ithink we're sort of made for this and I think a lot of us havethrived and I think that shows in the numbers of people, you know,starting new businesses and being this environment. It's not the easiest, most predictabletime, but maybe there's never been a better time. Amen to that.So tell us about wild coffee marketing and your journey to arrive there. How'dyou had to end up there, and tell us which guys are focused on. Sure. So, when I started my journey here, I had beenout of the workforce, as I mentioned, for a couple of years and hadto decide really where I was going to take my career and I knewthat I loved this discipline so much and...

I ended up joining forces with somebodyI've worked with WHO hired me at my last position and we've been business partnersfor the last four years. He and I had mostly been on client side, right. So vps CMOS, it's big companies and we really thought thatthere was a need in the market for smaller businesses to have strategy work doneand have an outsource Cmo, because we believe everyone needs one, but youdon't necessarily need it all the time, right. So you may be doingtwenty million thirty million in revenue and have a solo marketing team and person orrunning sort of that function in the company, but you really need to get thatstrategy done. So we started while coffee as an outsourced CMO and marketingcompany so that we're doing that strategy and then whence we have alignment with ourclient, our team can actually implement. So we are like CMOS running ourown agency, if that makes sense to you. Oh Yeah, I loveit. And so I have to ask, because naming is such an important partof any enterprise. Wild coffee, how did we or not? It'sactually I was in Miami, living in Miami at the time when I startedthe company, and wild coffee is a native plant that grew outside my windowwhile I was writing my business plan and it's this really vibrant, hardy whitebeaned plant that I used to have to chop back with machetes because it grewso freely. And I said, what a great name for a company thatit's got. It's energized and really great to look at and has like avery strong growth trajectory, and that's what we ended up naming it. Andyou're always looking for that stopping power. Right descriptive brand names, remember,like S S S, you know, describing what your company does, likeglobal advisors. You know, it's sort of a thing of the past,so I love it. I love all right, so let's change direction herea little bit. We ask all of our guests two standard questions towards theend of each interview. The First Assembly as cofounder and former cm or currencyMOA, that's outsource, you are no...

...doubt a target prospect for people outthere trying to sell things and I'm always curious when they don't have a trustedreferral in what works for you when somebody's trying to capture your attention and earnthe right to time on your calendar. HMM, that is people who havedone their homework a little bit and at least know a little bit about mybusiness and what my potential need is and present it in a very straightforward way. Right. We were talking about a little bit about transparency and and when, when you can identify a potential need of my business and a potential problemthat I may face on a regular business because you really understand what we do, that will catch my attention for sure. Love it all right. So lastquestion. We call it our acceleration insight. There's one thing, justone piece of advice you could tell sales, marketing, our professional services people that, if they listen to that's the cavea you believe, would help themhit their targets and it or exceed them. What would it be and why?We have been talking a lot about this on the team lately and it'sreally about transparency and authenticity. You and I've talked a little bit today justto sort of about covid and peeling back the onion and things being real.You know, when things are high gloss and really sort of high production,sales and marketing. I don't know that people trust that like they used to. I think when you really start to dig in with a pure and honestapproach about, Hey, this is what my company offers, we think youmay have this need, and be very straightforward about that, we are seeingreally good results for our clients, using some artificial intelligence, helping them findprospects that makes sense for them and then hitting them with a message that's justreally honest about the potential need that they may have and how we can solveit. I think authenticity and transparency. So, full disclosure, I'll beone hundred percent authentic for audience here. When I first heard that word,I was an executive for a digital agency at the time and it just kindof hit me wrong because the way it was being used as I oh,be authentic, which as a type a...

...personality, I thought, what thehell does that really mean? However, the transition to entrepreneurial life and reallythe shared experience through that we've all had through the pandemic, understanding that tobe respectfully authentic and consistently transparent are things that, if embracest, to alloweveryone to connect in a much more human and valuable and meaningful way and getrid of some of that Polish. I think I'm with you one hundred percent. I think the overproduction and over Polish just doesn't ring true anymore. Everybody'sgot tattered edges now as a result, and we just saw a need toaccept that right, because selling sometimes has a negative connotation. You know betterthan anyone do you know that I want to be sold. I want tohave as a businessperson, my needs, Matt, and they'll share with youwhat they are and can you meet those needs, and it's sort of strippedaway all of that sort of gloss and let's just be real about what theneeds of our business and what you're selling and how you can meet them.I love it. I love it all right. So, amy, ifsomebody's interested in talking to you more about the topics we've touched on today,where would you like us to send them? Oh Wow, coffee marketingcom or youcan find me on linkedin under Amy Anderson at while coffee. I loveit all right. Thank you, amy, so much for taking time. HasBeen An absolute pleasure to have you on the show today. Thank youso much for having me. All right, everybody that does of this episode.You know the drill be to be REV exactcom share with friends, familyco workers. Let your kids listen to it instead of spending so much timein front of screens. Until next time. We have valiusaning associates with show nothingbut the greatest success. You've been listening to the BB revenue executive experience. To ensure that you never miss an episode, subscribe to the show andItunes or your favorite podcast player. Thank you so much for listening. Untilnext time.

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