The B2B Revenue Executive Experience
The B2B Revenue Executive Experience

Episode · 1 month ago

How to Craft a Truly Data-Driven Culture w/ Nick Amabile

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

You’ve recently purchased some fancy technology that promises to capture all of the data you need to make better business decisions. The problem is, only the IT guys know how to use it — and, frankly, they don’t know anything compared to your sales team about revenue. So, now that technology is just money thrown down the drain, right? Well, what if you could get both teams working together in a truly data-driven culture?

 That’s exactly what my latest guest is here to help you do. Nick Amabile , CEO at DAS42, is an expert on the correct way to integrate data into your organization. 

In this episode, we discuss: 

  • The role data should play in your organization 
  • What it means to have a data-driven culture 
  • The technology that helps you get there 

Now that you understand the role data should play in your organization, are you ready to learn why sales enablement 3.0 matters or finally figure out how to bring up challenges at work? Check out the full list of episodes: The B2B Revenue Executive Experience. 

You're listening to the BB revenueexecutive experience, a podcast dedicated to help in executives traintheir sales and marketing teams to optimize growth, whether you're lookingfor techniques and strategies were tools and resources. You come to theright place. Let's accelerate your growth in three two one: welcomeeveryone to the B tob revenue executive experience. I'm your host ChatSanderson today we're talking about data strategy, modern data governanceand what a data driven culture is everybody's talking about data today, alot of people don't know what to do with it to help us. We have with USNick amable of DOS forty two nick. Thank you so much for taking time andwelcome to the show had great to be here. Thanks for having me, I'm reallyexcited. I appreciate taking the time my friend we always like to start withkind of an odd ball question. Just the audience gets to know you a littlebetter, yeah sure and I'm always curious to know something you'repassionate about that. Those that only know you through work might besurprised to learn. That's good question! I mean I don't know if theteam that I work with would be surprised to hear this, but I'm a bigmusic nerd, so I collect minal records. I live equipment. You know I used toplay the drums. You know I haven't in a long time, but I love music and that'sa that's, a big passion of mine on the side, so favorite genre. Well, so youknow I use actually collect the kind of funk rb soul records from like the Sand S, but I love all kinds of music jazz. You know rock everything, so I'mjust kind of a pot glad when it comes to a kind of comes music. Awesome,awesome man all right. So let's talk data. So we've all heard about theimportance of data. It's every! You can almost open an article without somebodytalking about data government datis trated analytics, but I feel like manypeople, don't really connect dots on how data strategy enables businessdecisions. So can you help the audience better understand it, the role thatdata should play in an organization yeah? Well? Well, maybe what I'll dofirst is kind of just start start by...

...where I see a lot of our customers andclients at Dos Forty, two, where we see them coming to us with differentchallenges, and so I joke with a lot of folks that the job that we do at thatforty two is really about getting people off of spreadsheets and you knowthere's nothing wrong with spreadsheets, but you know a lot of folks even in bigcompanies, traditional enterprises they're still using a lot of manualprocesses, and this is taking up a lot of t of time from high value analysis.It's also prone to error, and there's just you know a pretty big issue of youknow if your spreadsheet says one thing in my spreadsheet says another thingyou know we're arguing about who has the right numbers right as opposed totalking about insights with data, and what should we do about the numberslike you know, okay, what were ours yesterday if I asked ten differentpeople in a company that question I'm going to get ten different answers alot of times, and so it really the challenge is not from a technologicalstandpoint. There's really great software out there, there's reallygreat analytics technology out there. I've seen kind of state of the industryreports and stuff like that. There's literally, like a thousand logos onthis kind of you know, industry map that you've kind of seen this right,and so our customers that we we work with a dusrate to there coming to uswith these challenges, but they don't necessarily know where to start. Theyknow, there's great technology out there, but nine times out of ten. Theseare really organizational challenges that we help our customers with ratherthan technology problems. Certainly, technology is a big enabler and a hugecomponent of any sort of data driven culture, but you know again really it'sthese organization processes that we help our customers with and when, whencustomers are doing it right, witke time. Ah, what kind of impact shouldthey expect to see in terms of the way that organization operates with thereturns at generates or that it yeah? They make yeah really great question,so you know, as I kind of Lude to a second ago those discussions andarguments around whose data is right, whose numbers are correct, those typeof things just kind of fall to the side, and now, instead of talking aboutissues with data data quality, you know. Is this the right definition or ordersor customers or whatever it is that you're talking about those arguments,follow the way side and now we're talking about what do we actually doabout these things? What are the drivers behind these changes in thenumbers? What do we do to try to...

...address? You know market opportunitiesand threats, and things like that, but it's also about getting data toindividuals across the organization, and you know clearly you have in a lotof companies, you have it and other engineering type folks that are verytechnical. They have the skills and capabilities to access date ofthemselves, but it's the people on the front lines of the business, themarketing team, the sales team, the finance team. Those kind of folks oftendon't have the skills to work with data in a very technical sin. So it's reallybad, enabling those folks who are domain experts right. The marketingteam knows the most about marketing and sales team knows n't the most about thesales team are sales in a company. So it's really about how to be enablethose folks to ask and answer their own questions without being limited by it.Ban with and things like that, and so, if a company you know, companiesprobably have more data than they're, even aware of yeah, frankly Vertano thesystems that they're running, if all of a sudden they just said okay, I reallywant to make it a focus to create a dated driven strategy. Where do theystart yeah? It's good question. I mean, like I kind of said at the top of theshow here. A lot of people are already working with data and numbers, but thenthere witin an organization and often times what we see is that there's thesedata silos. So especially in the days of soft wars of service applications,you know every business is being run by ten. Fifteen different applicationscould be sales, for US could be Google ads whatever it is. So what we see alot of times as folks literally logging in these platforms, downloadingdisparate datasets, combining them in excel those type of things. So really,what it's about is centralizing your data first and foremost, and anautomated fashion, so that kind of manual prep work and that manualinformation retrieval goes away and then the data is fresh right. In otherwords, you know we're not looking at data from two weeks ago or three weeksago or last month, we're looking at data for like yesterday or today or nowright, so decisions are able to then be made in a much more informed fashion.You know, based on fresh data, automated data now we're not doingmanual retrieval and then also the other piece is having a standardizedset up definitions so that when you're...

...talking about revenue and I'm talkingabout revenue, we know what we're talking about right. So should revenueinclude tax or should it include shipping right? How do we deal withrefunds? And this is all stuff again? That's not really a technological issue.It's basically like you and I having to agree on what we're talking about, andso that's the the day the governance peace comes in, and that's really whatwe help our customers do is roll out these day to governments, programsdefine their metrics and definitions for dimensions and other things likethat: standardize those definitions in a way that's automated and sort oftrusted and then getting the data to everyone in the company so, like I ledit to a second ago, getting the data to the front line folks on the business sothat they can ask and as their own questions, and so when a company hasthat in place and they have near real time. You know twenty four hours andthen right near real time data to make those types types of decisions it hasto impact culture in some regard- and so you know you mentioned in our prep,you know data driven culture. He plus I'm packed that a little bit yeah. It'sreally good question I mean so so. Here's an example that we actuallytalked to a customer of ours recently, and this is relevant to the sales folkswere listening a lot of times. You know sales person is calling it a customer.They may be looking for a renewal or cross sell or you know up, sell typesituation, and you we've heard of sales folks calling on customers and thengetting blind sighted that the customer isn't happy. Maybe they have like tenfifteen different support tickets that are open right. So you know, if I'm thesales person, I call up the customer. I'm like Hey, you know: Are youinterested in XYZ up so cross o whatever it is the customers like? No,I'm not. I'm really upset right, because I have these support ticketsthat are open and then, of course, the sales person is just surprised andblind sited by that, and that's not a great experience for the customer isnot a great experience for the sales team. So, for example, what we've beenable to do with a lot of our customers as create what we call customer healthdashboards. It brings up all the information that's irrelevant to acustomer on one screen, so it's like support. Tickets contract renewal dates,usage of a product if it's like, maybe a SASS company that we've worked with,show all their product usage data when...

...the last time they've logged in allthese types of different things that you know are relevant to the to thesales person when they're calling on this account- and you know thatbasically then saves that customer or that sales person from getting blindsited by these different issues that maybe are there and so they're able tobe proactive and we're able to set up like automated alerts. For example thatsay: Hey this person has ten open support tickets. You should call onthem and make sure that they're getting their concerns addressed or hey. Thiscontract is coming up for renewal on ten days and they haven't logged in,and you know ninety days or something like that. So, having that proactiveinformation really starts to drive that behavior and really just leads a betterbusiness outcomes because like for example, if the sales person has thatinformation at their finger tips, they're going to be able to moreeffectively, you know sell or make sure that the customer is successful withthe product that they're selling absolutely, and so we think about datanalytics. There's a lot of agreement. Em. What you know the data set is howit's compiled that type of stuff. A lot of people don't spend time thinkingabout that stuff, but the end o access to it. They need access to the results.You're talking about that customer health profile or read out. Does thatenable self service in a Linin? So if I'm somebody who doesn't have the youknow data strategy mindset, but I need of the numbers, I can go some place andjust get the information. I need to make the decisions and not bother it,help help kind of yes that out a little bit yeah. That's that's really the goalright and I mean you know the there's great technology out. There werepartners with looker, which is a self serve bee tool, but there's plenty ofother bi tools out there that really enable folks to kind of slice and dicetheir numbers drill down generate their own reports, their own dash boards. Soit's a true self service model, but with the self service model comes likeyou're kind of talking about it. I needn't understand what I'm looking at.I need to understand what these numbers mean and kind of what you know. Whatthey're telling me, and so that's kind of around data literacy that we workwith our customers on. There are things like data catalogues, that sort of pairsome of the technical information around data with the businessdefinitions. So, like that's, really, the key thing that that we like to dowith our customers has set up these...

...kind of programs that you know coverdata quality. They cover get a catalogs that cover data lit literacy. We alsodo a ton of training, an enablement with our with our customers, so inother words, we'll need to sit down with the sales team and walk themthrough that customer health dash forward, and we need to make sure thatall these things that that they would expect to see, we need to work withthem to understand what that is, and also making sure that we're talkingabout the right labels for things- and you know we need to really understandtheir business process first and foremost before we can go just creatingan it solution. A Lot a lot of times, we've come into places with failed data,analytics projects, it's typically because it's been driven from it andnot from the business. So that's the number one. That's the number one rulethat I will so to say for success for these kind of projects as start withthose business use, cases first and then work backwards from there. If you,if you're doing it from a technology standpoint, often times gends updelivering less value to the business than you might think, absolutely, andso there's also interesting challenge around, not necessarily from aninternal standpoint, although I guess you could argue with his but dataprivacy for your customers and and the changing regulatory environment. Youknow gouos decision to change way. They handle cookies and things like that,enabling CD P platforms and things. So how do you, when you look out acrossthe horizon a what's the future of data analytics look like? Is it going to beanother industry where it is just in a constant state of change, and there hasto be somebody focused on ensuring an organizations and compliance in termsof how they're collecting analyzing or applying their data, or is theresomething on the horizon that will help stabilize it a little bit yeah? It's agood question I mean. Certainly we've always had to consider even before therecent regulations have come into effect, we've always had to considerdata access and privacy. I mean we work with very large public companies, forexample, and there's obviously lots of non public financial information thatfolks have access to, and so we always have to consider who should get accessto what what level of access they should have, and so that's somethingthat we always work with our customers...

...around. In terms of some of the youknow more recent impacts, like you mentioned, the Google cookie policychanging and things like that. I mean that's, that's very difficult, I meanthere's. Obviously no one can predict kind of the regulatory environmentgoing forward and you know by no means are we sort of lawyers or legal folks.So you know we mostly take our customers sort of regulatory posture ina consideration, but they have to drive that for us and you know we're able toimplement it on a technical standpoint but, like I said we always have toconsider any to access date of privacy. We do a lot of work to you, knowanonymized data for our customers that they're able to have, for example, verydetailed level of data, but it's an appropriate level that doesn'tnecessarily reveal personally identifiable information, for example,and they're able to do the analysis that they want to do, but you know sortof still maintain an appropriate sort of: U N W Security and privacy posturein terms of kind of the future. I think of the industry. I mean certainlythere's there's a lot of change and there will be, but I think we you knowat the end of the day, the strategy that we employ is kind of technology,exhaust agnostic. Really it's about. You know centralizing your data,standardizing it with a kind of semantic layer as we call in thebusiness and then also getting data to every everyone in the company. So sothat strategy, I think, is tried and true and look to continue to work goingforward. What we start to see a little bit more mature customers. Ask Us for,is you know? Okay, let's say we got our data in a data warehouse and we got aBi tool that lets the sales team have that customer health. You that I talkedabout. For example, now customers are asking US okay. What else can we dowith our data? And now it's talking about? We start to talk aboutactivating on data, so getting data to your email service provider, so you cancreate customized, personalized emails and getting it to push notificationsother types of activation that you can do even putting things like creatingapplications with data that allows folks within a company to have a verycrated specific experience to what they're trying to do and inserting datainto their every day. Work Flows. I think you know machine learning, AI,that stuff still a little bit further out on the time horizon. I think mostof the customers that we're working with and a lot of things that we see inthe industry are still just getting the...

...basics down. So I think, there's stillyou know three to five years of companies still adopting a lot of thesetechnologies and really creating a mature kind of you know: Dat AnalyticsProgram at the first level and then from there starting to build outapplications on top of data activating on the data and then eventually we'llget to machine learning. Eventually I love it when people, you know howthere's artificial intelligence in there uh, let's have a conversationabout what that really yeah, I'm a naturally skeptical person, soI'm always a little bit skeptical of that. But you know you see it on. Youknow I watch a lot of golf and you know they have a lot of you know: Enterprisetype, Ai things out there on the advertisements when you're watchinggolf, but you know, I think the truth is a lot of people are still just hadsquare one and there's a lot of work to still do to get to get folks to thepoint where they're able to embrace those type of new technologies- and youknow from a consulting perspective, that's really what we help ourcustomers do is understand. The Art of the possible right and say, okay,what's possible, where is the cost of benefit and impact your businessmakessense to actually do some of these initiatives? You know it's not just A.I is one one thing and machine learning is one thing: it's going to be manythings, and a lot of folks are still going to have to figure out what is theright sort of mix of software versus you know, services, forces, internalresources to go capture these initiatives, and where do we actuallyapply data so to the business to actually get outcomes so that that'ssomething that I think folks will continue to need help with all right,love it. So now, we've gotten a good sense. I think, of what DOS forty twodoes help us understand how you arrived. How do you arrive? There? Is the CEOyeah? It's good question I mean like I've, been in the industry for a longtime, so I was most recently the head of business intelligence at JATCObefore they sold to Walmart and held senior anlage rolls at at c. So I'vebeen on the other side of the table and not as just as consultant but as apractitioner, and I mean believe me- I have learned lessons the hard way andmade my head against the wall like a lot of our customers have, but I thinkwe've been able to I've been able to kind of you know, be a little bit o anearlier adopter on some of these technologies methodologies. I'velearned a ton over my career and really...

...just wanted to share those lessons withother folks and try to save them. A lot of the headache that I experienced sostarted the company back in two thousand and sixteen and you now havegrown it since then, but really my passion has always been. You know ananalytics and data and helping customers solf problems with date andtechnology, and so I feel lucky to be able to do that on a day to day basis.Now so and as you lead the team and you know,focus on the business. What's your strategic business objective for D,forty two yeah, so I mean, I think, there's a really great opportunity. Imean LE, like I said, before, a lot of people out. There are struggling withthese kind of things and, like I said, my passion is to help folks off thoseproblems and I think there's a great opportunity to go. Do it. I mean we'reexclusio focused on modern cloud technologies when it comes to date, ananalytic. So I think that's a little bit of a different shater for USrelative, some of the bigger consulting firms out there. So I think we have agreat opportunity continue to grow the business. We just receive some privateequity investment earlier this year or partners with snow flake and thatecosystem is growing really really fast. So you know our goal is just to keepdoing what we're doing- and you know, hopefully, in the next few years, we'llbe able to grow the company to somewhere around two hundred and fiftypeople and, I think, fill a gap in the market place, because you have the bigconsulting firms that aren't necessarily focused on the newertechnologies. They have sort of a different service model than we do so.I think we're able to be agile and really expert and the technologies thatwe support, so we're going to continue to grow the business and just kind ofdouble down on what's working, so we're really excited to go. Do that awesome?So, let's Change Direction here, a little bit. We ask all of our guess twostandard questions towards the Indovar interview. The first is simply as a CEOthat makes you a prospect for a lot of people out that and I'm always curiousto know when somebody doesn't have a trusted, referral or reference into you.What works for you in order to capture your attention and earn the right totime on your calendar. Yeah. That's really good question I mean you knowsure point I do get it up a lot by different services and vendors andthings like that. You know a part of me. I was kind of thinking about this andyou know before the interview here and-...

...and I think has to release. You knowsolve a problem that I have I mean I know that's. Obviously it sounds sortof intuitive, but, like the other day I was thinking of a man. We really havethis issue with you know whatever it is. I can't even remember, but I had thisproblem. They were wrestling with internally and then I got. I got aemail message from some service and I was like actually this might. This isrelevant to what the problem I was trying to solve. So I think you knowthe thing like that I've noticed is that a lot of folks are trying tounderstand where we are as a company and what problems we might have. Youknow I think, a lot of services providers out. There are vendors, theyhave kind of a customer journey map and things like that, so catching us at theright time with the right sort of solution really does work well, buttiming is everything right, so understanding, hey, we just raisedprivate eue investment, for example. We might be growing so we need recruitingservices like that's, that's a good. You know a good bet right and certainlywe are trying to grow. So we do need recruiting services, for example. Soit's just finding the right message at the right time and solving an actualproblem, and I also provided a little bit more differentiation. I meanobviously there's like a million recruiting services out there, forexample. So why is your service different or those type of things? It'sgot to be some sort of Hook. That's going to be like okay. Maybe that issomething that I'll check out. It's a little vague, but you know anyway. No!No, it's a great it's a great point. It's a great point and well stated, Ithink so last question: We call it our acceleration insight, one piece ofadvice, only one that you could give De Marketing sales professional services,people anybody that you believe would help them hit their hit where exceedtheir targets. What would it be? And why well of course, coming from a dataperson, it's great a holistic view of your company and your customer. That'ssuper critical. I think that Customer Health Dash for that I talked aboutbefore something like that is super critical, and you know that is, I think,the simplicity of that concept of the customer House to Health Tash Board isbelied by a lot of complexity underneath that, so you know, that'sreally the key and getting all your data sources together in one place,merging them, creating a Hollis view of your customer holistic, a few of yourcompany, you know tying marketing, for example, marketing spend to outcomesand customer success and other things like that. You really can only do thatwith a you know, a pretty robust date,...

...analytic solution, so I'm a littlebiased there, but certainly that's that's what that's what I would sayawesome. I love it all right, nickals, ners, interested in talking more aboutthese topics were reaching out to to learn more about. Do Forty two: Wheredo you want us to send him? What's the best place? DASOR com certainly is agood place to start my emails also just nick it. That's Forto so feel free hitme up directly, all right man. I appreciate it. Thank you. So much fortaking time today my pleasure chat thanks for a me on really enjoyed it.Talk to you soon, all right, all right, everybody! You know the drill. Does itfor this episode is up a B to be re Zacchary with friends, family coworkers leave us to review. If you like what you hear, and until next time wehave value selling associates with well nothing, but the greatest success. You've been listening to the B TBRevenue Executive Experience to ensure that you never miss an episodesubscribe to the show and Itunes or your favorite podcast player. Thank youso much for listening until next time.

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