The B2B Revenue Executive Experience
The B2B Revenue Executive Experience

Episode · 9 months ago

An Insider’s Guide to Starting a Podcast w/ Zachariah Moreno and Rockwell Felder

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

A few years ago, it was totally fine to have the sound of someone doing dishes in the background of your podcast (true story). 

Today, not so much. 

Recently on B2B Revenue Executive Experience, I chat with SquadCast founders Zachariah Moreno and Rockwell Felder,
about all things podcasting. Zach and Rock tell me all about how
expectations have changed recently and advice for getting started in
podcasting. 

What we talked about:  

  • Changes in the podcasting community 
  • Quality plus reliability equals credibility 
  • 3 places to focus when getting started 
  • How to think long-term with your podcast  

This post includes highlights of our podcast interview with Zachariah Moreno and Rockwell Felder at SquadCast. 

For the entire interview, you can listen to The B2B Revenue Executive Experience. If you don’t use Apple Podcasts, we suggest this link. 

The most common one we see is like fora business to connect with their customers to connect with theiraudience and share value and insights that are kind of around the topic thatthe challenge that the company helps their customers solve and that'ssomething we've seen be very, very valuable. You're listening to the BTB revenueexecutive experience, a podcast dedicated helping executives, traintheir sales and marketing teams to optimize growth, whether you're lookingfor techniques and strategies were tools and resources. YOUV come to theright place. Let's accelerate your growth in three two one: welcomeeveryone to the btob revenue executive experience, Ome, O your host ChatAnderson Today, we're talking about podcasting seems, like everybody, hasone of these days from Dack to Joe Te, countless ones on sales and market and,of course, the best one out through this one. But the question becomes: Howis the TECH EVOLVED? How does it make us more effective? What role should apodcast play in growing your business in total, or should it to help us wehave with as Zach Morino and rockfelder cofounders of squad cast? Thank youboth for taking time and welcome to the show, thank you for having a Sanchat,really appreciate it. Awesome thonk you but efore we jump in. We always like toask this random question just for people to get to know you and wouldlove to understand from EA Yo. You kind of one thing you're passionate aboutthat. Maybe our listeners might be surprised to learn exact, Yu goint tojump in first, I think for me my passion is summed upin helping people express their creativity, and you know I've alwaysfound that you add collaboration to that creative process and and kind ofamazing. Improved things happen. So that's what really feels my passionlove it and how about you, rock yeah. My passion personally is you know,aside from all the things is ack said I love working at squadcast and helpingpodcasters and content creators, but I'm also a big fan of physical fitnessor physical IQ or physical qe. If you...

...will so one of the big things I like todo is train martial arts, specifically Brazilian Jujitsu. So that's like a bigpassion of mine in Addito podcasting Nice do y ever get intoto crossfittingat all. I did so that's what started my journey so to speak. Was I've alwaysbeen into like lifktin weights and stuff, like that, but crossfit reallyexpanded my way of what exercises like and incorporated stuff like kettlebells and rope climbs and all that stuff an the gym. I went to also had aBrazilian Jujitsu class, and so one of my friends was like hey: we should tryout briziing Jujitsu, it's really cool, I think you'd like it, and I didn'ttake him seriously that we would actually follow through and did it andfrom the first class that we did. I was like I was terrible. You know and I wascoming from crossfit, so I thought I was in shape, but was getting tossedaround like a ragdoll from people that were much smaller than me and was like.I want to get better at this. This seems like a lot of fun and it's been ahuge passion of mine. Ever since Yeah Buddy of mine signed us up one time todo. Krabmaga- and I think I think I thought he did it because we were- wemight have been having some- we probably were having some drinks, and Ithought he did it. Just as like a you know. Oops I signed us up. Man Got mybutt handed to me. Yes was not prepared for that and Zact did I hear you Sayas?We were warming up, you taught it cow Berkeley, yeah yeah. I did a full stack webdevelopment boot camp at cow Berkeley in San Francisco, Nice Excellent, allright, gentlemen. Well, I'm looking forward to this conversation, obviously,because we're on a podcast but squadcast has been around for aboutfour years and it seems kind of interesting. I'm always curious. Whatinspired you to get into the market because, four years ago it was itwasn't, as I wouldn say, as in the spotlight, as I feel like it has beenthe last two. So I'm curious what really you know? What was the impetus?What was the inspiration? Yeah a lot of startups talk aboutpivoting and for us it was. It was a...

...pivot, but it wasn't from from like apath. Start up to to what we do now, it was more that we wanted to do acreative side project and collaborate on that that podcast we wanted to do ascience fiction, audio drama, because we thought that that would be withinour skills and and would be fun and to try something new and we lovedlistening to podcast for years before that, because of our our love forlearning rock actually introduced me or longtime friends from high school. Heintroduced me to podcast as a listener, so fast forward a couple of years, andwe decided- let's try to make our own and have some fun with somestorytelling through audio and the catch was that we were a remote teamlooking to collaborate on very high quality production and that reallybecame the barrier. The bottle neck to US doing. That project was being ableto capture high quality audio without being in the same room, and that reallywas discouraging at first and kind of a real bummer like this might not happen,and that really became the the catalyst for the the idea behind squadcast as itis today. So we really just dug into that that challenge that we faced, westarted researching and listening to the podcast community and what peoplehad been doing to overcome those challenges before seeing if people werehappy with the state of the art so to speak and also being a full stock webdeveloper and software engineer started, putting together some pieces about howwe could sollve this longtime problem with with a real new approach of newtechnology. Well- and I have to say both of you- have the highest quality,Mikes and best siunding audio of anybody I've had on this year, so webetter quite a compliment. Thank so and it's not easy quality. No, it'snot, and and it's funny it takes a lot, even though you know, as you saw in theemail that I sent in advance a lot of our guests. I wouldn't say today, butmaybe the first year so weren't familiar with the medium, and so we hadto give pretty specific instructions on how to kind of minimize the crap audioor the background noise or somebody...

...doing dishes. Actually, I think one ofour early episodes somebody was recording in a kitchen while somebodyelse was doing dishes. So if you listen carefully, you can hear somebody doingdishes in the background and that kind of quality was okay four years ago, buttoday there's a higher level of expectation in the production that goeson. To I mean I'm a huge, I have a tendency to listen to really darkpodcast me that says too much about me, but like the one on the black Dalliamurders and down the hill, and now I'm into somesomebody somewhere and all about the the? U: A USA's murder up in Seattle inNineen, two thousand and one so just those kind of productions they justsuck you in it's kind of like the old radio productions and so that change inaudio rit quality is definitely one of the changes we've seen. But I'm curiouswhat else have you seen change in the in the podcast community and orexpectations from listeners, since you guys found at squadcast well you're,absolutely right, Chad that four years ago the space was pretty prettydifferent than what it is today, which is really exciting? A lot ofdevelopments happened in the last two years and when we first entered thespace like Zack said, we stumbled upon this problem a trying to create apodcast, but we realize that there was no industry standard for when it cameto recording a podcast remotely, and so we really saw squodcastes theopportunity to provide that to the community, because not everybody'sgoing to have the ability to meet in a studio or be in the same room to recordthat conversation and but they're still going to want to have that conversation.So squadcast is really that cloud studio experience but you're right whenwe first started like quality was a debated topic of. Is it even worth theeffort? Is it? Is it? Do you eve? It doesn't matter, and you know we said.Yes, it does and if it doesn't matter now, it will matter later because, aspodcasting gets more mainstream and generally recognize, quality is one ofthe things that is in the creators, control that can separate them from therest of the podcast in their category. So why would you not try to setyourself apart and now with more...

...listeners listening to shows theexpectations for quality is just gone higher as well. So it's been anexciting development where really happy that people are. You know kind ofsaying the same things that we've been saying for four years, where it's notlike this uphill debate of does quality matter. It's like everyone kind ofagrees that quality is important and I think it's a lot of it's our duty as acompany in the industry just to educate people and how to do that. It doesn'thave to be complicated, but there are a few steps and a few things that weencourage t e the podcaster and encourage their guests to holdthemselves accountable for I to endsure that they have a really good experience.Yeah. When I, when we started this one three years ago, I knew Jack aboutpodcasting right. I had listened to him. I knew I would listen to the ones thatsounded good in the ones where the audio were was crapped. I kind ofturned off and mistakenly thought that I could read an article online andfigure out how to do this myself and that failed, absolutely miserably soI've in order to get the quality on ours. I work with an outside agencybecause a lot of other things I have to do w th with the business, but thereare, you know, emerging competitors for squadcast other technologies that areout there and I think it creates, especially for me even as a podcast, soit creates a confusion on what the hell should I be doing or shouldn't. I bedoing what separates one thing from another, so when you think aboutsquadcast kind of in the market that you're in what is it that you feel likeseparates your approach to helping people create the content versus others? Yeah lots of things. I think it's afocus on the things we've touched on already. You know an emphasis onquality and I think, to you know, to add to the Great Answer: Rock gave it'sthe collective professionalization of podcasting and you see that across thedifferent categories within within podcasting, ours included. So so Ithink that's a really good trend that speaks to the sustainability and youknow just the awesome possibilities...

...within podcasting. But to answer yourquestion about about our focus and how that helps us differentiate for ourcustomers and and therefore for their listeners, and their show, experienceis, is really this emphasis on on two things: it's how we capture the quality,but you know, even if I could tell you chat, like here's, the best soundingversion of yourself possible. If you never actually got that file because Isent it to you, but it it got lost in transit like that would be a realDowner right. So I think it's really the other side to the coin. Is thereliability so making sure that we can capture this really uber soundingawesome quality source audio from you and your guest? Usually podcast hostssound great, but their guest, like you, said with the dishes. Their guest willsound less than great or the the listener has no choice but to startcomparing the audio quality between the two speakers or three speakers- and you know there are studies on howthat impacts, people's perception of credibility and, if you think about whywe talk to podcast guest, it's because theyre experts, they have somethinginteresting to say they have influence. They understand something very deeplyand you generally want that person to come off as credible. So if qualitystarts to kind of work against that credibility, that can really impact howyour listener actually walks away with the message that that you are sharingin that episode. So we focus on those two things. Above all, elseis is makingsure that we're capturing the the best quality possible to give you and yourcreative team, all the creative possibilities in post production to cuttogether a really great sounding episode or just publish it straight up,because it's good enough without editing. You have you have flexibilitywith recording with us. So the reliability piece, though, is reallywhat has led to some intellectual property to patents pending that werevery proud of, and that is really how we upload the audio in a very reliableway. So we call that progressive,...

...upload or you can think of it kind oflike a cloud auto save, while you're recording, in the background, we'realready recording that audio, but also uploading it in the background, andthat really gives us. You know both quality and reliability and and thenbeyond that, if you record everybody in separate tracks like we do on squadcast,this kind of Meta issue can arise. That is probably vocabulary that most peoplearen't familiar with, and that's that's, okay, we're trying to eradicate it and that's this problem of audiodrift,where the timing of people's tracks, their audio, can start to slip out ofsink from one another and us, as creative professionals end upwasting more time or spending more time or paying our our cre. You know ourpost production team more to fix these problems that shouldn't be there in thefirst place, so with squadcast you're, always going to get your audio andit's,always going to line up and sound great excellent. So when somebody starts tothink about a pockest because again ever it seems like every time I turnaroun so as go. I should do a podcast on this or podcast on that, and the thetopics are endless. I mean, if anybody's ever gone to look. You canliterally get lost looking at different topics out there, but I think whensomebody goes to start a podcast, they really have to have a foundation ofkind of what's their goal. So, aside from you know, the quality obviously,which is you know, we all agree- is critical. What three things would youtell somebody to focus on if they were planning on starting a podcast today,yeah? Well, I think one of the the top ones that I kind of see happen a lotthat we is more so of what not to do so. It's not spend too much time justfocusing on the equipment or just really like you said earlier Chad like there's,there can be a lot of confusion, there's a lot of information out thereand it can kind of be. You can kind of get decision fatigue from that, and sowe see podcasters kind of not get started because they're so focused onthe equipment or the th. The software, and so the best thing you can do isjust get started. I mean sure a microphone is definitely going to makeyou sound better n than not recording...

...with the microphone, but it's onlygoing to get you so good. The best thing that you can do is create contenton a recurring basis and just just continue to do it and you will getbetter a d. You will start to grow an audience start to build influence. Soyeah, that's one of the one or two things out of the top three. You gotanything else for the folks here, Zack Yeah. I think I think it's somethingwhere there's all sorts of ways and that somebody can add value with thepodcast and I think, setting setting that upfront intention can really behelpful, because I think a lot of people get discouraged when they see.Oh, it's going to take time to grow an audience, and it's like compoundinterest is with investing. So that's really where setting clear goals andmilestones upfront as to what you want to get out of your podcast. What youwant other people to get out of your podcast, I think making decisionsthrough the Lens of what's best for your audience. andbest for yourlistener is, is always a North Star that I recommend podcasters makedecisions through because otherwise it can get into you know my guest or me ormy team and all of those roles matter all those people you know, contributeto the to the production of the content, but it's at the end of the day. It's aproduct, that's for our listeners, so I think that that's really good tooptimize around and and then also you know. What are you getting out of it?Like is it part of Your Business and it's going to feed growth there? So if that's the set up then- and we seethat a lot- it's not really about monetizing the content itself, yourit's feeding into Your Business, which is somehow you know, adding valuethrough a product or service, so there's all sorts of ways to thinkabout monetization, even but, if you're, just starting out, I think you knowmonetization shouldn't really be part of the conversation. Like start withthe foundation of really great content and, like rock said, the the habit ofrecording on a regular cadence is super important to audience growth. If youget those two things down, then you can start kind of think about. Okay, how DI improve from here- and you know,...

...there's all sorts of it's, not all solver and gold right!There's e Socia, there's social equity, there's lifting up other people'svoices and helping share their story and helping others. So if you're clearon what you want your outcome to be, then you're not going to bedisappointed that you're, not like Jordan, harbanger or something likethat right with with these with these addeals. That's one path, that's oneway to go, but there there are many paths that all are successful forpodcasters. Well and let's talk about that versiing, because when we startedthis podcast our goal was to it was. It was honestly it was to help feed myhead, because when I started my business it was, I knew I was going tobe too busy to read as much as I had or meet with other professionals. As muchas I had, I knew I was going to have be focused laser focusd on gettingthebusiness off the ground, but I still didn't want to give that up. So thepodcast seem, like you know, Wen wiin situation. I could. I could have guestson. I could feed my head and then, if it provided content value for thelisteners of a certain ilk, then that would be great. We also made thedecision very early on not to monetize the PODCAST. We made the decision andwe don't. We don't have advertisers, we don't work to monetize the PODCAST. Ittruly is kind of evolved into a opportunity for us to share insightsand thought leadership from other individuals for our audience, but thereare people that want to get into it to monetize it and I'm curious. You saidyou know, don't worry about that at first. How do you know when they shouldstart to monetize it and what ways could they? I literally have no idea,because I've never even thought about it. Yeah and there's some decisions. Youcan make upfront that give you that optionality. I think. That's you knowsuper important. A lot of people think about one of the first choices, Hapodcaster Makeis like okay. How am I going to host my podcast and that wordin our community has many meetings. It's almost demeaned, but hosting inthis case is like the media host. How do I actually get my audio onto the webso that people can listen to it? You know, and and people can get hung up onjust that decision right there, but I...

...think one thing that is, you want to beon the lookout there for- and it's also to my point before about the collectiveprofessionalization of podcasting- is when we first started out there wasthis big questionmark about how do we even measure who's listening to podcastand how is that measurement? How how do those analytics help me? You know get these ad relationship sothat I can have that style of monetization and that's something thatwe've seen evolved tremendously when it comes to a standard. The IAB tostandard has emerged for media hosting companies. So, if you're making thatdecision and just starting out your podcast like just make sure thatwhatever host you're using complies to that standard, and that's really goingto set you up for success so that in the future you will know hey. I havethis many listeners and at a point I think those listeners who areinterested that that number of listeners who are interested in my veryspecific Nich topic are very valuable. To you know the spirit company or, toyou know this this other company or this this agency can help connect mewith companies that I think, would would really value the connection withmy listeners. I think having that data is a prerequisite, so just kind ofhaving that, in your mind, for the long term is a really great way to setyourself up for success. So you have that optionality. You may choose youknow a few months into the journey not to monetize it or that it's reallygoing to be patreon. That's going to be your style of monetization, there's,actually a bunch of different ways to think about that. The most common onewe see is like for a business to connect with their customers to connectwith their audience and share value and insights that are kind of around thetopic that a challenge that the company helps t their customers solve andthat's something we've seen be very, very valuable and I think a strategy,that's kind of less talked about okay,...

...and so what about? What about videoswith podcast recording a video I mean we've seen some of that increase. I don't know wh, we don't do it becausewe're not putting this up on youtube or promoting the video in other ways, butkind of what are you seeing or what do you recommend when people think aboutthe video aspect of it? Should it be there shouldn't be there, becausethat's another area of quality that adds another realm of cavattes andchallenges yeah. So actually there's a videocomponent to squadcast currently, and we just felt like it was important towe wanted to give our customers the option to see their guest or cohost,because we felt like it helped build raport and just addid to theconversation that the listeners were hearing. But, as you can imagine,customers are very happy with the audio recordings are getting from squadcastand they're. Saying Hey, there's video here too, like I could actually reallyuse the video feed and that wasn't necessarily intuitive to us asoutsiders, because we thought okay, their podcasters they're focused onaudio. That's all that they're really going to want as far to publish, butwhat we found is that there's so many different use cases for incorporatingvideo into your show and Seeng it more as a show, not just a podcast. It's thepodcast may be the the entree or the main focus of their content production,but using the video to promote on social media or to add to Youtube,which is a very popular search engine. So a good way to get discovered haveyour podcast be discovered, is through youtube. So it is the most requested feature onsquadcast to add video recorded in something that we're testing internallynow and actually going to start rolling out here pretty soon to becomegenerally available. So we're really excited about that. But it's reallyrooted in customer feedback telling us that, like hey, you know I kind of wantmy show to be everywhere. My audience, I need to be where my audience is at,and some of my audience is on spotify, some of thems on Youtube, some ofthem's going to find me on social media, which is actually becoming more commonway that that people are discovering...

...podcast. So it's really just empoweringthe content creator to reach as many people as they can and then andcontinue to blu, build their show and influence, and so, okay, so videosobviously being requested. But I we look beyond that. What do you see isthe next big thing in podcasting our content creation, as we go into inthe next year and beyond. So I thinkthe thing that's difficult for a podcaster is ou. It's a very it's kindof a lonely game. Even Sei think you can. You can relate right,and so I think getting sometimes. The podcaster isfull of passion and doing all the things Ta Zac- and I just recommend IDhere, but they really don't know if it's resonating with their audience or,if they're like who's listening. How engaged are they so? I think kind ofbreaking that wall and helping the podcaster gets some more directfeedback similar to like how a you know: Comedian they're, a standup comedianwhen they're telling jokes, they kind of get instant feedback. If that jokehit or did it, and I feel like a podcasters kind of dealing with thesame problem of not being able to get that feedback so getting interactiveand getting to know their audience a little bit better. I think it's a hugething that we're excited about awesome, so we've talked a lot about what whatsquadcast does here and there, but would love for you just to be able toprovide the audience kind of he the quick overview of what it is thatsquadcast does and what they should be. Turning to you for yeah happy to so, I think atits core.We help podcasters connect with their guests anywhere in the world. So it'sit's a web application where you can just send a link to somebody reallyeasy to connect with them and, and then your guest at that point is hands off.They can focus all on the conversation and you as the host have controls tostart and stop recording. You have a lot of insight into what your guest isrecording with as far as their microphone their camera. Their networkspeed, where they're at in the world there's a lot of transparency. That canbe helpful to know that your guest is...

...using the Mike that's in front of them.We can forget sometimes that our guests are not like us, they're, notprofessional podcasters, so it makes it really easy o to work with your guest.Do Multiple takes if you need to and have that peace of mind all the whilethat the technology is not going to get in the way it's going to be there tohelp you when you need it, but is really just to fade into thebackgrounds. So you can focus on your guest and that conversation that'sgoing to resonate with your audience and and not need to worry. I thinkwe've all kind of experienced some worry when we do these remote content,production style recordings, you're, always kind of wondering if you'regoing to get the file at the other end of it. So we lean into that and providea lot of transparency into what squadcast is doing with the recordingand peace of mind that you're always going to get that we have primaryrecordings that are in wave and MP three for audio today, then we alsohave backup recordings that are just recorded automatically in thebackground, without needing to do anything and that's the entireconversation from start to finish. So that's really the experience and togive you a sense of the scale here know we help. We help a lot of podcastersrecord a lot of content. So over a hundred and twenty countries, we'vehelped people connect, and every month we see about a year of audio recordedon the platform. Currently, so it's amazing how many people we can helprecord and connect each other and really provide that that positiveaudience experience for for the listeners awesome all right. So, let'schange e direction here, a little bit. We ask all of our guests two standardquestions at the end of IACH interview. The first is simply as cofounders asrevenue executives yourselves. That actually makes you prospects for othersales professionals and I'm curious to know if somebody doesn't have areferral. If there's not somebody, you trust, that's referring them in what isit that works with you most effectively for someone to capture your attentionand earn some earn the right to some time on your calendar...

...yeah. I think this is something thatrock and I talk about actually fairly often and is something that you'retotally right like we. We do some sales on on our end asfounders, so we have empathy for that, but then yeah as a technology, companyand executive, we we work with a lot of different partner companies and vendorsthat help us provide different aspects of our service. So we really look forsomething similar to the what our style, where it's it's more so just focusingon on what the what the problem you're trying to solve is doing some homeworkup front and having that empathy for like actually helping people solve thatchallenge. So I think if those boxes are checked for me and and peoplearen't like too pushy or anything like that, they can get some time with us toreally talk about how they can help awesome. Anything you'd add to thatrock yeah. I think very similar to what Zacksaid. I just know too often when dealing with sales folks, I feel likethey're, very focused on the short term and focused on their needs and not somuch like what I the customer actually need, and it's very frustrating,because you know they're not coming from a place of empathy or not lookingto build a relationship for the long term. It's all about the short termstuff and for me it's a complete turnoff and I feel I feel like it's anissue. But I have empathy for them because I'm sure it's if you follow theincentive structure that they're just trying to they're just playing the game,the way that within the rules and trying to optimize for for theirpersonal gain or their companies gain. So I get it, but it's a huge turnofffor me and I'm actually a lot more. I communicate that more now, because it'sjust it's, I don't care that you, your quarter end is coming. That has I don'tthat doesn't matter to me, you know, but they act like it does, and it's incredibly frustrating to dealwith absolutely and we spend a lot of time working with teams to help getthem out of that mindset, regardless of what the comstructure is because right,it is absolutely annoying as how so all right last Nyour way chat serious.Please! Well! Actually it's funny,...

...because when e, when I get really poorprospecting to me, I turn around and go to the CGEO o the company and say heyif you min to help you fix this. Let me know Isis, so it's almost like, because whatI do it's almost like the prospect hit comes to me at times, which can begreat. Some CEOS don't respond to well to that. But you know I a can't whenI'm Onye so last question we calle it ouracceleration insight. There's one thing: You could tell sales marketing orprofessional services people, one piece of advice: You could give them that youbelieve would help them hit their targets. What would it be and why yeah you want to go? First Rock, I willsay yeah again, it just goes down to plain the long game. I think too oftenwith specially sales individuals, they do everything they can to get the sale,but once the sales done, it's almost like their job is done, but a lot oftimes when a company decides to select a vendor. It's often because of theindividual that they were working with on the sales team, but there seems tobe a disconnect when you're past being a prospect and actually a customerwhere you kind of get passed onto the customer, support or customer successand there's this big disconnectand. So I feel like if sales individuals ouldtry to play the long game and look at things more holistically and not justlike the sale doesn't end right after you know the paperwork assignd so tospeak. I think I think I think we people would be a lot more happy withcompanies, but that's just again my personal impression being in aexecutive and- and you know it's something that we try to foster withsquadcast, because we have a customer support team who is different than whatZack and I do. But fortunately we you know are still small enough- that wecan all stay in contact. But we really don't want to lose that where it kindof falls in line with what we've seen other companies kind of fall victim toenxact anything you'd AD. To that one, I think what rock just said, but alsoyou know, when you're working with people, whether they're peer companiesor partners O or customers like just always try to look for ways to makethings a win win. You know like B, be trying to help otherpeople and and thatthat helps your business just as kind...

...of a side effect. So I think, if you'refocused on that that as kind of a prerequisite, then you know otherpeople are going to know you're coming from from a good place. Thinking about,like rock said the long term, and you know, reputation and actually upholdingthat and fostering it over the long term, if you're doing that and andlooking to help people with a win win at that, I think resonates and goes along way with people in all sorts of relationships, Ave, excellent, so rockZack. Thank you so much for taking time. I cannot thank you enough for being onthe show today. Thank you, chat, really appreciate it all right, everybody thatdoes it for this episode, please check out squadcast, I'm sure you can findthese gentlemen on linked. In give it a look, don't let any of your ownhesitations keep you from creating some amazing content that are going tochange people's lives out there, and you know the drill check us out of beto be revizeccom share the episodes with friends, Families Coworkers, letyour kids listen to it instead of play on screens and until next time weavalue selling associates with nothing, but the greatest success. You've been listening to the BTBrevenue executive experience to ensure that you never miss an episodesubscribe to the show, an itunes or your favorite podcast player. Thank youso much for listening until next time.

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