The B2B Revenue Executive Experience
The B2B Revenue Executive Experience

Episode · 4 years ago

Dale Dupree on The Dreaded Phone

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

As social networking online continues to evolve, less and less salespeople are comfortable picking up the phone and calling decision makers. Some may even think that cold calling doesn’t work.

We sat down with Dale Dupree, a.k.a. the Copier Warrior and general manager of Zeno Office Solutions, to learn how to become more effective when using this amazing tool, and tactics for supporting your efforts.

You were listening to the BB revenue executive experience, a podcast dedicated to helping the executives train their sales and marketing teams to optimize growth. Whether you're looking for techniques and strategies or tools and resources, you've come to the right place. Let's accelerate your growth in three, two, one. Welcome everyone to the B Tob Revenue Executive Experience. I'm your host, Chad Sanderson. Today we're talking about the dreaded phone, how to become more effective using this amazing tool, how to stop kidding yourself that it doesn't work, and tactics for supporting your calling efforts. To help us that we have Dale Tow pre, Aka the copyer warrior, and general managers, you know, office solutions. Deale, thank you for taking time to be on the show today. Hey, thanks for having me chat. I appreciate it. So normally we have this question that I asked me getting about some defining moment in career stuff, but I got I gotta skip that this time, man, because I've been following you. We've been talking on Linkedin in through social platforms, and I caught when that you were in a band and toured and had a record out, like I need I need the backstory their brother. I need to I need to understand that awesome. Yeah, so that's a fun one, right, because it all started with being a creative person and and and really just like having the heart of a child into my teens and he been into being thirty two years old, right. I mean, I'm I haven't really deviated from being a child life. But but as a teenager I dreamed of being in a band, right, and so in middle school, actually with with one of my best friends, I started playing music, and I mean we were terrible. I mean probably the worst thing that you've ever heard. I'm in my poor parents, and then even my aunt Becky, who allowed me to use her garage from time to time when my mom would just have had it up to her neck with me at that point. I mean my family was always accommodating and very passionate about what it is that I wanted to do for a living. Right. So they helped to a degree, right, but I'm sure they were punished to some extent. And and so, if they're listening, I apolo shots to them all those times. But yeah, it started to develop into something where we became good at what we were doing and we looked at a market place that we were walking into as musicians and and kind of came up with strategies to disrupt it. We want, even from going to shows and watching how bands performed and discussing after the show, like what would we do differently right and, you know, how could we get people more engaged? And about the time that I was seventeen and most of the guys in the band were seventeen. There was a couple gentlemen there were a little bit older, but we got signed to Pluto records, which was an Indie label owned by Brian Koble. He's he's a great friend to me even to this day. We stay in touch. But he got he gave me my wings and and I hit the road. So right out of high school, no college, just right into a fifteen passenger van with a trailer and a bunch of musical equipment, Dude. And we did it, you know. I mean I'll never forget the first, you know, couple of tours we did, but the reward after where, you know, we walked into a best buy or a virgin records, back when those were like popular places to buy CDs and and we'd pull our album up in the I section in the in the metal genre, you know, and we take pictures of it and just think we'd made it man. But the unfortunate reality of being a musician, especially in a touring band, is that it's just not that easy. And realistically, I had to come back to something and and and at home there was a lot of good things. My Dad owned a copyer company that he built in one thousand nine hundred and eighty four with a few bucks in his pocket and a noncompete waying on his shoulder. E. He had it out of his territory to honor that noncompete and took a chance...

...right, a big risk. My Dad was a huge entrepreneur, and so I just had it in my blood to to come back and do sales to some degree. And I had a great girl at home that I had just been married to, and and I wanted to start a family. And so for me, like even though you know, my my dream, as people would say, like from the perspective of the music side, that it didn't come to fruition like realistically might, all my dreams have have absolutely been met. At this point, I'd never knew that I would be where I am today. That's awesome. What was the name of the band? So the band was called imperial. It's easy to find because you just you type in my name, Dale to pre and then type in the word imperial. You'll find us. It's just that simple. Okay, I'm I'm right. As soon as we get done recorder, you know I'm going to do that. Awesome, awesome. So all right. So came back started doing cover your sales. Anybody that's paying attention on Linkedin knows that you're dominating that space and we both share, I think, a similar view of cold calling and that that strategic and eruption of people right and making sure that we're adding value. Cold calls, if you know, easiest way to make that human connection, and that's really what it's all about. Social media take a little bit more time, emails, whatever, but that phone makes that connection, and so I'm curious you. You get somebody on the phone and what do you how do you make the most, how do you recommend people make the most out of those first fifteen seconds? Yeah, I got a big opinion on the phone and and it cold calls in general, right, because it like you said, like cold calling, is kind of that gateway into an emotional connection with somebody, because you're you're getting down to brass tacks, you're looking someone straight in the eye and and you can either have an agenda and fail or are you can walk in willing to learn and build a relationship and and try to serve somebody. And I'm telling you, even if you don't get the business you you have won and you will reap the rewards of your attitude and your actions. And it all starts on the phone in most cases, right, because we look up a company, right, or we've got US crm that has all this data in it. When we get to our new job or the one that we've been in for five years and they have assigned us a new territory, you know, whatever the case may be, right, but regardless, you know what we have in front of us at the office when we're sitting down. You know, whether it's for a couple hours or four, half the day, is a phone and and phone numbers and a lot of information at our fingertips because of Linkedin and you know facebook for business, I mean all the way to instagram. It can't can you find business people, but also the personalities of the buyers that you're searching for, right so you can dive deep into who they are and so that those first fifteen seconds on the phone with a decision maker, they're the most crucial and and, if you and I are being honest, the last thing that we ever want to receive as a sales call. But we love them, I mean you and I love them, you gotta admit it, because we're judging someone on the other line the whole time, like yeah, give me your pitch, Ma'm I want it. Oh yeah, but but the human nature part of it is to kind of roll your eyes and say, Oh my God, another sales call, this is not what I was looking forward to. Yeah, what do you want, Dale, what can I do for you? So understanding that that emotion is being felt from the recipient at all times, even if they're in a good mood. I mean there's going to be some hesitation on their part to talk to you no matter what, even if they give you information. I mean in two weeks they could disappear on you completely. So those first fifteen seconds of the human connection so so giving having a script available is great, but really just beating yourself getting someone on the phone and and saying hey, my name is Dale and yeah, I'm one of the Tenzero Copyer guys that calls you regularly. But I just want to tell you, you know, before we get started here on this conversation that you're probably going to want to hang up on me during, is that I'm...

...different. And allow me to prove that to you, you know, over thirty seconds while I give you my quote unquote, pitch and and honestly, sir or ma'am, you know all, I'm really looking for some feedback. You know, what do you think of my approach and what do you think of the things that I'm trying to accomplish with business? Is similar to yours when it comes to their workflow processes. But you know, a lot of people just feel that they have to be scripted right, they have to talk business and if they're not talking business, then you know they're not doing their work. But ninety nine percent of our life is behind a desk man. I mean realistically, if we think about it, we work so that we can live and and I'm of the idea that I want to mash those two. I don't want to look at work. That way, I want to live to work, you know. So, yeah, that's why it's important to really take it seriously. When you get someone on the phone, for those first fifteen seconds, you're going to pitch your product and get hung up on are you going to tell somebody why you're different? Be a pattern, interrupting their day and gain their trust faster than you ever, you know, thought possible, but faster than you've gained your girlfriend or your wife's pross now when the first out up so well, and there's I mean there's a lot in that, right, because the scripts, I think scripts can be effective if somebody's just not confident, right, because that when you're talking about an audio connect, right, you're just talking about having somebody on the phone. You need to project that confidence, authenticity, and there is, I mean, and I guess I should, you know, be thankful for because it's part of what our businesses but there's this massive fear about getting rejected on the phone and because of that you see people stutter, stammer, not know what they want to say, not know how to they forget how to be human, how to be authentic, and I think that that point of using a pattern interrupt, just being honest, like, Hey, this is what I'm trying to colllish. I would love you to help me with some feedback. I think that's a genuine and effective way to do it. The trick is that so many people just won't pick up the phone. It's like they can't get over the fear. Like I get all the excuses in the world why they're not picking up the phone and it just it's it gets to the point where you just kind of shake your head say, okay, well, I'm going to beat you dext quarter because I'm not afraid to pick up the phone or your copes, like right, right, right. I will say, though, that after after I started to get the Hank because I just force myself to do it. I think that the approach for a salesperson that wants to be bigger and better than everyone else is that he has to or she has to persevere through the things that they don't like the most and continue to do them on a daily basis as a practice routine to get them into the habit of doing it. I mean to be quite frank with you. I do not prefer the phone over walking in meeting someone. I'm much better in person, and I don't deny that, but I will beat you on the phone any day. And if your attitude isn't that of perseverance and and that of competition, you know even friendly competition is, you're never going to really get the hang of it. Okay, and honestly, even in having that attitude, you don't get the hang of it, but you force yourself into something that just becomes ritualistic and habitual. But I will say once I started getting that talk track down to the extent that I could, where I knew how to use the proper tonality with the Front Desk Lady, I knew how to use the proper tonality when I got the person on the phone that I need to talk to, and they could have been one out of a hundred different personalities, right, but as soon as they picked up that phone and I heard what they had to say to me, I know exactly how I was going to talk. It becomes addicting, right, and so the idea and the attitude of people just not really enjoying being on the phone guy, as you can all overcome that and it's easy and the best part is is that it becomes fun. It really does yeah, yeah, it's start. It does. It really becomes, I mean the addiction part of it, in a good way, not for those that are listening, not in a negative way. But if I go three days, two days, without having hit my call blocks, I mean I literally sad. I can feel the...

...anxiety starts to build because I feel like I'm not in control of my pipeline right I'm not. I've now introduced a gap and that gap is going to create ripples down, down the way that I don't want. I mean in the phone is. It's a it's a critical component of any salesperson's existence. But you also mentioned that you're better in person, and so you've, as we were prepping, you mentioned in person knocks, and so tell me, tell me how you approach those and how you find those to be the most effective. So I like I really am addicted to the in person cold call. I I can I can see in someone's eyes whether or not they want to talk to me. I can understand better when I'm making that human connection, what my strategy needs to be with this particular account, with this particular person. It's just different. I mean I think everybody can admit to that and to be quite frank, there's not enough people going out and doing in person knocks and out now they're there are people doing them right, don't get me wrong, but you know, I talk to some people over the last three months just candidly about you know. So how does cold calling from a doortodoor knock approach, you know, fit into your culture? And a lot of people say, Oh, yeah, we we do that. You know, we do it all the time. And so I'd asked like, well, how many does a rep do a day? And they'd say, well, probably like ten a week. You know that the idea to me, though, that that people are just doing such little work inside of their community in order to gain business and to be successful. I mean, they're not earning it and so they're not going to get to that point. Is the bottom line really and adapting to a different mindset and also just really changing the habits of a salesperson that is out of touch with cold knocks. You know, doortodoor is important because there's going to be guys like me out there and this generation of millennials doing it that that is going to set us apart from everybody else, and so you can have someone banging out the phones calling a hundred people a day as a telemarketer and you could have twenty people doing that. But when the guy who goes to meet them and do that initial appointment shows up, he's on a whole another level hit, and it's not a good one because he hasn't done the work to get in there in the first place, right, and you know. So it to me that the sales world is kind of backwards in that respect, where we don't tell somebody, you know, here's a steak, it's raw, you have no fire, no charcoal, nothing. Now figure out a way to cook this thing, you know. We instead we serve it on a platter. We ask him if they want bread and butter with it. I mean we're just to accommodating in some cases to salespeople. We've got it. We've got to make them work for right. And the knock approach is great for me for my call approach, because I do a lot of knocking before I do my calls and it warms my call up in most cases. So it's a strategy that I've I've had for years and I stand by it. Well, I mean, and it's a great you know, it's a great example of that concept of familiarity being truth. Right. So everybody's get all these channels at their disposal, whether it be, you know, in person, whether it be interact or engaging on social whether it be even leaving a voicemail just designed to provide value, not really asking for anything. You start to warm that person up so that when you do get that connection it's easier to convert. And I see so many people try just one thing, like Oh, I'm going to spend this month on Linkedin and twitter and that's all I'm going to do. Okay, well, good luck, because that's, you know, that's one of all of these channels that you have your disposal. And I mean sales is getting, I don't want to say it's getting more difficult. Let's say it's getting a little bit more complex. There's easier distractions, right, you can get lost in a whole bunch of stuff. But I mean to do something like that, to like make the in person knocks then do the calls. Then there's also the marketing aspect of a lot of people talk about sales people having to be kind of, you know, semi marketing professionals these days as well. And so I've seen some of the things you put up on Linkedin and I know some of the things that you've used. But I'd love for the audience here when you when you think about that marketing aspect of it,...

...what's the been the most effective for you? Yeah, the marketing side. You know, a lot of people don't know that part of my life, especially on Linkedin. I mean they see my stories and but if you're not one of my customers or you haven't worked with me at some point, or some of my competition is privy to it, because my you know, it'll be their customer before it was mine. But you know, you really don't know what I'm capable of in that case. You know, I still remember back in in two thousand and thirteen, I came out with a campaign where I was literally just doing a photo shoot on a grain screen so I could put myself in all these ridiculous situations with a copy or one of my favorite that came out of it was I had a sword and it was being pulled like excalibur out of a copy machine that was plated in gold and at the bear in the middle of the woods, mind you, and at the very top ride of the the imagery. It said every day he wakes up believing this is his job. It just was so obnoxious and and so off the wall that that people loved it. And I actually made it into an eight and a half by eleven sized document and on the backside I put a resume, one that carried twig would probably be super impressed with if she's listening, but it was. It was detailed with my story, my testimony. You know, sure, it had some some examples of where I had worked and what I had done, but but, like we just discussed, I mean I only worked for two companies up until, you know, making the switch to Zeno, my dad's company, and I played in the band right. So so people would see those things and they would say wow, this guy, he's got a pretty interesting story. They'd ask, you know, well, what's the family business and I'd get more detailed into it, or they'd say, Oh, you were a rock star, and I'd I'd get more detailed into it. They that one always disappointed people. They wanted to hear the glint and Glamor and yeah, we had sometimes that were fun, but for the most part it's just a bunch of really you know, disgusting stories, sleeping on floors and smelling terrible because you have a showered and for days would. But besides that, you know, the idea, though, of being humanizing yourself inside of your marketing, I think is important, right, because it's your own personal brand. If people see your marketing but then they meet you and you're not that person, that's very dangerous and it's not helpful for what you're trying to accomplish inside of your own market, inside of your community, because really what you're turning people onto is that you're more than a salesperson, right, so they want to look at you from the perspective of what, what, what can this person do for my business? How much of a professional are they really? And so, inside of all the Zaniness, I had some great bullet points about my accomplishments in business. So people would look at it and have fun with it, but at the same time, they would say, would ask me questions about the bullet points that I put in about, you know, work, and they'd ask me questions about my family because of that, right, and my dad running a business and how that relates to my success, right, and why I have such a vast knowledge of my industry because, I mean technically I've been doing it since I was in diapers. You know, I've Seen I've seen my dad coming in with the coin operated, you know, copyer machine since since I was a baby. And and then in high school watched him, you know, implement and develop workflow strategies through paper list environments when when people were still screaming, you know, now we're you know, I got a print everything right. So, so I was on the cutting edge all my life and because of that it made my marketing easy to incorporate kind of the boat boat, both of those aspects of being a little whacky and Zany but also being able to be serious. I think it's important to to be serious inside of Your Business Life, right, but but to show people that you're fun. Matter of fact that a friend of mine had a great kind of tagline for his business where it is called action was or is, a kind of experience. The difference, I guess you would say, was that he was seriously fun right, if you hired his marketing agency, that's what you got. And and and in his pictures he would put a little red nose on, like a clown nose, and he'd bring one to the meetings and heed throw...

...them at you and tell you to put them on. When you guys, when you started the discovery and I think it was things like that that I just had people in my life that I mean some of them don't even know what they did for me, I'm sure to some degree, but no, my imagination runs wild with that kind of stuff. So I'd say one of my favorite marketing pieces that I ever did was, and for people that don't know, I have my own TV commercial ab two of them actually, so if they want to dig into my linked in or even at Copyer Warriorcom, they can check them out. So they can just kind of get a taste of what my marketing really looks like. But I once made a cardboard cut out of myself and and use that to call on a prospect and there is there is a copier in the in the cutout right, and it was about six feet tall and it was probably one of the craziest things I ever did. I never got to cut out back, but I'll tell you right now I got an appointment with that guy. That is great. You know, the creativity and I like that seriously fun thing right, like you're right. You have to be authentic, you have to be human, but you also have incredible and and being able to be creative and walk that line and know where it is. You know, the difference been capturing attention and then converting to trust. Those are those are powerful places to be. I think a lot of Reps. I think a lot of reps struggle with them. And then, I mean, so you've got cold calling at the marketing aspect of it, you got the in person. Then there's this aspect that I see reps struggle with and I don't know, I struggle with it too. It's definitely not my forte but networking, networking groups. I have, and maybe it's just me, but I have this thing where it's like, I don't really believe you want to hear anything I have to say until we get to some point of common ground. So when I'm at a cocktail party, I'm not a football guy. I don't, I don't not a football guy. Okay, yeah, I sold business to the Minnesota Vikings. That's about as close to football as like that. You know, I basketball. Yeah, played it, but don't watch it. So all of the things that most people want to start talking about. I just going to have to sit there and not right. But there's huge power. I've seen my business point or huge, huge things with networking groups and I'm kind of curious how you approach them and how you leverage that aspect of community in your day to day yeah, for sure. I think that one of the the pieces of networking that people don't understand when they first learn about it or go to a be and I group, because that's the most famous around the United States. You know, pay six hundred dollars a year to have breakfast with a bunch of people that are going to give you leads. Right, like, I'm not a huge believer and be and I, but what a great concept at least to get people's feet wet, right, and I was into being I groups and they were very successful for me. But I think the problem business that people look at it as Oh, wait a second, so I'm going to go into this group and leads are going to be given to me. Awesome, right, and they show up and they give their pitch every Monday morning for four weeks and nothing. You know, no one gives them anything because they're just focused on the wrong outcome. Now, when I first started in networking groups. The first meeting I ever had I heard three people ahead of me talk and I wrote down at least five referrals that I could give to those people now, not individually, but then total. And after the meeting I remember walking up to them and saying, Hey, I've got connections for you, and then the next gentleman, I got connections for you, and that became addicting for me. And and and when you give to somebody like that, they are absolutely going to do their best to give back to you. And other people in the networking group see that too. They say, I want to earn, you know, part of this guy's network, he knows a lot of people, he's given out all these referrals. People are getting business from it, and so it comes back to you tenfold. I experienced it, so I know it to be true where if you go in with the the mindset of giving instead of just trying to take what you can get and moving on to the next one, that you will be super successful in...

...a networking grip. And so you know, you've talked about common ground with people and Networking Group. So there is the after hours crowd right, or there's the event for the local Medical Association or Builders Association. You show up and you're the only sales guy in most cases there with a bunch of people that are business owners and they don't want to be pitched and so it is tough because you're not going to get along with everybody. I mean you're going to have guys talking about politics. You're going to be rolling your eyes, you know, without them saying I mean, if they can get frustrating. But if your heart is in it for the right reasons, when you show up at those events and you're focused on trying to learn more about the people who have your ear that you will be successful in that, because that people will eventually just say they'll stop talking about the common ground and they'll just say what do you do? They'll just get interested in you because you're doing the complete opposite of what anybody else would with them right. So a lot of times I at a networking group, I won't walk up to someone and introduce myself and say, you know, what do you do for a living? I'll I'll walk up to someone and be like it just straight up saying so is this? I've never been here. Is this a good networking group? You got, you got any any dirt on this place that you want to share with me before I show up again next you know, if you're you know, it's the same concept, that being a pattern interrupt inside of just anything. Or realistically, I mean you do in your personal life to and you'll find some success to that right. But telling people that you're different, you can do that all day, but if you walk it and talk it, you know, people notice and that's a big piece of networking for me. But I mean, I'll tell you I focused on two to three networking groups a week. It was the standard for me. was definitely too you know, no matter what, I had to go at least to two networking events a week, whether they were consistent ones or, you know, one offs that happened once a month or once a quarter. I I was always making sure I had to on my calendar and I would show up with no expectations. I would just go looking to meet new people, gain some ground, if I could, in a relationship and try to give some referrals out. That was all I was looking to do and it became one of the most successful practices that I did inside of my sales habits. Well, I mean that servant leadership, that that concept of servant leadership. I think it is getting more traction today. I mean was talking to Scott Santucci. He kept talking about he gives the word authenticity, but I think it's that give to get mentality that if people are authentic with it, because you, I mean I'm sure you've run into people that are. You can tell when they're giving in more of a schmarm he's the only word I can think of right they're giving because they're waiting to get it rather than genuinely wanting to help someone. When people can feel that they can key off of that, and I think today that you know, people buy from people is even more powerful statement than it was ten years ago, especially with all of the tech. So to see that, to see that work in that authenticity, that's that's amazing. So I got to have a cold, cold story. Give me a great cold call story that we haven't seen on linkedin yet. Yeah, so I'm I'm going to actually I'm going to pull from a conversation I had today, and so first I want to I want to give a shout out to my boy Travis Schmidt. One of the things that he talked about today with me at our lunch and he works for Brown and Brown insurance, you know, just a little plug for him, but he talked to me today about at lunch, about what he's doing differently in order to to get a prospect to to kind of turn their head and and I'm going to use an example he gave me today as kind of my my talking point. It actually, when I think of his conversation, the first story that comes to mine is when I went and I called on a gun manufacturers. I'd never called on a manufacture at all this point in my career and to pick a gun manufacturer is probably not the brightest idea, especially with my inconvinced nonconventional ways of doing...

...cold calls. But what I did is I went out and I bought a little toy nerf gun, okay, and and then I bought like a case that I could put the gun in, and it looked a little legit right at the case that this particular location for this gun manufacture. They actually they they took in weapons that they would buy and and they because this particular owner of this weapons manufacturer had a gun collection and I had kind of heard rumors about it. So I walked in on a cold call and said, you know, I have a gun that I'd like the owner to look at, and so it was kind of it was almost embarrassing, to be honest. It's I've never done anything like this and I was I was kind of freaked out and and when the the individual did come out, it came out with one of his his right hand men, who's actually become one of my best friends and in the world of business. And they walked out and I introduced myself and I said, okay, now, I don't want y'all to freak out when you see this thing, because it's pretty awesome. And I popped it open then and they just kind of looked at each other and looked at me like what is this, and I started to explain to them, though, what why I'm was here, like the real purpose essentially, and why I wanted them to look at the gun, because, I said, listen, I not everybody can can carry a firearm in their office so that when the copier starts to act up, you know, they can't just just discharge that firearm in the office. But I'm thinking of developing, you know, a weapon like this one where when someone's frustrated at their copy machine, they can pull it out and they can just kind of shoot a couple darts into it and get their frustrations out and go with about their day. And I'm telling you, there was like a solid five seconds that silence and I just sat there and stared at both of them and and one of them looked up at me and said, are you for real? And from there he put two and two together. Basically, I was like, so you're our coffee or salesman, I said, and if this isn't the best cold call that you've ever gotten from a copier guy, then I'll quit my job tomorrow. And they started busting out laughing and they gave me a tour of the facility. They became my customer about I don't know, two or three weeks later. And in my industry turnaround on a deal is usually months, if not years. You don't just walk in somewhere and get a sale. But you know what, I found that when I would do things that we're a little unconventional and different, and that was those were my days, back when I really didn't have access to the kind of market in that I do now. So that was just me going to the store and building this thing right, but now I encourage everybody to do it, though, because, you know, the big thing that it does for you is it kind of breaks the ice for yourself. Like you think in your head, man, I got all these great ideas to make myself successful, but how many of us actually practice what we what we think right? And so just taking that leap of faith for yourself and on yourself and believing that even if the particular person you meet that day when you do something off the wall doesn't like what you showed them, that it, you know, it doesn't matter, because it's a learning piece, right. You get to you get to hear from the Horse's mouth just what they didn't like about it or what they did. And but you know, Chad, the thing is is that ninety nine percent of the time people love it. And so why not? Why are we so scared to get outside of our comfort zone and do something different that that turns heads? Yeah, I just can't understand it. So I'm with him with it. But that brings us to habits. So if we look at if you look at the habits, like with three habits, do you feel would make sales people more effective if they would just embrace them. Sounds like one would be getting out of your comfort zone it for sure. I mean, I would say the first would definitely be to just jump out of that little bubble that you've created for yourself and try it different things it whether it's on the phone, it's an end person cold call, it's during a discovery session with...

...a new client, it's during in an upgrade with an account that you've had for ten years. Think of things. It will help develop the relationship further make you stand out of the crowd, because at all times someone else is out there doing what you're doing, and most of the time in the same manner that you are, and so it's a toss up between you and them. It's it's literal luck in some cases. You know, maybe the front desks person just liked the way that gentleman or that lady looked compared to you, and so she's letting them by. I mean, why are we letting that define who we are salespeople? You know, that's get out there and be different and get outside of our bubble. I'd say the second would be would be time management, a big piece, I think, to sells habits for people or that. A lot of sales people just say, Oh, I'm too busy, I'm so busy, oh I had a busy day. Oh I didn't get time to do this or do that. You got you got a really just accept that time is always fleeting and that you're never going to have it, but to structure your day and to use a time management approach to everything you do, even if a wrench gets thrown in and you've got a fire to put out or a customer call or a prospect calls and says, Hey, come sign me up. You know, and it's a hundred thousand dollar deal. Remember to keep in mind at all times that time management is so important during your day that as you get patterned, interrupts inside of what's normal to you. You know, if you're managing your time correctly, it's no skin off your bones, right, and so being focused on that as a big piece. Now the third advice. I mean a lot of people give pretty generic advice on sales culture and and and seals habits, but I mean I just like to think differently than other people, and so that time management. A lot of people talk about that, but just think of it differently. Right, they think about your time management to be more than just how you are are stretching your day, but how it serves the people that you're interacting with as well. You've got to take yourself out of the picture to a degree. Right. You still need to be thinking about you and what's best for you, but you got to take yourself out. You got to put yourself in the customer shoes. You got to have the mindset of being an advisor and serving. So the third thing that I would say that that as a habit that people need to start doing. Sales people need to start doing is they need to stop thinking of sales as a nine hundred and twenty five or eight hundred and twenty five Monday through front. You are selling at all times. When you're out on the golf course on Saturday with your buddies and the foursome in front of you is taking forever and you're sitting back complaining. Yeah, I challenge everybody listening to this to ride up to those guys and they're probably going to be like, Oh God, you know what's happening, but just introduce yourself. What's up, guys? My name is Dale, I'm the copy. Your warrior just saw that Y'all were pretty close to us and wanted to say hello. You know, be, be who you want, you know yourself to be as a salesperson from the success standpoint, at all times during your personal life, right you know, with your family, with your friends, with everybody. I mean I'm constantly selling. I go have lunch and me to waiter and I before I leave that dudes adding me on Linkedin, I guarantee you. Well, that's perfect. So last part of this would be how do you stay motivated? Sales is is the roller coaster. I've seen it chew up and spit out a lot of people. You know, high, high highs and really low lows. How do you stay motivated? How do you maintain that positive outlook? Yeah, it this one's not easy and I don't think that my answer will will help everyone, and I don't think anybody's answer will help everyone, because we're we all have our own unique situations. Okay, and but I think one thing that we need to remember is that raw human emotion exists in all of us, the same that when you when you're at your lowest, it's not much different than the other guys low. You know, it really isn't. So there's other people out there that are in your situation. So having accountability is a big piece of how I keep myself on that just acceleration path...

...at all times, even when I'm in the lowest point. But I'll tell you right now that the biggest piece for me that keeps me going is my legacy and my father. The things that he accomplished and that he set forth for me to be able to come in and and continue is so important to me. I mean probably more important than most things in my life from a perspective of family and friendship and just a general culture of loving on those around me. Like what my dad did for me changed me to the point that I believe I owe him every second of my life to constantly be the best I possibly can be until the day that I take my last breath. Wow, that's that's a powerful that's power. That's been extremely powerful and and extremely admirable, quite frankly, to hear that. So I appreciate you share in that. So at the end of every interview we ask our guests one similar question. We call it our acceleration insight, and so there's been a lot of great perspectives and tips and tricks and hints throughout the conversation. But if there was one thing, just one piece of advice you could give to a sales professional tonight and if they took it in and embraced in started practicing it tomorrow, one piece of advice that you believe would make them better, what would it be and why? I would tell every single person, and I do tell every single person this, that start practicing integrity. Don't don't just, don't just have it in your repertoire right. Don't put it in your list of top ten things that you are as a leader. Make it number one. Make it the focal point of who you are on a daily basis. When you operate with integrity, everybody notices it, from your customers to the people in your office that are on your team to the guy that was across the way from you filling up as gas tank in the morning, because you're at aitude will be that of, you know, a very bright and shining human being that will cause a rift in your life of success that you won't even know how to handle. And and honestly, integrity is not hard to have right and there's a lot of people talk about integrity, as you know, being moral, morally sound and principle right, but the word I like inside of integrity is honor. I think that that has a powerful word and that if if people looked at the word honor and the word virtue more seriously when they think of integrity, they would understand, I think, a little bit deeper what it is that they need to accomplish through integrity on a daily basis and their own personal life and habits and how it resounds out to the masses that they're going to be touching on a daily and a weekly and a monthly, in a yearly and a decade basis. It's something that if they change in their life tomorrow and and from writing a proposal to cold calling someone to having a conversation in the office, practice integrity and you will be the most successful human being on the face of this earth, and they'll be a lot of us if we all do it. Let's start that club up now. Exactly, perfect deal. Thank you very much. If if the listeners interested in talking more about the topics we touched on today, what's the best way for them to get in touch with you? Yeah, so they can reach out to me on my website, copy or warriorcom. I've out my cell phone, my personal email. They can find me through Zeno office solutions in Orlando as well, and definitely check out the company that I represent. We're one of the top copy or dealer ships in the State of Florida and if anybody is looking for helping advice outside of you know, just get in in touch with me that way. Definitely find me on Linkedin. You can find me on Linkedin is Dale to pre the copy your warrior and follow my content because I post every day and and and I do not prescript it. So it's in the moment, raw motion, extreme commententic. Yeah, right, exactly. So common and have fun with us and get your learning...

...on. It'll be it'll be something that hopefully, will be life changing for you. That's my goal. Excellent. What Hey, again, I can't thank you know for taking the time day. It's been great having you on the show. Thanks, Chad. Appreciate the time. All right, everyone that does it for this episode. Please check us out at wwwcom. Share the episode with friends, families, Co workers. If you like what you here, leave us review on itunes. Shoot me an email. Let me know if there's a topic or guest you'd like us to have on the show. Want to make sure this is continually valuable for you guys. Until next time, we have value prime solutions. With you all, nothing but the greatest success. You've been listening to the BB revenue executive experience. To ensure that you never miss an episode, subscribe to the show and Itunes or your favorite podcast player. Thank you so much for listening. Until next time,.

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