The B2B Revenue Executive Experience
The B2B Revenue Executive Experience

Episode · 3 years ago

Dale Dupree on The Dreaded Phone

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

As social networking online continues to evolve, less and less salespeople are comfortable picking up the phone and calling decision makers. Some may even think that cold calling doesn’t work.

We sat down with Dale Dupree, a.k.a. the Copier Warrior and general manager of Zeno Office Solutions, to learn how to become more effective when using this amazing tool, and tactics for supporting your efforts.

Ere Listening to the BTB revenueexecutive experience, a podcast dedicated ELP, an executives traintheir sales and marketing teams to optimize growth, whether you're lookingfor techniques and strategies wore tools and resources, you've come to theright place. Let's accelerate your growth in three to one: Welcome Eeyouone to the btob revenue executive experience. I'm your host ChatSanderson today we're talking about the dreaded phone, how to become moreeffective, using this amazing tool, how to stop kidding yourself, that itdoesn't work and tactics for supporting your calling efforts to help us withthat. We have Dal Tepraka the Copier Warrior and General Managers ZenoOffice Solutions. Dell. Thank you for taking time to be on the show today,hey thanks for having me chat. I appreciate it so normally we have thisquestion that I asked megetting about some defiting moment in career stuff,but I got I got ta skipp that this time man, because I've been following, youwe've been talking on Linkedin and through social platforms, and I caughtwin that you were in a band in toward and had a record out like. I need. Ineed to backstory ther brother. I need T. I need to understand that awesome yeah, so that's a fun one right,because it all started with being a creative person and and andreally just like having the heart of a child into my teens and even into beingthirty. Two years old right I mean I'. I haven't really devated from being acriald nof life, but but as a teenager I dreamed of being in a band right andso in middle school. Actually, with with one of my best friends, I started playing music and I mean we were terrible. I meanprobably the worst thing that you've ever heard I' In my poor parents andthen even my aunt Becki, who allowed me to use her garage from time to timewhen my mom would just have had it up to her neck with me. At that point meanmy family was always accommodating and very, u know passionate about what itis that I wanted to do for a living right. So they helped to a degree right,but I'm sure they were punished, t to some extent, and so, if they'relestemate IPOL chop for all those times but yeah, it started to develop in tosomething where we became good and what we were doing and we looked at amarketplace that we were walking into as musicians and and kind of came upwith stratedies to disrupt it. We want even from going to shows andwatching how bands performed and discussing after the show like whatwould we do differently right and you know how could we get people moreengaged and about the time that I was seventeen and most of the guys in theband were seventeen. There was a couple gentlemen. Thay were a little bit older,but we got signed to Puto records, which was an Indi label owned by BrianCoball, he's a great friend to me. Even to this day, we stay in touch, but buthe got he gave me my wings and- and I hit the road so right out of highschool, no college just right into a fifteen passenger van with a trailerand a bunch of musical equipment dude, and we did it. You know I mean I'll,never forget th the first. You know couple F tours we did, but the rewardafter where you know we walked into a best by or a virgin records back whenthose were like popular places to buy CDs and and we'd pull our album up inthe eye section in the in the metal genre. You know, and we take picturesof it and just think we'd made it man, but the unfortunate reality of being amusician, especially in a toring band, is at it's just not that easy. Anrealistically I had to come back to something and andand at home there was a lot of good things. My Dad owned a copy or companythat he built in one thousand nine hundred and eighty four with a few bucks in his pocket and a anoncompete Wein on his shoulder. He headed out of his territory to honorthat non compete and took a chance...

...right at a big risk. My Dad was a hugeentrepreneur, and so I just had it in my blood to to come back and do salesto some degree, and I had a great ow girl at home that I had just beenmarried to and I wanted to start a family, and so for me like, even thoughyou know my my dream, as people would say, likefrom the perspective of the music side that it didn't come tofruition like realistically, my all my dreams have have absolutely been met.At this point, I never knew that. I would be where I am today. That's awesome. What was the name ofthe band, so the band was called imperial. It's easy to find, because you, justyou type in my name, Dal depre and then type in the word imperial you'll findus it's just that simple! Okay, I'm T WRIGT as soon as we get done recorder.You know I'm going to do that. Awesome awesome. So all right so came backstarted. Doing Cov, yeur sales, you anybody, that's paying attention onlink, did knowis that you're dominating that space and we both share, I think asimilar view of cocalling and that that strategic in ruption of people rightand making sure that we're adding value cold calls. If is you know, I theeasiest way to make that human connection and that's really what it'sall about social may take a little bit more time, emails whatever, but thatphone makes that connection. And so I'm curious you, you get somebody on thephone and what do you? How do you make the most? How do you recommend peoplemake the most out of those first fifteen seconds yeah, I got a bigopinion on the phone and and it col calls in general right because t likeyou said, like cold calling is kind of that gateway into an emotionalconnection with somebody, because you're you're getting down to brass taxyou're. Looking someone straight in the eye, a D and You can either have anagenda and fail or ore. You can walk in willing to learn and build arelationship and try to serve somebody, and is I'm telling you even if youdon't get the business s you have won and, and you will reap the rewards ofyour attitude and your actions and it all starts on the phone in most casesright because we look up a company Rigt or we've got a crm that has all thisdata in it when we get to our new job or the one that we've been in for fiveyears and they have assined us a new territory. You know whatever the casemight be right, but regardless you know what we have in front of us at theoffice when we're sitting down. You know whether it's for a couple hours orfor half the day, theres a phone and phone numbers and a lot of informationat our fingertips. Because of Linkedin- and you know facebook for business, Imean all the way to instagram it can. Can you find business people, but alsothe personalities of the buyers that you're searching for right, so you candive deep into who they are and so that those first fifteen seconds on thephone with a decision maker, they're, themost crucial and and if you and I are being honest, the lastthing that we ever want to receive is a sales call, but we love them. I meanyou and I love Y gotta, admit it because we're judging someone on theother line. The whole time like yeah, give me your pitch Manoh yeah, but butthe human nature part of it, is to kind of roll your eyes and say: Oh, my God,another sales call. This is not what I was looking forward to yeah. What doyou want Dale? What can I do for you so understanding that that emotion isbeing felt from the recipient at all times, even if they're in a good mood,I mean there's going to be some hesitation on their part to talk to you,no matter what, even if they give you information, I mean in two weeks theycould disappear on you completely. So those first fifteen seconds of thehuman connection, so so giving having a script available is great, but reallyjust being yourself getting someone on the phone and and saying hey, my nameis Dale and yeah, I'm one of the ten thousand copier guys that calls youregularly, but I just want to tell you you know before we get started here onthis conversation that you're probably going to want to hang up on me during,is that I'm different and it allowd me...

...to prove that to you. You know overthirty seconds while give you my quote: Unquote Pitch and honestly, sir orma'am. You know all I'm really looking for some feedback. You know what do youthink of of my approach and what do you think of the things that I'm trying toaccomplish with businesses similar to yours when it comes to their workflowprocesses? But you know a lot of people just feel that they have to be scriptedright. They have to talk business and, if they're not talking busiess, thenyou know they're not doing their work, but ninety nine percent of our life isbehind a desk man. I mean realistically, if we think about it, we work so thatwe can live and- and I'm of the idea that I want to match those two, I don't wantto look at work. That way I want to live to work. You know, so that's why it's important to reallytake it seriously. When you get someone on the phone for those fir fifteenseconds you going to pitch your product and get hung up on, are you going totell somebody why you're different be a pattern interruptin their day and gaintheir trust faster than you ever? You know, thought possible, but faster thanyou gained your girlfriend or your wife's pouse that won the first pate sowell, there's I mean there's a lot in that righ, because the scripts, I thinkscripts can be effective if somebody's just not confident right, because thatwhen you're talking about an audio connect right, you just talking abouthaving somebody on the phone. You need to project that confidence,authenticity and there is, I mean- and I guess I should you know- be thankfulfor because it's part of what our businesses, but there's this massivefear about getting rejected on the phone, and because of that you seepeople, stutter stammer not know what they want to say, not know how to theyforget how to be human, how to be authentic, and I think that that pointof iesing a pattern interrupt just being honest like hey. This is what I'mtrying to accomplish. I would love you to help me with some feedback. I thinkthat's a genuine and effective way to do it. The trick is that so many peoplejust won't pick up the phone. It's like they can't get over. The fear, like Iget all the excuses in the world, why they're not picking up the phone and itjust it's? It gets to the point where you just kind of shake your headand say:okay. Well, I'm Goinno beat you next quarter, because I'm not afraid to pickup the phone or your coaths will like be right right right. I will say,though, that after after I started to get the Hank,because I just forced myself to do it- I think that th, the approach for asalesperson that wants to be bigger and better than everyone else is that hehas, or she has to persevere through the things that they don't like themost and continue to do them on a daily basis as a practice routaine to getthem into the habit of doing it. I mean to be quite frank with you. I do notprefer the phone over walking in meeting someone I'm much better inperson, and I don't deny that, but I will beat you on the phone any day andand if your attitude isn't, that of perseverance and and that ofcompetition, you know even friendly competition is you're, never going to really get thehang of it. Okay and and honestly, even in having that attitude, you don't getthe hang of it, but you force yourself into something that just becomesritualistic and habitual. But I will say once I started getting that tolktrack down to the extent that I could, where I knew how to use the propertonality with the Front Desk Lady, I knew how to use the proper tenalitywhen I got the person on the phone that I need to talk to and thet could havebeen one out of a hundred different personalities right, but as soon asthey picked up that phone- and I heard what they had to say to me- I knowexactly Owi was Goino: Tak, it becomes addictive right, and so the idea and the attitude of peoplejust not really enjoying being on the phone guys. You can all overcome thatand it's easy and the best part is, is that it becomes fun. It really doesyeah it start it does. It really becomes. I mean the addiction part ofit in a good way, not for those that are listening, not in negative way. Butif I go three days two days without having hit my callblocks, I mean Iliterally to the I can feel the anxiety...

...start to build, because I feel like I'mnot in control of my pipeline right. I'm not. I've now introduced a gap andthat gap is going to create ripples down the down. The way that I don'twant, I mean in the phone. Is it's a it's a critical component of anysalesperson's existence, but you also mention that you're, better in personand so you've as we are prepent you mentioned in person, knocks and so tellme, tell me how you approach those and how you find those to be the mosteffective. So I like, I, really am addicted to the UNPERSON COL call I I can. I can see in someone's eyeswhether or not they want to talk to me. I can understand better when I'm makingthat human connection, what my strategy needs to be with thisparticular account with this particular person. It's just different. I mean, Ithink everybody can admit to that and, to be quite frank, there's not enoughpeople going out and doing in person, dox and now now the there are peopledoing them right. Don't get me wrong, but you know I talk to some people overthe last three months. Just candidly about you know so how tdoes coldcalling from adoor to door knock approach. You know Fitt into yourculture and a lot of people say: Oh Yeah, we do that. You know we do it allthe time and so I'd ask like well how many does a rep do a day and they'd saywell, probably like ten a week you know th the idea. So me, though, tthat people are just doing such little workinside of their community in order to gain business and to be successful, Imean they're, not earning it and so they're not going to get to that point.It's the bottom line really and adapt into a different mindset, and also justreally changing the habits of a salesperson that is out of touch withcold. Knocks you know, Dornador is important because there's going to beguys like me out there and this generation of millennials doing it thatthat is going to set us apart from everybody else, and so you can havesomeone banging out the phones calling a hundred people a day as atelemarketer, and you can have twenty people doing that, but when the guy,who goes to meet them and do that, initial appointment shows up he's on awhole nother level and it's not a good one, because he hasn't done the work toget in there in the first place right- and you know so to me that the salesworld is kind of backwards. In that respect, where we don't tell somebody,you know, here's a steak, it's raw, you have no fire, no charcoal! Nothing nowfigure out a way to cook this thing. You know we. Instead, we serve it on aplatter. We ask him if they want bread and butter with it. I mean we're justtoo accommodating in some cases to salespeople we've got it. We've got tomake them work for it, and the knock approach is great. For me for my callapproach, because I do a lot of knocking before I do my calls and itwarms my call up in most cases, so it's a strategy that I've I've had for yearsand I stand by it. Well I mean- and it's a great you know it's a greatexample of that concept of a familiarity being truth right, soeverybody's got all these channels at their disposal, whether it be you knowin person whether be interactor engaging on social, whether it be evenleaving a voice mail just designed to provide value, not really asking foranything. You start to warm that person up so that when you do get thatconnection, it's easier to convert, and then I see so many people try just onething like: Oh I'm going to spend this month on Linkdin and twitter, andthat's all I'm going to do. Oh, okay! Well, good luck! Because that's youknow, that's one of all of these channels that you have your disposaland I mean sales is getting. I don't want to say it's getting more difficult.Let's say it's getting a little bit more complex is easier distractionsright. You can get lost in a whole bunch of stuff, but I mean to dosomething like that to like make the imperson knock then do the calls thenthere's also the marketing aspect of it. A lot of people talk about sales,people having to be kind of you know, semimarketing professionals these daysas well, and so I've seen some of the things you put up on Linke did, and Iknow some of the things that you've used, but I love for the audience yerewhen you, when you think about that...

...marketing aspect of it, what's been themost effective for you, yeah the marketing side. You know a lot ofpeople, don't know that part of my life, especially on Linkedon. I mean they seemy stories and but if you're, not one of my customers or you haven't workedwith me at some point, or some of my competition is privy to it because myyou know it'll be their customer before it was mine. But you know you really don't know whatI'm capable of. In that case, you know, I still remember back in two thousandand thirteen. I came out with a campaign where I was literally justdoing a photo shoot on a grain screen. So I could put myself in all theseridiculous situations with a copy or one of my favorite that came out of itwas I had a sword and it was being pulled like acallibor out of a copymachine that was plateed an goled and at the Ber, in the middle of the woods,mind you and at the very top ride of the the imagery it said every day hewakes up believing this is his job. It just was so obnoxious and so off thewall that people loved it and I actually made it into an eight and ahalf by eleven size document and on the backside. I put a resume one that carry twig would probably besuper impressed with if she's listening, but it was, it was detailed with mystory, my testimony, you know sure it had some some examples of where Ihadworked and what I had done. But but like we just discussed, I mean I onlyworked for two companies up until you know making this switch to Zeno mydad's company and I played in a band right. So so people would see thosethings and they would say wow. This guy he's got a pretty interesting story.Theyd ask you know: Well, what's the family business and I'd get moredetailed into it or they'd say? Oh, you were a rock star and I'd I get moredetailed into that. One always disappointed people. They wanted to hear the glitton clamorand yeah. We had some times that were fun, but for the most part it's just abunch of really. You know disgusting stories so sleeping on floors and smellingterrible because you haven a showered in four days with. But besides that youknow the idea, though of humanizing yourself inside of your marketing, Ithink, is important right, because it's your own personal brand. If people seeyour marketing, but then they meet you and you're, not that person that's verydangerous and it's not helpful for what you're trying to accomplish inside ofyour own market and inside of your community, because really what you'returning people onto is that you're more than a salesperson right? So they wantto look at you from the perspective of we. What what can this person do for mybusiness? How much of a professional are they really and so inside of allthe Zaniness? I had some great bullet points about my accomplishments andbusiness, so so people would look at it and have fun with it, but at the sametime they would. They would ask me questions about the bullet points thatI put in about. You know work and they'd Aske me questions about myfamily because of that right and my dad running a business and how that relatesto my success right and why I have such a vast knowledge of my industry,because I mean technically I've been doing it since I was in diapers. Youknow I've Seen I've seen my dad coming in with the coin operated. You KnowCopier machine. So since I was a baby and and then in high school watched him,you know, implement and develop workflow strategies through paperlissenvironments when when people were still screaming, you know now, you knowI got ta print everything right so so I was on the cutting edge all my life andbecause of that it made my marketing easy to incorporate kind of the Boatbot,both of those aspects of being a little wacky and Zani, but also being able tobe serious. I think it's important to to be serious inside of Your BusinessLife Right, but but to show people that you're fun matter of fact that a friendof mine had a great kind of Tagline for his business, where his called actionwas is kind of experience. The difference, Iguess you would say, was that he was seriously fun right. If, if you hiredhis marketing agency, that's what you got and and in his pictures he wouldput a little red nose on like a clown nose and he'd, bring one to the mediansand he'd, throw them at you and tell...

...you to put them on when you guys whenyou started the discovery- and it was things like that that I just had peoplein my life that I mean some of them, don't even know what they did for me,I'm sure to some degree. But now my imagination runs wild with that kind ofstuff. So Yo Kno I'd, say one of my favorite marketing pieces that I everdid was and for people that don't know I havemy own TV, commercial. I have two of them actually, so if they want to diginto my linked in or even ad copy or Warriorcom, they can check them out. Sothey could just kind of get a taste of what my marketing really looks like.But I once made a cardboard cutout of myself an and use that to call on on a aprospect- and there was there was a cafier in the in the cutout right andit was about six feet tall and it was probably one of the craziest things Iever did. I never got to cut out back NA THA, but I'll tell you right now. I got anappointment with that guy. That is great. You know the creativityand I like that seriously fun thing right, like you're right, you have tobe authentic, you have to be human, but you also V be credible and and beingable to be creative and walk that line and now, where it is, you know thedifference, beween capturing attention and then converting to trust. Those arethose are powerful places to be. I think, a lot of Reps. I think a lot ofreps struggle with them n then I mean so you've got cold, calling y. u getthe marketing aspect of it. You got the in person, then there's this aspectthat I see rep struggle with, and I don't know I struggle with it to it's.Definitely not my forttipe but networking networking groups. I have- and maybe it's just me, but Ihave this thing where it's like. I don't really believe you want to hearanything. I have to say until we get to some point of common ground. So whenI'm at a cocktail party, I'm not a Footbulk, I don't I don't not afootball guy. Okay Yeah I sold business to the Minnesota Vikings, that's aboutas close to football as like tat, you know I basketball yeah. I played it butdon't watch it. So all of the things that most people want to start talkingabout, I just kind of have to sit there and nod right, but there's huge power.I've seen my business pointer, huge, huge things with networking groups andI'm kind of curious how you approach them and how you leverage that aspectof community in your day today, yeah for sure. I think that one of thepieces of network in that people don't understand when they first learn aboutit or go to a Bani group, because that's the most famous around theUnited States, you know pay six hundred ollars a year to have breakfast with abunch of people that are going to give. You leads right, like I'm, not a hugebeliever in bean I, but what a great concept, at least to get people's feetwet right and I was in Tobean ey groups and they were very successful for me,but I think the problem is that people look at it as oh wait a second. So I'm going to gointo this group and and leads, are going to be given to me awesome rightand they show up and they give their pitch every Monday morning for fourweeks and nothing. You know, no one gives them anything because they'rejust focused on the wrong outcome, O when I first started a networkinggroups. The first meeting I ever had, I heard three people ahead of me talk andI wrote down at least five referrals that I couldgive to those people now not individually, but in total and afterthe meeting I remember walking up to them and saying: Hey, I've gotconnections for you and then the next gentleman IA got connections for youand that became addicting for me and and and when you give to somebody likethat, they are absolutely going to do their best to give back to you andother people in the networking group see that to they say I want to earn.You know part of this guy's network. He knows a lot of people he's given outall these referrals. People are getting business from it, and so it comes backto you tenfold. I experienced it so I know it to be true where, if you go inwith the the mindset of giving, instead of just trying to take what you can getand move it on to the next one, that...

...you will be super successful in anetworking group An- and so you know, you talked about common ground withpeople at notworking GRUP. So tthere is the after hours crowd, Rit, er, there'sthe the event for the local Medical Association or Builders Association.You show up and you're the only sales guy, in most cases, Ou'r with a bunchof people that are business owners and they don't want to be pitched, and soit is tough because you're not going to get along with everybody. I mean you'regoing to have guys talking about politics, you're going to be rollingyour eyes, you know without them seaying I mean if thit can getfrustrating, but if your heart is in it for the right reasons, when you show upat those events and you're focused on trying to learn more about the peoplewho have your ear, that you will be successful in that because tha peoplewill eventually just say, they'll stop talking about the common ground andthey'll just say: What do you do? They'll just get interested in youbecause you're doing the complete opposite of what anybody else wouldwith them right. So a lot of times like at a networking group. I won't walk upto someone and introduce myself and say you know what do you do for a living? II'll walk up to someone and be like it just straight up say so. Is this I'venever been here? Is this a good networking group yeah? You got. You gotany any dirt on this place that you want to share with me before I sow? U AOU, KNOWIF YOU'RE! You know it's the same concept of being a pattern,Interruptin side of just anything or realistically I mean you do in yourpersonal life too, and you'll find some success to that right, but telling people that you're different.You can do that all day, but if you walk it and talk it, you know peoplenotice and that's a big piece of networking for me, but I mean I'll tellyou. I focused on two to three networking groups a week. It was thestandard for me was definitely to you know, no matter what I had to go atleast to two newworking events a week whether they were consistent ones oryou know what off that happened once a month or once a quarter. I I was alwaysmaking sure I had two on my calentar and I would show up with noexpectations. I would just go looking to meet new people gain some ground. IfI could in a relationship and try to give some referrals out, that was all Iwas looking to do and it became one of the most successful practices that Idid inside of my cells habits. Well, I mean that servant leadership that thatconcept of servant- leadership- I think, is getting more tracto. Today I meanwas talking to Scott Santucci. He kept talking about. He give Yeuin the wordauthenticity, but I think it's that give to get mentality that if peopleare authentic with it, because you I mean I'm sure you've run into peoplethat you can tell when they're giving in more of a smarmes. The only word Ican think of right, they're, giving because they're waiting to get itrather hand genuinely wanting to help someone when people can feel that theycan key off of that, and I think today the you know, people buy from people isan even more powerful statement than it was ten years ago, especially with allan attack, so the gree that to see that work, an that authenticity, that'sthat's amazing, so I got to have a cold call story. Give me a great cold callstory that we haven't seen on Linkdin, yet yeah, so I'm going to actually I'mGoin a poll from a conversation I had to day, and so first I want to. I wantto give a shout out so by boy travishmidt, one of the things that he talked about today with me at ourlunch and he works for Brawdan Brown insurance. You know just little plugfor him, but he talked to me today about at lunch about what he's doingdifferently in order to to get a prospect to kind of turn their headand and I'm going to use an example he gave me today is kind of my my talking point and actually, when Ithink of its conversation, the first story that comes to mind is when I wentand I called on a gun manufacturers. I'd never called on a manufacturer atall this point in my career and to pick a gun manufactureris, probably not thebrightest idea, especially with my inconvincenonconventional ways of doing Cole...

...calls. But what I did is I went out andI bought a little toy, an nerfe gun, okay and and then I bought like a casethat I could put the gun in, and it looked a little legit right. The casethat this particular location for this gunmanufacture they actually they took in weapons that they would buy andand they because this particular owner of this weapons manufacturer had a guncollection and I had kind of heard rumors about it. So I walked in on a cold call and said youknow. I have a gun that I'd like the owner to look at, and so it was kind of it was almostembarrassing to be honest with ou SAS. I'v Never done anything like this, andI was I was kind of freaked out and and when th the individual did come out. Icame out with one of his his right. Handmen who's actually become one of mybest friends N in the world of business and they walked out, and I introducedmyself and I said okay now, I don't want you all to freak out when you seethis thing, because it's pretty awesome and I popped it open D and they justkind of looked at each other and looked at me like what is this and I startedto explain to them, though, what why I was here like the real purposeessentially and why I wanted them to look at the gun, because I said: listen,not everybody can can carry a firearm in their office so that when the copierstarts to act up, you know they can't just just discharge that firearm in theofficet. But I'm thinking of developing you know a weapon like this one, where,when someone's frustrated at their copy machine, they can pull it out and theycan just kind of shoot a couple F darts into it and get their frustrations outand go ith about their day. And I'm telling you there was like a solid fiveseconds. Go that silence an I just sat there and stared at both of them andand one of them looked uvat me and said: Are you for real and from there he put two and twotogether? Basically, I was like so you're a coffee ourselvesmand I said,and if this isn't, the best call call that you've ever gotten from a copierguy, then I'll quit my job tomorrow and they started busting out laughing andthey gave me a tour of the facility they became my customer about. I don'tknow two or three weeks later and in my industry a turnaround on a deal isusually months, if not years you don't just walk in somewhere and get a sale.But you know what I found that when I would do things that were a littleunconventional and different, and that was those were my days back when Ireally didn't have access to the kind of Marketin that I do now. Sothat was just me going to the store and building this thing right, but ow. Iencourage everybody to do it, though, because you know the big thing that itdoes for you. Is it kind of breaks the ice for yourself, like you, think inyour head man? I got all these great ideas to make myself successful, buthow many of us actually practiced what what we think and so just taking thatleap of faith for yourself than on yourself and believing that, even if the particular person you meet that day,when you do something off, the wall doesn't like what you showed them thatit. You know it doesn't matter, because it's a learning piece right, you get soyou get to hear from the Horse's mouth just what they didn't like about it orwhat they did and, but you know Chad. The thing is: Is that ninety ninepercent of the time people love it, and so why not? Why are we so scared to getoutside of our comfort zone and do something different that that turnsheads yeah? I just can't understand it. So I'm with you, I with O, but that bringsus to habits. So if we look at, if you look at the habits like what threehabits do you feel would make sales people more effective if they wouldjust embrace them, sounds like one would be getting aut out of yourcomfort zone. For sure I mean I would say, the first would definitely be tojust jump out of that little bubble that you've created for yourself andtry different things, whether it's on...

...the phone, it's an in person cold callit's during a discovery session with a new client. It's during an upgrade withan account that you've had for ten years. Think of things that will helpdevelop the relationship further make you stand out of the crowd, because atall times someone else is out there doing what you're doing and most of thetime in the same manner that you are, and so it's a tossup between you andthem. It's literal luck in some cases you know. Maybe the front desk personjust liked the way that gentlemen or that lady looked compared to you and soshe's, let them buy. I mean. Why are we letting that define who we are asalespeople? You know let's get out there and be different and get outsideof our bubble. I'd say the second would be would be time management, a bigpiece, I think, to sells habits for people or that a lot of sales peoplejust say: Oh I'm too busy, I'm so busy a had a busy day. Oh, I didn't get timeto do this, or do that you get. You got to really just accept that time isalways fleeting and that you're never going to have it, but to structure yourday and to use a time management approach to everything you do even if awrench gets thrown in and you've got a fire to put out or a customer call or aprospect, calls and says: Hey, come sign me up, you know, and it's ahundred thousanddollar deal remember to keep in mind at all times that timemanagement is so important during your day that, as you get patternedinterrupts inside of what's normal to you, you know if you're managing yourtime correctly, it's no skin off your bones right and so being focused onthat as a big piece yeah. The third advice O meal, a lot of people, givepretty generic advice on sales, culture and and and sells habits, but I mean Ijust like to think differently than other people and so that timemanagement a lot of people talk about that, but just think of it differentlyright. They think about your time management to be more than just how youare stretching your day, but how it serves the people that you'reinteracting with as well you've got to take yourself out of the picture to adegree right. You still need to be thinking about you and, what's best foryou, but you got to take yourself out. You got to put yourself in the customershoes you got to have the mindset of being an advisor and serving so you Kow. The third thing that I would say that that, as a habit that people needto start doing, sales people need to start doing. is they need to stopthinking of cells as a nine to five or an eight to five Monday through Friday,you are selling at all times when you're out on the golf course onSaturday, with your buddies, an and the force them in front of you is takingforever and you're sitting back complaining yeah. I challenge everybodyLes's any of this to ride up to those guys and they're, probably going to belike, Oh God, you know what's happening, but just introduce yourself. What's upguys my name's Dale, I'm the copyor warrior just saw the Yoler pretty closeto us and wanted to say hello. You know be be who you want? U W yourself to beas a salesperson from the success standpoint at all times during yourpersonal life right, you know with your family, with your friends witheverybody I mean I'm constantly selling, I go, have lunch and meet a waiter, andI before I leave that dudes addidg me on Linkdon. I guarantee you. Oh that's perfect, so last part of thiswould be. How do you stay motivated sales? S? Is the roller coaster. I'veseen it chew up and spit out a lot of people you're at you know high highhighs and really low lows. How do you stay motivated? How do you maintainthat positive outlook yeah it this one's, not easy, and I don't think thatmy answer Wi will help everyone and I don't think anybody's answer will helpeveryone, because we all have our own unique situations. Okay and- but Ithink one thing that we need to remember is that raw human emotionexists in all of us. The same that when you, when you're at your lowest, it'snot much different than the other guys low, you know it really isn't so.There's other people out there that are in your situation, so havingaccountability is a big piece of how I keep myself on that just accelerationpath at all times, even when I'm in the...

...lowest point. But I'll tell you rightnow that the biggest piece for me that keeps me going is my legacy ind, myfather, the things that he accomplished and that he set forth for me to be ableto come in and and continue is so important to me, I mean probably moreimportant than most things in my life from aperspective of family and friendship and just a general culture of loving onthose around me like what my dad did for me changed me to the point that Ibelieve I owe him every second of my life to constantly be the best Ipossibly can be until the day that I take my last breath. Wow. That's that'sa powerful, that's power, that's extremely powerful and extremelyadmirable, quite frankly to hear that. So I appreciate you sharing that so, atthe end of every interview, we ask our guess one similar question: We call itour acceleration insight and so there's been a lot of great perspectives andtips and tricks and hints throughout the conversation. But if there was onething, just one piece of advice you could give to a sales professionaltonight and if they took it in and embraced it and startedpratiing, it's more one piece of advice that you believe would make them better.What would it be and why I would tell every single person- and Ido tell every single person- that's that start practicing integrity. Don'tdon't just don't just have it in your. We repetoirright, don't put it in your list of top ten things that you are as a leadermake it number one make it the focal point of who you are on a daily basiswhen you operate with integrity, everybody notices it from yourcustomers to the people in your office that are on your team to the guy. Thatwas across the way from you filling up his gas tank in the morning, becauseyour attitude will be that of you know a very bright and shining human being.That will cause a rift in your life of success that you won't even know how tohandle. ND and honestly integrity is not hard to have right and there's alot of people talk about integrity, as you know, being moral, morally, soundand principle right. But the word I like inside of integrity is honor. Ithink that that is a powerful word and that F. If people looked at the wordhonor and the word virtue more seriously, when they think of integrity,they would understand, I think, a little bit deeper. What it is that theyneed to accomplish through integrity on a daily basis and their own personallife and habits, and how it resounds out to the masses that they're going tobe touching on a daily and a weekly and a Monthlyan a yearly and a decade basis.It's something that if they change in their life tomorrow and and fromwriting a proposal to cold calling someone to having a conversation in theoffice practice integrity and you will be themost successful human being on the face of this earth and there'll be a lot ofus. If we all do it, let's start that club up now yeah exactly perfect Dal.Thank you very much. If, if the listeners interested in talking moreabout the topics we touched on today, what's the best way for them to get intouch with you yeah, so they can reach out to me on my website copy orwarriorcom. I've got my cell phone, my personal email. They can find methrough Zeno office solutions in Orlando as well, and definitely checkout the company that I represent, we're one of the top copyor dealerships inthe state of Florida, and if anybody is looking for helpingadvice outside of you know, just get ing in touch with me. That waydefinitely find me on Linkedin. You can find me on Lin Dhennis, Dal deprey thecopy or warrior a and fallow my content, because I post every day and- and I donot prescript it. So it's in the moment, raw motion, commethentic, yeah, rightss, exactly soso come n and have fun with us and get...

...your learning on it'll be it'll, besomething that hopefully will be lifechanging for you. That's my goal.EXLE whathey again, I can't think you Knoug, for taking the time day it'sbeen great having you on the show. Thay Shald appreciate the time all right,everyone that does it for this episode, please check us out at wwwb. Revizecomshare the episode with friends, Families Coworkers. If you like whatyou hear, leave us review on itunes shoot me an email. Let me know ifthere's a topic or guest you'd like us to have on the show want to make surethis is continually valuable for you guys until next time we value primesolutions with you all nothing, but the greatest success you've been listening to the btobrevenue executive experience to ensure that you never miss an episodesubscribe to the show in Itunes for your favorite podcast player. Thank youso much for listening until next time.

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