The B2B Revenue Executive Experience
The B2B Revenue Executive Experience

Episode · 1 year ago

Culture & Diversity: Stop Talking About It & Do Something. w/ Derek Young

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Does your website say you hate certain types of people? 

 

Probably not. I’m willing to bet it says you value diversity.

 

But those are just words. Actions are what matter. 

 

It’s time to get serious about culture and diversity and make it a part of your organization’s central strategy.

 

To help explain how, I turned to Derek Young (who goes by D. Y. ), Culture Strategist at Derek Young Speaks and Author of Make My Hindsight Your 20/20, who has been on the frontlines fighting for diversity for over 20 years. 

 

In this episode, we discuss:

 

- The 3 biggest mistakes to avoid when building your culture

 

- Why accountability means consequences

 

- How to live the values you claim on your website

 

This post includes highlights of our podcast interview with Derek Young, Culture Strategist at Derek Young Speaks and Author of Make My Hindsight Your 20/20.

 

For the entire interview, you can listen to The B2B Revenue Executive Experience. If you don’t use Apple Podcasts, we suggest this link.

Accountability without consequence is only conversation.You're listening to the BDB revenue executive experience, a podcast dedicated to helping executives traintheir sales and marketing teams to optimize growth. Whether you're looking for techniquesand strategies or tools and resources, you've come to the right place. Let'saccelerate your growth in three, two, one. Welcome everyone to the BBrevenue executive experience. I'm your host, Chad Sanderson. Today we're talking aboutculture and diversity, not with cute one liners, repacked over and bellish flufffor sob stories that have no relevance, but with an individual who's been onthe front lines of shaping both for over twenty years. We're lucky to havewith US Derek Young, goes by D why, has sought after business coachand public speaker, former head of corporate social responsibility for dollar general and thefirst leader of diversity inclusion for cracker barrel and author of make my hindsight yourtwo thousand and twenty. Derek, do you want, dear? How I'mgoing to flip back and forth. D Why. Thank you very much fortaking the time and being on the show. Hey, Dad, thank you andhey feel totally comfortable with that because as a person with four kids,I callumn each other all the time and I love them. That's all thatcounts. It's what cop that is accounts all right. So we always liketo start with kind of a just nice breaker question, and we've all beenspend a more time at home than any of us probably ever planned. Wouldlove to know if the extra time at home has allowed you to reconnect witha passion or a hobby or do something or stay focused on something that maybeyou hadn't had as much time with before. So that is a phenomenal question andthe answer is pick yes. I I have been saying for two decadesthat I was going to put my programs. I have over eighty seven training programsthat I provide to my clients and I've been saying for twenty years Iwas going to start putting my sessions online, online, online. I travel somuch I just have never well,...

...in the first three months of thepandemic I think I put twenty six programs online that are available on my website. Derek Young Speakscom so I just had no more excuses and I had tomake it happen, and so, yes, it's amazing what we've do to fillthe time. And as much as we all love our family and welove the time that it allows us to have with them and dinners, there'sthat, you know, too much of a good thing. Sometimes you needa little break from so it's great to have those things that you can doto distract and stay focused on other elements of our existence. That's exactly right. All right, so let's jump in. How did you become so passionate aboutculture, diversity and really the difference between mentorship and sponsorship? You know, I am a person who believes in the word that you should pursue yourcalling in life, and I know that's not a word we use a lotAmerica in particular. For me, though, check calling is about that broader impactthat you're uniquely equipped to make, and what I found in my experience, first as an auditor economic research analyst at the Federal Reserve, the indas a communication analyst at sprint and then as a career development manager at inroads. What I begin to see, working with my organization and anyone elseI worked with, is that the culture was really what dictated overall, notjust profitability and sustainability, but just the person's love for the experience of goingto work every day. And there's that legendary quote from Peter Druker that cultureeats strategy for breakfast. Yeah, well, at the fat when I did economicresearch, that's where I learned how to do strategic planning on really big, large scale organization. What was struck me is that what we really needis culture strategies. So in my view,...

...when culture and strategy eat together,that's actually the best meal you could have, because I think it's whereyou produced the greatest outcome. So that's more in from an organizational look atculture individually, you and I as leaders, you and I is people who wantto make positive things happen. Obviously we benefit from the advice, tocounsel the perspective of other people. So it's sort of like we're sort ofdeveloping our own little personal culture, if you will. Well, everybody knowswhat a mentory is, right. A mentor, and this is me beingshort and sweet, advises and connects. Right, I sit down with Chad, he gives me some tips, I run a few things by him.He says, Hey, you need to meet Charlotte Charlotte is phenomenal in banking. She really give you some good tips. That's mentoring, connecting advising. Sponsors. On the other hand, sponsors are one level above mentors because theyplace and protect. Sponsors are the people who look at your career, whohave the level of influence and sometimes flat out power, where they can dictateyour next opportunity. They can say to someone, even though she's green,we're going to go ahead and let her do that role for another six tonine months so she can get better at it. So where people are intheir career. I talked about this in my book, where people are intheir career, mentors tend to happen a little bit more organically. Sponsors tendto happen totally organically, in my experience, meaning it's sometimes easier to sort ofseek someone as a mentor, but in my experience Chad sponsors in manycases wind up picking you based on the kind of minty you've been. Ilove that differentiation right because it's subtle, but it's important. Then and I'veand as I think back over my own career, my own life, Ican definitely start to see the difference between those mentors and those the sponsors,the ones that kind of took me under...

...their wing and I wasn't even surewhy they were doing it, but it was. It turned out to beextremely beneficial relationship as we went through it. And so, when we look atat organizations that are focused on mean culture and diversity is a primary focusfor a lot of organizations today. I'm curious what you've seen working with someof your clients. Some of the challenges are mistakes that they're making when itcomes to approaching culture and diversity? Yeah, so this is my thirty year workingin this space of diversity, equity and inclusion. Obviously, Chad withthe wake up call that America had this summer. I have seen an explosionin the number of organizations, and I'm talking about education, corporations, government, I'm talking about every sector, where people are saying, we have justhad a wakeup call, we have got to get better. Here are someof the biggest, quote unquote, mistakes I see people making. Number one, they don't link their commitment to D and I to the strategy of theorganization. Clearly, you put a group of executives in a room you sayhere's where we want to be as an organization in three to five years.So you strategize that, but to not connect the diversity, equitting inclusion effortto it is a bit kind of outlandish, because diversity, equity inclusion, tome, are the gateway to get everybody more engaged, to get everybodyto have a sense of ownership. Secondly, what I find is when a lotof organizations try to start these initiatives they get to gimmicky and they gettoo focused on events rather than talking about real leadership skills that people can beginto apply so that they leverage of the diversity of their team they are moreinclusive. And then number three, and I'll share one more after that,is they don't use one of my age old platitudes, and it is thisaccountability without consequence is only conversation. What...

...do I mean by that? Atthe end of the day, in an organization, if someone experiences a racist, a sexist and ages statement or situation, they ultimately want to know that youwill number one, you will protect them. Number two, you willdefend them. And how do you do that? You do that by deliveringcorrective consequences to anyone who would violate the values of a CO worker or ateammate or an employee, so to say. That simply one of the major mistakesI see organizations make, and this is what I help my clients notdo, and that is they don't have that top down, cascading commitment toconsequences that are corrective for a behavior that destroys diversity, equity and inclusion.The last thing I'll tell you that I see is a really big mistake isin people's zest for D and I in people's desire to see that be areality. Chat they do so much talking about what diversity is, what inclusionis, what equity is, but they don't do enough of showing the phenomenaltalent, skill and impact of anybody who does not look like what maybe yournormal or traditional employee looks like. Those would be some of the biggest thingsthat I'm usually working to help companies organizations overcome. Well, and that's andthat's a big one. Right the the talking about it without action. Rights. We're going to talk about it, we're not. We're not going todo anything different. And some people have, I seen, have a tendency tothink just because I'm talking about it means I'm taking positive action. Butno, that just means you're filling a room with hot air. You're notdoing anything, and it's more of it's less about I mean the words areimportant, but in the organizations it seems to be about the actions, andI really like that. The platitude, the accountability portion of it. Ithink there's a challenge sometimes for people to understand what is appropriate corrective, behavioral, you know, approaches to that. Some people would probably say, okay, well, depending on the like,...

...how do you rate it or howdo you scale the particular situation? It's all very sensitive. It's all veryraw right now, especially because of the summer, as you've mentioned, andit's sensitive, as it should be. Should be approached with respect and Ithink it starts, you know, as you pointed out, starts with theindividuals, and the individuals in each organization is kind of work. Starts.Starts with that that value in that culture. But there's always these little voices inthe back of People's head. So how do you help organizations overcome whatyou know is probably the unspoken uncertainty? That's some really just stuff, becauseyou're hitting at what. Sometimes there's the issue and this is what we helpour clients figure out. One of my very good friends, one of thepeople I admire most in the United States, is David Rouchi, is the directorof the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation, the TBI, and one of hisemployees was taking me on a tour of what they call the infusion center,and that is that sort of high tech room where they taken data from allover the world, all over the country, all over the state, that relatesto crimes that they are investigating. Well, as I was taking thetour chat I saw a screen and had a bunch of red dots on itand I said what, what, what's that? And they said that's oursex trafficking board. Now, notice they didn't say that's our board where wecapture those instances where someone might have possibly come up on a young person ora young woman and kidnapped her and now is using her for horrible illegal purposes. No, they called it what it was. What I have found isthat all these issues, when we think about the E and I, canbe situational right, but we all know how we feel if someone commits amicroaggression against us. So what I've said to my clients is let's just turnthe camera around and say. Now it's someone else's turn. They have broughtto you how they feel they have been micro aggressed, if you will,against so let's just play this out.

If this person defrauded the customer,what would you do? If this person committed sexual harassment, what would youdo? My point is what I teach is let's just use other values violationsas our example, as our guide to say how do we handle those things? Again, to your point, all these are going to be situational.But here's what begins to happen, Chad, number one precedent start being set.That's one, and number two messages start being sent. Hey, gang, you can't get away with that anymore. Hey, it might behoo view notto say that joke again. So my point is sort of the hazeof it all, I think, can sometimes best be handled if we justlook at similar values violations and how we responded and then we just store inessence, sort of publicized not that individual but the decision, so that thatPo will effect is created and people get a sense of what should never happenedin here when I think that's I think that's an extremely intelligent way to takethe unfamiliar make it familiar, right. So that's exactly that we're used to. We have these other value based decisions that we make every day. Everybodymakes them, and because of the emotional charge that is in some of theseother areas, why it doesn't have to you that different. It's still avalues based erosion, so to speak, her paint and do you see,and I bring this out this is very topical, because I was just talkingto a a colleague friend who is a female and was expressing she works inthe I will not name company names, which she works in a construction typecompany, and she was illustrating a situation that was like over the top sexualharassment, like just ridiculous. And I'm curious, if we started having aconversation, if you see it different at different levels of acceptance and investment inD and I based on industry. Are...

...some industries dragging their feet, soto speak? Do you see or, because it has been so heightened overthe last six eight months, is it really just a tidal wave that's justgoing through businesses as a whole? Really great question to in my so I'mgoing to take thirty years and six months and sort of put them together.Right, I would tell you my thirty year career say is more often thannot, organizations that are high customer front facing are where you're more often thannot going to see that greater and longer term commitment to D and I right, because they are dealing with customers. But that more back in business wherethe quote unquote general public never even interfaces with that company. That is historicallymaybe where I've seen less of a commitment to it. So that's generally speakingnow, based on what I've seen in two thousand and twenty I've seen anuprise in practically every different sector. I mean I've been very fortunate. Itellied it up one day and when you take all the industries and sort ofsubindustries that exist in the US, I've worked in forty eight different industries withall sorts of organizations, from mom and POPs to, as I say,at the Federal Reserve Bank, which was three hundred billion and assets in theS. work there all right, but the point is what I'll tell youis my view of it. is every organization that has on its website negativeterms, a weight that doesn't exist, does it? Nobody's website say yep, people stink and we don't have nothing to do with them. We judgeat the door based on what color your skin is. Nobody. No,everybody's values are wonderful and violinish. Right point is then, Chet, ifyou were willing to put vie violinish value is on your website, you shouldbe willing to focus on diversity, equity inclusion, because, guess they whatthey are one in the same diversity says...

I care about the unique perspective andpotential of every human being in this organization, regardless of if they're a blue shirtwere or glassware or salt and pepper bearder. You know those salt memberbearders jet so. So if you're willing to say that we are we valuecaring, couldmit met respect all these beautiful words. It means you've got tosay we also value diversity, equity and include. Absolutely. And so therewas a phrase when we were getting when we were preparing, going back andforth, seat belt session, and I don't know what that is, whata seat belt session is, but I would be curious to know. Isthis something that you run your clients through? Is it? Is it part ofthe approach? Helped me, help me have some context with it,because it sounds amazing. I just want to make sure I know exactly whatwe're talking about. Oh, I had it as a term, but I'lltell you how it came up. When I was a dollar general, Igot four promotions in seven years. I feel like grant cardme. My incomehad a ten X, but I had a Tenex on my income during thattime. And again, dollar general was a phenomenal work experience for me.When I got that fourth promotion, a guy who was not on my teambut a guy I was familiar with, sort of appear. He just walkedinto my office. He didn't have a meeting or anything, and it's awhole long story, but ultimately said to me, he said, man,what you doing? Man, every time I look up you get another promotion. He's like, this is crazy, I've never seen anybody get promoted likethis. What are you doing? And I said, deep built session,what I say? Yeah, every quarter I meet with my mentor sponsor,whose name Bob, and I sit in a chair and I put on animaginary seat belt. Now I ask the question, Bob, what do Ineed to fix? And for the next thirty, sixty, sometimes ninety minutes, Bob blast me with truth, conjecture,...

...perceptions people have about me that Imay not be aware of, sometimes flat out lies. People have toldon me chat the stink belt and I said what I do is I takeit. I don't defend myself, I don't explain it away, I justtake notes and I creatively clarify what he said. Once the thrashing is over, take off the seat belt and I do three things. Number One,I try to do everything Bob said, starting with the stuff I hate anddisagree with the most. Number two, as soon as I have success withwhat Bob told me, I thank him profusely. Number three, after Ihave thanked Bob, I teach what I learned to other people, and it'ssubmits within me. Now if you were to go back and interview a hundredpeople I work with the dollar general, all one hundred of them could say, well, me, why didn't do this or he'd never was good atthat, he screwed this up, and I will go go yep, yeah, at that seat built session help me focus on the things that were mostimportant in the eyes of my sponsor, and that's was what I felt wasa key to my rapid rise. It well, and that is an approachthat I think anybody can benefit from, because in order to pull those off, in order to make those actionable, in order to hear the feedback andinternalize that, you have to be in a place where you have believe yoursponsor is coming at you with positive intent, that they're not there to tear youdown. There there to increase awareness. You also have to be strong enoughin character to accept that some other people's perceptions maybe their reality, butnot necessarily reality shared by many, and that has to be adjust as well. That's those character traits I think serve anyone well, not only in businessbut indeed in indiversity and in equity and inclusion. You have to be willingto look at what are you doing to...

...contribute to it, whether it isyour perception or someone else's, and accept that and I think that's a hugeskill set that many people could benefit it from, hopefully something you get theopportunity to teach your clients. Yeah, it's one of the key topics inmy book because it has been a game changer for people I've been sharing thatwith for over twenty years. And two points, just as a carryover fromwhat you said. You know, one of the things I talked about withmy clients as a relations to diversity Atqu need inclusion, especially in two thousandand twenty. Is that the murderer of George Floyd in the midst of thepandemic, with the other nationally recognized murders that had taken place of black citizens, created in a lot of black people. In my opinion, this is onedude's opinion. A I've been dealing with this for years but I've neverhad the courage to talk about it. So all around America, black employees, black students started to talk about not the love they have for the organization, but those bad experiences again, those racist moments, those microaggressions. Toyour very point, chat about having the maturity in the security as a leaderto hear that kind of thing. It's what I call the ninety five fiverule, and what that means is ninety five percent of my experience was great. Loved it here, treated with respect, treated as a member of the team, really not like I belong. But that five percent where somebody shutme out, where I overheard a conversation where somebody clearly said we don't wantany people of color to be on the leadership team. where I know fora fact that some of them, my white cohorts, were having their ideaslisten to and pumped up, but my ideas were being ignored. See ifyou can to have the real maturity of...

...a leader, to advance or transformyour culture, you got to be willing to accept my five percent in thesame way you accept my ninety five percent. And these are key points. Chatone, especially if you would never contribute to my five percent. Oneof the things I find is people who would go, I would never dosomething racist, I would never do something discriminatory, and they almost shut downin being able to accept that. Will. You probably wouldn't or haven't, butthat person sure did right in late. You've got to be able to acceptmy hundred percent because by telling me, well, D why look at theninety five percent, come on, validates me as a total person.Even though you're only invalidating part of my experience, you're still invalidating me asa total person. And then, lastly, Chad, it also says I don'tsee you for the totality of what you experience. I see you forthat piece of you which gives me comfort, which gives me peace of mind.And once again, all those components from a seat built standpoint, interms of really hearing herd feedback, will transform a person, will transform aperson's relationship with their employees and obviously, if you expand it right, willexpand a team, a department and maybe even a whole organization. Yeah,it's a phenomenal it's a phenomenal exercise in understanding how to recognize that. Ilike that we're totally this totality of another person through their experiences. It doesn'tmean because they're expressing they had the experience, they're denigrating you. It's just thisis the experience they had, so to so to not give it thesame weight you would your own experiences is that dismissive approach which is part ofthe problem. So getting back to that place where you can truly be comfortableself assessing or having a sponsor or mentor help you self assessed. There's alot of people that have that little voice...

...in their head they go scrun andscreaming out the door because they don't want to admit that and I have tobelieve that's got to be a challenge. As these organizations embraced, and Ithey're going to have some ripples for, I don't know, lack of betterword, some some people that just don't know how to handle it. Haveyou seen that in some of the organizations you've worked with? I have,and well, I've got a session I do call framing your leadership legacy andI present fifteen different little for or Vignett components of what I think a personwho maybe is new to leadership or wants to get better at leadership can beginto learn from our use as a base. One of those little for prong componentis that leadership comes down the four things modeling, teaching, promoting andprotected. And what I found in my experience chat is that what tends tobe the greatest weakness, the greatest limitation, is that fourth one, protecting.That's once again that holding people accountable. Well, for so much of thework I do, I basically say to the leadership, I want tohelp you, but let's just go ahead before we sign an agreement. Ifyou aren't willing to model, teach, mote and protect these values, Idon't even want to take your money like that because it's going to be awaste of time. I'll still get paid, but your organization isn't going to change, because we all know the speed of the leader determines the speed ofthe group. So that, for me, is the key thing. Is whenthe leadership says I'm going to model what it means to demonstrate that,yes, I have unconscious biases that have maybe negatively impacted how I do whatI do. I'm going to work on that. I'm going to show youthe progress. Hey, I as a leader, I'm going to set youdown as my direct reports, my executive team or my manager team or myregional team, and walk you through one too one plans on how you aregoing to now work on your own biases,...

...how you are going to be moreproactive, including in, including people you haven't done so historically. Sothat, ultimately, is the key to any change in an organization is thatthe leaders first model it. The leaders are willing to teach it the leadersnot just once, not just after dwise workshop, but over the next eighteento thirty six months. Because what I say to my clients, Champ,is this is my thirty five year working with large organization. My experience ittakes eighteen months to change a culture and another eighteen months to fully incocate thosechanges, because Chad the verse. Eighteen months people will kind of going,they're gone. You know, they're still talking about this stuff. Give it, they're still doing it. So it takes about three years and one guy'sexperience to change. When I'm so what I mean by that is we werethis in two thousand and twenty we are this in two thousand and twenty three. Not We're becoming, but the change in my experience is eighteen, twenty, four, thirty six, a month process. So that's why, again, that model teach, promote, protect has to start at the top.Yeah, I love it. I love it. I could go on withI mean, I could talk to you for hours on this, but outof respect for four time, you got to start wrapping us up. Weask all of our guess two standard questions at the end of every interview.And you, as a sought after public speaker, author, you know,change agent for this stuff. You. That means you're also a prospect.No doubt you're getting prospected to other people think they've got something, they wantto do business with you. I'm always curious if somebody doesn't have a trustedreferral into you, like somebody you trust brings them in the door. Ifthey don't have that, how does somebody capture your attention and earn the rightto time on your calendar? What works best for you? So that's areally, really, really important question. I just was talking with my wifeyesterday who started our consulting practice eighteen years...

...ago. Now. My wife isin the chaplain, so she still works in the organization but she's primarily focusedon her duties as a champlain. But we were saying we are giving peoplenaturally. So the more giving someone is, the list technique you have to beget with them right, and also the more giving someone is and themore they have the time to give, because the other very variable might beyou had you're very giving, but your time is really short. So thethree things that stand out to me when I think about this question our numberone, does the person personalized what they are sharing through their observation of you, through their study of you, their research of you, or am Ijust getting the standard? I would like to meet you other human being.I wonder if we can build apridge from that right. So is it?Is it personalized ory? Is it's sort of robotic? Secondly, to whatdegree is it short and sweet there's nothing. When I say worst, they're clearlythings worse, but it's a phrase we obviously use, but there's nothingworse. And someone with a sixteen paragraph introduction about who they are and wherethey came from and they went to school with Abraham Lincoln's like look, man, okay, great, president, yeah, right, okay, get to thepoint. So how can you say what you want to say to aperson you've never met? And then I think the third example or third point, Chad for me, is how do you tie into something that has acollective or share significance, again based on what you know, based on whatyou presume about that person, versus just that being a one way thing,either one way for you or one way for them, and just one littlecave at three as never use. I'd like to pick your brain. Justgo ahead and delete that from your vernacular, because that just sounds gross and itjust speaks. I think it's a phrase that we've used for a longtime in America at least, but it just almost says I wouldn't get somethingfrom you and I just wouldn't recommend using...

...that. I love it. That'sextremely practical advice. And so, all right, last question. We callit our acceleration and say, if there was one piece of advice you couldgive to organization, professional, sales, marketing, whatever, one piece ofadvice, just one that, if they live and you believe, would helpthem achieve where exceed their targets, what would it be and why it wouldbe to its three parts. Go to Derek store that Derek Young SPEAKSCOM purchase, make, my hindsight, your two thousand and twenty and take the actionplan template at the back of each chapter as serious as you did your Undergrador your grand degree. In that book. What I do is I say whathappens to people Chad, they read books, they go to seminars,as they go to the podcast. But here's what they don't do, andthis is going to sound almost too simplistic. When you get a nugget, yougo. I like that. I need that. Two things. Schedule, the day and time and event where you're going to apply it. IfI've helped over probably five hundred people get promotion since I've been doing this kindof work for thirty years, it is a game change. Nice. LoveIt, do you? I? Where do you want? So obviously thewebsite. Is there any place else? You want us to send them somewhereyou would like? People who want more information want to get in touch withyou. What's where do you want us to send them? We want tomake sure you get some bang for the buck on us. Appreciate that thebest place to go is right to the website, because that's where you're goingto see my story. I tell my story Chad by talking about a conceptgive people their flowers before they die, and in sharing that in my website. It's on the about Dytab, people will see just some of the peoplethat I am thanking for having a positive impact on my life. But Ithink when you get to kind of see a person's background and how they feelabout their background, it clues you into...

...the real calling that they have.So Derek Young Speakscom Chad would be the best place for people to go tofind out more, but to get the book just as a shortcut. StoreDot. Derek Young speakscom excellent do. I can't thank you enough for takingthe time to be on the show again. I'm sorry we had to reschedule butreally truly appreciate sticking with it. I've really enjoyed this conversation. Wantto thank you for your time. Thank you, and I will tell youthis. A lot of people are podcasting, a lot of people are sharing,but your level of questioning, the depth, the this bestificity, thequality of your questions chat are off the chain, man. I appreciate that. I appreciate that a lot. All right, all right, everybody thatdoes it for this episode. You know, the drill be to be REV exactcomnobody's going out anywhere. So share with your friends, family, Coworkers. Hell, make your kids listen to it. Leave us a reviewon itunes. Until next time. We have value selling associates. We Shawall nothing but the greatest success. You've been listening to the BB revenue executiveexperience. To ensure that you never miss an episode, subscribe to the showingitunes or your favorite podcast player. Thank you so much for listening. Untilnext time.

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