The B2B Revenue Executive Experience
The B2B Revenue Executive Experience

Episode · 1 year ago

Culture & Diversity: Stop Talking About It & Do Something. w/ Derek Young

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Does your website say you hate certain types of people? 

 

Probably not. I’m willing to bet it says you value diversity.

 

But those are just words. Actions are what matter. 

 

It’s time to get serious about culture and diversity and make it a part of your organization’s central strategy.

 

To help explain how, I turned to Derek Young (who goes by D. Y. ), Culture Strategist at Derek Young Speaks and Author of Make My Hindsight Your 20/20, who has been on the frontlines fighting for diversity for over 20 years. 

 

In this episode, we discuss:

 

- The 3 biggest mistakes to avoid when building your culture

 

- Why accountability means consequences

 

- How to live the values you claim on your website

 

This post includes highlights of our podcast interview with Derek Young, Culture Strategist at Derek Young Speaks and Author of Make My Hindsight Your 20/20.

 

For the entire interview, you can listen to The B2B Revenue Executive Experience. If you don’t use Apple Podcasts, we suggest this link.

Accountability without consequence isonly conversation you're listening to the DTB revenueexecutive experience, a podcast, dedicated EALAN executives, train theirsales and marketing teams to optimize growth, whether you're looking fortechniques and strategies, ore tools and resources, you come to the rightplace. Let's accelerate your growth in three to one. Welcome E, you one to thebtob revenue executive experience. I'm your host Chad Sanderson today we'retalking about culture and diversity, not with Cte one liners repacked overembellish, fluff or SOB stores that have no relevance but with anindividual who's been on the front lines of shaping both for over twentyyears, we're lucky to have with us. Derick young goes by dyas Saud, afterbusiness, coach and public speaker, formerhead of corporate socialresponsibility for dollar general and the first leader of diversity,inclusion for cracker, rail and author of make my hindsight your two thousandand twenty there do. You want dear Ow, I'm going to flip back and forth Dou Wy.Thank you very much for taking the time of being on the show. I Dad thank youand hey feel totally comfortable with that, because, as a person with fourkids, I call Thom each other all the time Finei. I know I love them. That'sall that counts a its. What counts! That is a counts all right, so wealways like to start with kind of just nice, breaker question and we've allbeen spending more time at home than any of us, probably ever planned, wouldlove to know if the extra time at home has allowed you to reconnect with apassion or a hobby or do something or stay focused on something that maybeyou hadn't had as much time with before Tso. That is a phenomenal question andthe answer is pick yes. I have been saying for two decades thatI was going to put my programs. I have over eighty seven training programsthat I provide to my clients and I've been saying for twenty years. I wasgoing to start putting my sessions online online online. I travel so much.I just have never well in the first...

...three months of the pandemic, I think Iput twenty six programs online that are available on my website. There areyoung Speakscom, so I just had no more excuses an had to make it happen, manfor. Yes,it's amazing what we've do to fill the time and as much as we all love ourfamily and we love the time that it allows us to have with them and dinners.There's you know too much a good thing. Sometimes, U need a little break fromso it's great to have those things that you can do to distract and stay focuson other elements of our existence. That's exactly right! All Right! So,let's jump in. How did you become so passionate about culture, diversity andreally the the difference between mentorship and sponsorship? You know Iam a person who believes in the word that you should pursue your calling inlife, and I know that's not a word. We use a lot in America in particular. Forme, though, ceck calling is about that broader impact that you're, uniquelyequipped to mate and what I found in my experience.First, as an auditor economic research analyst at the fidal reserves, the inas a communication analyst at sprint and then as a career developmentmanager at enroads. What I' begin to see working with my organization andanyone else I worked with- is that the culture was really what dictatedoverall, not just profitability and sustainability, but just the personslove for the experience of going to work every day and there's thatlegendary quote from Peter drunker that culture eats strategy for breakfastyeah well at the Fay, when I did economic research, that's where Ilearned how to do strategy planning on really big large scale organization.Well, what struck me is that what we really need is culture strategies. So,in my view, when culture and strategy...

...eat together, that's actually the bestmeal you could have, because I think it's where you produce the greatestoutcome. So that's more from an organizational look at cultureindividually. You and eys leaders you anizes people who want to make positivethings happen. Obviously, we benefit from the advice to council theperspective of other people, so it's sort of like we're sort of developingour own little personal culture. If you will well, everybody knows what amentory is right. A mintor- and this is me being short and sweet, advises andconnects right. I said down with chat. He gives me some tips. I've run a fewthings by him. He says: Hey you need to meet Charlotte Charlotte is phenomenal,and banking she'll really give you some good tips, that's a mentoringconnecting advising sponsors. On the other hand, sponsors are one levelabove metoris because they place and protect. Sponsors are the people wholook at your career, who have the level of influence and sometimes fled outpower where they can dictate your next opportunity. They can say to someone,even though she's green, we're going to go ahead and let her do that roll foranother six to nine months, so she can get better at it so where people are intheir career. I talk about this in my book where people are in their career,mentors tend to happen a little bit more organically sponsors tend tohappen totally organically. In my experience, meaning it's sometimeseasier to sort of seek someone as a mentor, but in my experience chancesponsors in many cases, wind up picking you based on the kind of Minti Youvebeen. I love that differentiation right, because it's subtle, but it's importantthen, and I've and, as I think, back over my own career, my own life, I candefinitely start to see the difference between those mentors and those thesponsors, the ones that kind of took me...

...under their wing, and I wasn't evensure why they were doing it. But it was, it turned out to be extremelybeneficial relationship. Is We went through it, and so, when we look at atorganizations that are focused on me, culturand diversitis, a primary focusfor a lot of organizations. Today, I'm curious what you've seen we workingwith some of your cients. Some of the challenges are mistakes that they'remaking when it comes to approaching culture and diversity yeah. So this ismy thirtieth year, working in this space of diversity, equity andinclusion. Obviously, chaed with the wakeup call that America had thissummer. I have seen an explosion in the number of organizations and I'm talkingabout education corporations. Government, I'm talking about everysector where people are saying we have just had a wakeup call. We have got toget better here are some of the biggest quote? UNQUOTE: MISTAKES! I see peoplemaking number one, they don't link their commitment to de and I to thestrategy of the organization. Clearly, you put a group of executives in a room.You say here's where we want to be as an organization in three to five years,so you strategize that, but to not connect the diversity equityn inclusioneffort to it is a bit kind of Atlandish, becausediversity, equityn inclusion to me- are the gateway to get everybody moreengaged to get everybody to have a sense of ownership. Secondly, what Ifind is, when a lot of organizations try to start these initiatives they getto gimmicky and they get too coccused on events, rather than talking aboutreal leadership skills that people can begin to apply so that they leveragedthe diversity of their team. They are more inclusive and theyare number threeand I'll share one more after that is they don't use one of my Ajo puatitudesand it is this accountability without consequence, his only conversation.What do I mean boy that at the end of...

...the day, in an organization, if someoneexperiences a racist, Ay, sixist, an ages statement or situation, theyultimately want to know that you will number one. You will protect themnumber two. You will defend them and how do you do that? You do that bydelivering corrective consequences to anyone who would violate the values ofa coworker or a teammate or an employee, so to say that simply one of the majormistakes I see organizations make- and this is what I help my clients not do,and that is they don't have that top down cascating commitment toconsequences that are corrective for a behavior that destroys diversity,equity and inclusion. The last thing I'll tell you that I see is a reallybig mistake. If, in people's zest for Dend, I in people's desire to see thatbe a reality chat, they do so much talking about what diversity is. Whatinclusion is what equity is, but they don't do enough of showing thephenomenal talent, skill and impact of anybody who does not look like what?Maybe your normal or traditional employee looks like those would be someof the biggest things that I'm usually working to help companies organizationsovercome. Well, that's and that's a big one right, the talking about it withoutaction right, so we're going to talk about it. We're not we're not going todo anything different and some people have av seen have a tendency to thinkjust because I'm talking about it means I'm taking positive action, but no thatjust means you're fill in a room with hot air you're not doing anything, andit's more, it's less about. I mean words are important, but in theorganizations it seems to be about the actions, and I really like that th theplatitude, the accountability portion of it. I think, there's a challengesometimes for people to understand what is appropriate corrective baavioral.You know approaches to that. Some people would probably say: Okay well,depending on the like. How do you rate...

...it or how do you scale the particularsituation? It's all very sensitive, it's all very raw right now, especiallybecause of the summer that s you've mentioned and it's sensitive as itshould be. It should be approached with respect and I think it starts. You know,as you pointed out, starts with the individuals and the individuals in eachorganization is kind of where it start starts with that that value in thatculture. But there's always these little voices in the back of People'shead. So how do you help organizations overcome what you know is probably theunspoken uncertainty? That's some really good stuff because you'rehitting at what sometimes is the issue, and this is what we help our clientsfigure out. One of my very good friends. One of the people I hadmired most inthe United States- is David Ralh. She is the director of the Tennessee Bureauof Investigation, the TVI and one of his employees was taking me on a tourof what they call the infusion center and that is that sort of high tach roomwhere they tak in data from all over the world, all over the country allover the state that relates to crimes that they are investigating. Well, as Iwas taking the tour Chait, I saw a screen and had a bunch of red dots onit, and I said what what's that and they said: That's our sex traffickingboard, no notice, they didn't say that's our board, where we capturethose instances where someone might have possibly come upon a young personor a young woman and kidnapped her and now is using her for horrible illegalpurposes. Now they called it what it was. What I have found is that allthese issues, when we think about tee Andi, can be situational right, but weall know how we feel if someone commits a microaggression against us. So what I said to my Clienc is: Let'sjust turn the camera around and say now it'ssomeone else's turn. They have brought to you how they feel they have beenmicro, aggressed if you will against.

So, let's just play this out. If thisperson defrauded the customer, what would you do if this person committedsexual harassment? What would you do? My point is what I teach is: Let's justuese other values violations as our example as our guid to say how do wehandle those things again to your point? All these are going to be situational,but here's what begins to happen. Chat number one precedent start being set:that's going and number two messages start being sent hey gang. You can'tget away with that anymore, hey, it might be. Who of you not to say thatjoke again, so my point is sort of the haze of it. All, I think, can sometimesbest be handled if we just lk at similar values violations and how werespondit, and then we just tor in essence, sort of publicize, not thatindividual, but the decision so that that ripple will affect is created andpeople get a sense of what should never happen again, but I think that's, Ithink, that's an extremely intelligent way to take the unfamiliar make itfamiliar right. Well, FO, that's exactlya! We're used to. We have theseother value based decisions that we make every day. Everybody makes themand because of the emotional charge that is in some of these other areas why it doesn't have ye that different.It's still a values based erosion, so to speak, for paying and do you see-and I bring this out. This is very topical because I was just talking to aa colleague friend who is a female, an was expressing she works and I will notname company names, but she works in a construction Type Company and she wasillustrating a situation that was like over the top sexual Harassen, like justridiculous, and I'm curious if we starte having a conversation, if yousee it different at different levels of acceptance and investment, indee and Ibased on industry, are some industries...

...dragging their feet so to speak toYousee or because it has been so heightened over the last six eightmonths? Is it really just a title wave? That's just going through businesses asa whole, really great question to in my so I'm going to take thirty years andsix months and sort of put thin together right. I would tell you my thirty year careersays more often than not. Organizations that are high customer front facing arewhere you're more often than not going to see that greater longer termcommitment to Deandi right because they are dealing with customers, but thatmore back in business, where the quote unquote: General Public, never eveninterfaces with that company that is historically, maybe where I've seenless of a commitment to it. So that's generally speaking now, based on whatI've seen in two thousand and twenty I've seen an uprise in practicallyevery different sector. I mean I've been very fortunate. I tallied it upone day and when you take all the industries and sort of sub industriesthat exist in the US, I've worked in forty eight different industries withall sorts of organizations from mom and POPs to, as I said, the Federal ReserveBank, which was three hundred billion, an assets in the S. I work there allright, but the point is what I'll tell you is my view of. It is every organization that has on itswebsite negative terms away that doesn't exist.Does it nobody's website, say Yep people stink and we don't have nothingto do with them. EA We judgey at the door based on what color your skin isnobody's. No everybody's values are wonderful and violinish. Right point isthe chat. If you were willing to put VI violinish values on your website, youshould be willing to focus on diversity, equity, inclusion because Te as tatwhat they are one and the same. The...

...versity says I care about the uniqueperspective and potential of every human being in this organization,regardless of, if they're, a blue shirt where or glass Qare or salt pepperbeard, or you know the Salt Ember bearders Caso. So if you're willing tosay that we are, we value caring commitment, Resp, all these beautifulwords, it means you got to say we also value diversiy, equity and includabsolutely, and so there was a phrase when we were getting when we werepreparing going back and forth seat belt session, and I don't know whatthat is what a seat belt session is. But Iwould be curious to know: Is this something that you run your clientsthrough? Is it? Is it part of of the approach help me help me have somecontaxt with it, because it sounds amazing. I just want to make sure Iknow exactly what we're talking about. So I had it as a term, but I'll tellyou how it came up when I was a dollar general. I got four promotions in sevenyears, I feel like grant cardon my income had a TNX UTI had a tenx on my income during thattime and again, dollar general was a phenomenal work experience for me whenI got that fourth promotion, a guy who was not on my team, but a guy. I wasfamiliar with sort of appeer. He just walked into my office. He didn't have ameeting or anything and it's a whole long Tory but ultimately said to me. Hesaid Maw. What are you doing man every time I look up you geti. Anotherpromotion he's like this is crazy. I've never seen anybody get promoter likethis. What are you doing and I said Deep Bild Session Wat. I said Yeahevery quarter I' meet with my mentor, sponsor whose name SBOB and I sit in achair and I put on an imaginary seat belt. Now ask the question Bob. What do Ineed to fix and for the next thirty sixty sometimes ninety minutes, bobblast me with truth,...

...conjecture, perceptions. People have about me thatI may not be aware of sometimes splet out lives. People have told on me cat the state belt, and I said what Ido is I take it. I don't defend myself, I don't explain it a way. I just takenotes, and I creatively clarify what he say it once the thrashing is over Tak off the seat belt, and I do threethings number one. I try to do. Every Nane Bob said starting with the stuff Ihate and disagree with the most number two. As soon as I have success with what Bobtold me, I thank him profusely number three after I have thank Bob, I teachwhat I learn to other people and its cements within me. Now, if you were togo back and interview a hundred people, I work with the dollar general. All onehundred of them could say well De. Why didn't do this, or he ever was good atthat? He screwed this up, and I wull GOGL YEPyeah. If that seat belt session help me focus on these things that were mostimportant in the eyes of my sponsor, and that's was what I felt was a key tomy rapid rise of to compan well, and that is an approach that I thinkanybody can benefit from, because in order to pull those off in order tomake those actionable in order to hear the feedback and internalize it, youhave to be in a place where you believe your sponsor is coming at you withpositive intent that they're not there to tear you down they're there toincrease awareness. You also have to be strong enough and character to acceptthat some other people's perceptions, maybe their reality, but notnecessarily reality shared by many and that has to be adjust as well. That'sthose character traits, I think, serve anyone. Well, not only in business butindn in diversity and in equity and inclusion. You have to be willing tolook at what are you doing to...

...contribute to it? Whether it is yourperception or someone else's and accept that- and I think that's a huge skillset that many people could benefit from, hopefully something you get theopportunity to teach your clients yeah, it's one of the key topics in my book,because it has been a game changer for people. I've been sharing that with forover twenty years and two points, just as a carryover from what you said. Youknow one of the things I talked about with my clients as a relatie todiversity, equiny inclusion, especially in two thousand and twenty, is that themurderer of George Floy in the midst of the pandemic, with the other nationallyrecognized murders that had taken place of black citizens created in a lot ofblack people. In My opinn. This is one dude's opinion. Hey I've been dealingwith this for years, but I've never had the courage to talk about it. So all around America, black employees,black students, started to talk about not the the love they have for theorganization, but those bad experiences again. Those racist moments- thosemicroaggressions two year very point chat about having the maturity and thesecurity as a leader to hear that kind of thing is what I call e ninety fivefive rule and what that means is ninety five percent of my experience was greatloved. It here treated with respect treated as a member of the team reallyfelt like I belong, but that five percent, where somebody shut me out,where I overheard a conversation where somebody clearly said we don't want anypeople of color to be on the leadership team, where I know for a fact that someof t e, my white cohorts, were having their ideas, listened to and pumped up,but my ideas, wite being ignored, see...

...if Youre Coang to have the realmaturity of a leader to advance or transform your culture. YOUV got to bewilling to accept my five percent. In the same way, you accept my ninety fivepercent, and these are key points chat one, especially if you would nevercontribute to my five percent. One of the things I find is people who wouldgo. I would never do something racist. I would never do somethingdiscriminatory and they almost shut down in being able to accept that willyou probably wouldn't or haven't, but that person sure did right al. You gotto be able to accept my hundred percent because by telling me Wel D, Why lookat the ninety five percent come on validates me as a total person, eventhough you're only invalidating part of my experience, you're stillinvalidating me as a total person and then Lastley Char. It also says I don'tsee you for the totality of what you experience. I see you for that piece ofview, which gives me comfort, which gives me peace of mine and, once again,all those components from a seat built steppoint in terms of really hearingheart feedback will transform a person will transform a person's relationshipwith their employees and obviously, if you expand it right will expand a team,a department and maybe even a whole organization. Yeah. It's a phenomenal.It's a phenomenal exercise in understanding how to recognize- and Ilike that, wore totality the sotality of another person through theirexperiences. It doesn't mean because they're expressing they have theexperience, they're denegrating you it's just. This is the experience theyhad so to so to not give it the same weight. You would your own experiencesis that dismissive approach, which is part of the problem so getting back tothat place where you can truly be comfortable selfassessing or having asponsoror ment to R help. You self assess there's a lot of people thathave that little voice in theirhead and...

...they go squrunning screaming out thedoor because they don't want to admit that and I have to believe that's gotto be a challenge as these organizations embrace de and I they'regoing to have some ripples, for I don't know, lack butterword some some people that just don't know how to handle it. Have you seenthat in some of the organizations you've worked with, I have and I've got a session. I do call framingyour leadership legacy and I present fifteen different little for or vinetcomponents of what I think, a person who maybe is new to leadership or wantsto get better at leadership, can begin to learn from or use as a base. One ofthose little four prong component is that leadership comes down to fourthanks: Modeling Teaching, promoting and protecting, and what I found in my experience chatis that what tends to be the greatest weakness, the greatest limitation isthat forth, ine protecting that's once again that holding people accountablewell for so much of the work. I do I basically say to the leadership. I wantto help you, but let's just go ahead before we sign an agreement, if youaren't willing to model teach, promote and protect these values. I don't evenwant to take your money like that, because it's going to be a waste oftime, I'll still get paid, but your organization isn't going to changebecause we all know the speed of the leader determines the speed of thegroup. So that, for me, is the key thing is when the leadership says: I'mgoing to model what it means to demonstrate that, yes, I haveunconscious biases that have maybe negatively impacted how I do what I do.I'm going to work on that, I'm going to show you the progress. Hey I as aleader, I'm going to sit you down as my direct reports, my executive team or mymanager team, or my regional team and walking ou through one to one plans onhow you are going to now work on your...

...own biases, how you are going to bemore proactive, including in including people you haven't done so historically.So that, ultimately, is the key to any change in an organization. Is that theleaders First Modelis? The leaders are willing to teach it the leaders notjust once not just after dwise workshop, but over the next eighteen to thirtysix months, because what I say to my clients CAV is this: Is My thirty fifthyear working with large organization, my experience. It takes eighteen monthsto change a culture and another eighteen months to fully incolcatethose changes because Cha the first eighteen months, people will kind ofgoing theer Gog. You know hat they're still talking about this stuff, theyre still doing it, so it takesabout three years in one guy's experience to change whatan. So what Imean by that is, we were this in thousand and twenty. We are this in twothousand and twenty three not we'rh becoming, but the change in myexperience is eighteen, twenty four thirty six month process. So that's whyagain that model teach promote protect, has to start at the top yeah. I love it.I love it. I could go on with T I man. I could talk to you for hours on this,but out of respect it for time you got Ta start wrapping us up. We ask all ofour guess two standard questions at the end of every interview and you as a sawt after public speaker, author. You know change agent for this stuff, youthat means you're, also a prospect. No doubt you're getting prospected toother people. Think they've got something they want to do business withyou. I'm always curious. If somebody doesn't have a trusted referral intoyou, like somebody, you trust brings them in the door if they don't havethat. How does somebody capture your attention and earn the right to time onyour calendar? What works best for you? So that's a really really reallyimportant question. I just was talking with my wife yesterday who started ourconsulting practice...

...eighteen years ago now my wife is inChaplin, so she still works in the organization, but she's primarilyfocused on her duties as a Camplin, but we were saying we are giving peoplenaturally, so the more giving someone is, the less techniquely you have to be, and also the more giving someone is andthe more they have the time to give, because the other Barr variable mightbe. You Ha Youre, very givvy, but your time is really short. So the threethings that stand ut to me when I think about this question our number one:Does the person personalize what they are sharing through their observationof you through their study of you, the research of you or am I just gettingthe standard? I would like to meet you other human being. I wonder if we canbuild a Fridgeomoa right, so is it? Is it personalized or is it sort ofrobotic secanly? To what degree is it short and sweet? There's nothing when Isay worst they're, clear things worse, but it's a phrase we obviously use, butthere's nothing worse and someone with the sixteen paragraph introductionabout who they are and where they came from and they went to school withAbraham Lincolns like look man, okay, great president, Yeah Right, okay, getto the point. So how can you say what you want to say to a person? You'venever met, and then I think the third example or third point Chad for me ishow do you tie into something that has a collective or share significanceagain, based on what you know, based on what you presume about that personversus just it being a one way thing either one way for you or one way forthem, and just one little cabby ad three, as never used I'd like to pickyour brain just go ahead and delete that fomr vernacular, because that justsounds gross and it just speaks. I think it's a phrase that we've used fora long time in America at least, but it just almost says, Iwant to getsomething from you and I just wouldn't...

...recommend using it. I love it, that'sextremely practical advice and so all right last question: We call it ouracceleration insight. If there was one piece of advice you could give toorganization professional sales marketing, whatever one piece of advice,just one that if they listened, you believe, would help them achieve orexceed their targets. What would it be and why it would be to its three parts, go to Derek store thatdireck young speakscom purchase, make my higdsight your two thousand andtwenty and take the action pland template at the back of each chapter asserious as you did, your Undergrad or your Grad degree in that book? What Ido is, I say what happens to people Chare, they read books, they go toseminar to go to the PODCAST, but here's what they don't do, and this isgoing to sound almost too simplistic when you get a nugget, you go. I likethat. I need that two things schedule the day and time an event where you'regoing to apply it. I've helped over probably five hundred people getpromotion. Since I've been doing this kind of work for thirty years. It is agame. Change. Nice love, it do you I. Where do you want? So obviously thewebsite is there any place else? You want us to send them some way. Youwould like people who want more information want to get in touch withyou. What's where do you want us to send them? We want to make sure you getsome bang for the buck on es appreciate that the beast place to go is right tothe website, because that's where You'e going to see my story, I tell my storychair by talking about a concept, give people their flowers before they die,and in sharing that in my website it's on the about dy tap people will seejust some of the people that I am thinking for having a positive impacton my life. But I think when you get to kind of see a person's background andhow they feel about their background, it clues you into the real calling thatthey have so derec Koung Speakscom Chad...

...would be the best place for people togo to find out more, but to get the book just as a short cut, store dot,tereic young speakscom excellent. Do I can't thank you enough for taking thetime to be on the shop again? I'm sorry we had to reschedule but really trulyappreciate, sticking with it. I've really enjoyed this conversation wantto. Thank you for your time. Thank you, and I will tell you this: a lot ofpeople are podcasting. A lot of people are sharing, but your level ofquestioning the the depth, the the specificity, the quality of yourquestions chat, are opportane man. I appreciate that. I appreciate that alot all right, all right, everybody that does it for this episode. You knowthe drill be to be revizeccom, nobody's going out anywhere so share with yourfriends. Family Coworkers Hell make your kids listen to. It. Leave USreview on itunes until next time we avalue selling associates Wich Shawal,nothing, but the greatest success you've been listening to the BTVrevenue executive experience to ensure that you never miss an episodesubscribe to the show in Itunes or your favorite podcast player. Thank you somuch for listening until next time.

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