The B2B Revenue Executive Experience
The B2B Revenue Executive Experience

Episode · 4 years ago

Chuck Frydenborg and Mariana Just on Account Based Sales & Marketing: Often Discussed, Rarely Understood

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Often discussed but rarely understood, account based sales and marketing are the new buzzwords of industry. How has this new approach changed B2B sales?

To find out, we invited Chuck Frydenborg and Mariana Just to come on the B2B Revenue Executive Experience podcast. Chuck serves as Vice President, Global Sales and Mariana as Director of Revenue Marketing & Operations at Acrolinx, an AI platform that uses linguistic analytics to improve corporate content.

According to Mariana and Chuck, marketing and sales exist within an intellectually diverse landscape in which buyers are ⅔ to ¾ of the way through the decision-making process about a product or service before contacting the company's sales team.

Both Chuck and Mariana bring deep experience in their respective fields, and we had a chance to ask them about team building, alignment, and building relationships for success in account based sales and marketing.

Being consultative means being an expert, not about your company, because they can get that information from a host of different places. You need to be an expert about their business. You're listening to the BDB revenue executive experience, a podcast dedicated to helping executives train their sales and marketing teams to optimize growth. Whether you're looking for techniques and strategies or tools and resources, you've come to the right place. Let's accelerate your growth in three, two, one. Welcome every one of the B Tob Revenue Executive Experience. I'm your host, Chad Sanderson. Today we're going to tackle and often talked about but in my experience, little understood, topic that's a countbase sales and marketing. To help us, we have not one but two guests from acur links, Charles Chuck Fritenborg, Vice President Global Sales, and Marianajus, director of marketing and operations. Thank you both for taking the time to be on the show today. To be he delighted excellent. So let's start with a little bit of background and because you know, when we were growing up, I don't know about you, chuck, but I wasn't playing with my fire engines a gijoe going wow, I can't wait to grow up and be a sales professionals. So I would just saw. I was like to ask our guests how did you get into sales? Well, the shorter answer that I can give you is that when I graduated from college I didn't know what I wanted to do when I grew up. So, in lieu of having that exact career path figured out, I was living in Stanford Connecticut at the time and one of the fastest growing companies in the area was a company called Gartner Group. It was a lot of buzz around it. They were growing fast, there were a lot of different jobs available and I just signed on to work there while I figured out what I was going to do, and was very sports oriented individual at the time, ended up joining the company baseball team and most of the individuals on that team were from sales and they weren't smarter than me. They they look kind of like I did, but man, they drove much nicer cars and lived in a isn't that the truth? Isn't that? So through those relationships I had an opportunity to speak with a gentleman by the name of richeld, who led North American sales for Gartner at the time and he is now, you know, cofounder at serious decisions and I asked him how I could join the Gartner sales force and he didn't laugh at me too hard but as very nicely as he could, made sure that I understood that that was not an entry level sales job that they typically had. People joined Gartner after, in a five to ten years of proven success at companies at the time like Zero Bucks and IBM. But he was still very helpful. I then asked him, well, if I want to sell a gartner does that mean I have to leave, be successful someplace else and then come back? And he said no, that's not necessarily true. But what you would need to do is go over to the research side of our business, spend a couple years there, Imil your eye yourself with what we do, the key issues that we saw for our clients, and become comfortable and articulate and discussing those and then you would need to move over to a client service role and demonstrate your capability and a client facing role. And if you do those things well, then we can talk. And that's what I did and I came back and approached Rish four years later, when they had a territory and more than New Jersey that they couldn't fill, and I think their choice was me or an empty territory. After much consideration, they chose me. I had a lot of success and it came pretty fast. So that's kind of how that worked. Accidentally. Have rich is a great guy. We do we do a lot of work with serious decisions. So it's it's interesting how small some of this universe is that we all live in. Absolutely John or close friends...

...of mine to this day and people that have had a strong influence on Mike were excellent. And how about you, Mary? I looks like from when I was doing our research, looks like you went to northwestern and focused on business and marketing much earlier than I did as I went through my career. Curious what keeps you passionate about marketing? Yeah, definitely so. I I knew very early on that IED to go to business school. In fact, I grew up in Brazil knowing that I wanted to come to the United States and I wanted to come to college at the US and there's something to be said about the time when I started my professional career and it was probably the technology and the marketing technology I call it. I was very much in the middle of the marketing technology storm when when I started, and it was pretty exciting. My first internship I was with a company where we you sell sporce. This is about two thousand and three and I think sales force had only been around for maybe four years or Catto. Hob Spot then came soon after and and we kind of all grow up together. And just a spread of the Internet allowing that instant seen your audience engage with your campaign's very different world from just the earlier mid s and and Google beate advertising. So all of that stuff really made me continue to remain excited about marketing and I knew that that being such a technology young people like myself, I kind of wanted to continue on that bath and I embraced it. You have to have to embrace the technology free marketing today well, and I'm going to say I'm jealous for that clarity of thought that you had at that is because I will be one of those guys that tells you I ended up in sales by accident. So to have that clarity makes me jealous. I'll just be honest. So thank you very much for that. And so let's talk a little bit about actter links. Check you when they give just a little high level on act links in some context for the audience. I'd be delighted to. So what actrol links does is ensure that all of the content that a company creates is aligned with their content goals. Specifically, what I'm referring to is tone of voice, style, terminology, and that content is also written in a way that is well targeted to the personas that they're trying to engage. We do that by working with the company to understand those content goals and then, in essence, having a team of computational linguistics, linguistic experts, for lack of a better term, program those goals into our platform and then, as they have content creators throughout the world writing content, that content is filtered through our platform against those goals and then we can make instantaneous recommendations to those content creators to the changes that they need to make to again ensure the alignment between that piece of content and the content goals of the company. I mean that's a pretty powerful too when you think about it. Right. So everybody out there. Anybody's paying attention. Understand you have to create content, that has to be a strategy behind it, but the ability to analyze it on the fly, to apply that AI type of approach, is phenomenal to me. Now, I was a English major as an Undergrad. So for me specifically, I find it extremely intriguing the link wristic nature of it. And there is on your website there's an excellent graphic. It's kind of the graphics you would expect to see on a website, but those of us that are in the business, it shows it's about. I want to say I don't know, two thirds of the way down if you scroll guys, so audience, get attention. Go to the website, hit it and it talks about stats for success. But there's one element that really caught my attention and it was specifically greater brand of trust. So, Marianna, I'd love to capture your perspective on how you know an aipowered tool like accrolings provides can actually evolve content to create a particularly human reaction, which is the increased amount of trust. So I...

...have to ask if you finally cracked the code that allows us to really formulaically develop trust with people through great content. Well, if you think about all some of the things that sort of help with brand trust, authenticity comes to mind. Consistency comes to mind, the credibility, and it too chats point a little earlier, explaining about though the product. What is more authentic than being able to speak with one voice and to speak to your audience with the clarity, with alignment? Right, you can do that with atolings. You can in fact get thousands of writers across to bold to write with one voice, especially nowadays, where you said content is so important, but nowadays everyone in the organization is of minder. You've got your writing help be well, AH, you have the agencies writing for you. How do you ensure that they represent your brand and how can you have branch rust if all of your writers are all of a sudden potion different content? I mean you probability you might get sued and and so those are the kind of things that the grand related challenge is that a provinces is helping to solve. It's a phenomenal challenge that as a linguist, self professed linguist, I don't know if those that hang out with me on the weekends would agree with that, but I would say the one that loves language and that sees that the ability to get that phrase you use a thousand writers writing with one voice. That is something that in my marketing career, before I switched in the sales, we struggled with. So to know that there's a potential solution out there is is excellent. So I really appreciate that. So let's jump to topic in hand, account based marketing in sales, ABM and ABS. For those that are in the game, there are hot topics. Everybody's talking about it. So Chuck. From your perspective as a sales professional, have you seen these two approaches change the game? Yeah, and I think it. The creation of ABM and ABS is due to the dramatic change in the demands and expectation of a professional be tob sales person. If you look back, you know, let's say fifteen, twenty years ago, I can even say when I started in sales, the reason that or the means by which you delivered value to your potential buy or to your prospect and the presal process was by being the expert about your company. All right, because they had no other means to learn about what your company did, what business issue it solved? How you packaged in priced your offerings. Perhaps you know who were references or case studies that would give them a level of comfort regarding the the investment they were considering making. So they had to call the company and say, Hey, you know, I live in New York. Who is the salesperson? Call my region and so the the job of the salesperson then was to be the expert regarding the company. Buyers don't need salespeople for that anymore. What would I challenge my salespeople with? Is it we have to be consultative. In yes, that's a very high level term. What does it mean? Being consultative means being an expert. Not About your company, because they can get that information from a host of different places. You need to be an expert about their business, about the business issue that they are trying to solve, which would lead them to want to interact with you in the first place. And you need to be an expert about their business environment, their vertical the competitive pressures they might be under, the market dynamics that might be stressing their businesses that your company is well positioned to solve. Typically, now, potential buyers of a...

...service or product don't contact the provider of that product or service until two thirds, three quarters of the way through their decisionmaking process. So if you're going to be successful in sales and you're going to be successful as a sales organization, you have to do two things. You have to target your proactive sales and marketing efforts in a very disciplined, strategic and, finally, targeted way and when you engage those potential buyers, you have to be able to demonstrate value through your expertise about their environment. It's definitely a more, I would say, intellectually diverse landscape that I see when I was running teams and stuff, and so I'm going to apologize Mary. I'm going to jump questions and come back to one. I know had kind of scripted this out, but it leads me to the question of teams. So when you talk about an account based sales, a true account based sales approach, this podcast came about because chuck and I have some connections and the gentleman that we both know told me that chuck was a master at hiring and leading sales teams, and so I'm curious is knowing that your team's coming in and they obviously are going to be working in an ABS SYB am approach. Does that change the profile of the salesperson you're looking for today, or maybe even the way that you coach them once they're higher? It doesn't change the profile of the individual that I hire because the need for ABM and what we're trying to achieve through an account base marketing, account base sales strategy is born of the same characteristics that we just discussed that I'm really looking for in a salesperson. What we require here is not somebody who will run around just trying to grab lowhanging fruit based upon inbound right. We're a small company. We're growing very quickly. When you look at the scale of this sales team, compared to my past at Gartner or Rosetta stone, we're rather small. So when your resource constrained, you must be very disciplined around who you proactively target to try to sell. So one of the things I did when we first came on board is we established an ideal client profile to an essence, stop that lowhanging fruit picking. We wanted to really understand who our buyers were and it wasn't very complex. It was company seven hundred and fifty million and above in text software, semiconductor, financial services, manufacturing and engineering, medical devices and Pharma and aerospace into test. The reason that we felt a need to do that is that we did not have the luxury of wasting sales cycles, getting in advanced discussions and then have the company inevitably ask what other companies do you work with that look and feel exactly like us and and where you solve their problem, and have us look at them and go I well, nobody, because we have your vertical. Before we felt we needed to be very disciplined around not only sticking with verticals and companies where we had a good story to tell, where we could be consultative because we had a proven track record of fixing the problem that they were trying to solve in a company that looked almost exactly like them, and we needed to get disciplined, as not just a sales organization but a marketing organization, about focusing our resources on those targets that would most likely lead to a sale for us. Excellent, and so all right. So we've talked about team, we've talked about this, you know, targeting specific profiles. I'm a huge fan of ideal customer profiles. It does keep your sales people focused instead of, you said it nicer, picking up, you know,...

...low hanging fruit. But there's other ways. I've heard that said before, but really really appreciate that connotation to it. So now let's talk about those target accounts. So, Mariana, when you get a list of target accounts or you go to create a list of accounts that meet those profile miles, how do you go to about creating a plan for the marketing towards US account something that's in alignment with sales? In my experience has been much more than just sending hey few emails and let the sales people know what's going on. It's much more strategic, it's much more intellectual and I know our audience to be extremely grateful for a high level overview of effective approaches that you've seen in terms of the planning and creation of those target account lists. Yeah, totally, and the word discipline has been used here a few times already and I'll say it again. It requires a lot of discipline, and I will even back up a little to before selecting those started accounts. Before anything, what I did here was understand the reasons why we were even getting into radim the first place and assessing if it makes sense for our business, just by simply asking questions like are they are my multiple buyapor sounas involved, the deal sides and length of your sales cycle, so that this allows for everyone to get on board, because you will need to get everyone bought into this. ABM is hard and I know that marketers are everywhere. Have the ABM buzz very, very hard and it takes a lot of discipline, time and getting everyone on board with this. So don't do it just because everyone is doing it. To get back to your original question, I structured our IBM plan here at a curls into four different stages, so the accounts election being the first, and, in relation to your question, the account selection process is really where you're making decisions around how many accounts for wrap who target. If we selects, say, five accounts for rep the strategy changes a bit versus thirty four you because then you're getting away from that one to want approach to us something that's a little bit more at scale and that's completely going to change how we go to market. Of course, as truck mentioned, you talked about ideal customer profile. We want to make sure that those accounts are with an ourcpiece. You want to bring your sales reps into the conversation. Do not plan your accounts in Assyloh, sales reps don't want that. You make sure that they are body into this because at the end of the day, they are the ones going to be doing the follow up. So you want to make sure that they're following me up with the accounts that they also will believe in. So that's the first stage. So fine, I've got that under control. That second phase is the account planning process. So this is where I am looking at. Okay, these are the accounts, how many contacts for company do I already have in my database? What contact apposition Dow need to do and what are the tools that I'm going to use in order to do some of that acquisition? Right, we had an intron who helped us and we did a lot of breaking on Linkedin and the different intelligence tools to acquire some of those contacts. Then then, of course, you want to make sure that you're tarting the right titles, pursuing theos. So all of that comes into the the second phase, which I called they account planning stage. The third stage is the tear engagement plan, and how are you actually going to market? We did a combination of physical and digital hereach. We made sure that we had a theme around our campaign, which was based off of any book that had already been performing really well in market. You kind of do want to take something that is already performing well, especially if this is a proof of concepts like you lost for us. He wants you also project manage this really, really well, whether you're doing in charts or whatever it is that you do to keep yourself or project management will, because there is a lot involved in and bringing all of this things together and kind of...

...off you go, right and by the way, the entire planning to execution to launch for us took about ninety days when we first started to do this, so it's sort of important to understand how much time it actually takes. We are small team, so it took us, you know, about three months. Well, I mean that's too honestly, that's still not bad. Well, we worked quickly, and so that's all of your main stages. The very last one might be the most important one, and that's the measurement plan you want. You do want to know what you're going to be measuring before you go to market and before you launch your campaign. I feel like we're going to talk a little bit about aps later, so I'm going to not give too much away right now. But the fourth and final measurement when? What? What are your KPS? So, in a nutshell, those are the things that this is how we structure here at our grow links and it's a process that worked really well for us, excellent. And so we've all mentioned discipline, discipline, discipline. I'm a big fan of that. I believe sales, especially today, is a discipline. Marketing is a discipline. I have a lot of people that used to before I started doing what I'm doing today, they used to report to me that used to roll their eyes at that word. Right. So it's in the same vein, as you know, patients and focus. And with the digital onslaught that we are all living in today, attention spands seem to get shorter. So I'm curious, Mariana, what you found to be the largest hurdles internally when it comes to executing that discipline in that strategy around ABM. Getting everyone aligned was definitely a big hurdle. So, for example, and I'm not just talking about sales and marking alignement here. That's a given. You absolutely need to have that in order to make ABM successful, but even other teams within the marketing department. How do you get product marketing or content teams to prioritize this when their goals aren't directly associated with ABM results, for example? So they had their owntorial calendar that they needed to follow and here I am asking for new content and for ADM campaign. That was definitely a learning process and kind of had to take a step back and really align ourselves on the goal because, again, I mentioned earlier, if you're going to do ABM, it should definitely be a company wide strategy and people to be bought into. The second thing that I will say is, especially now that we're looking to scale operationally, we're not set up to be able to scale ABM yet, though. I'm not even quite sure we want to be able to scale ABM. I don't know if it's the right a boat for us, but that's definitely a hurdle that I'll be tackling. You know this coming border, because the proof of concept that we did earlier this year did really well for us. So we're kind of taking that and scally so operation movie. I think we're going to have some hurdles that we're going to need to address. Okay, excellent. So let's talk about engagement for a second. I have I have clients that I've work with or your people that will tell me, Oh, if somebody likes a piece of content, they're engaged. And I don't know about you guys, to me that's just it's a golf clap, it's a lot of sound and very signifying nothing. So I'm curious when, when you guys, you know, start to do ABM, and I'll put this to both of you really, what have you have found to be the most successful in terms of actually getting into deeper levels of engagement with your customers through those ABM techniques and approaches? I can be so good. I mean we, I talked about out doing digital and and physical, but we learned that, you know, getting back to basics, getting a direct mail piece out just to get someone's attention actually worked and we had a great little motif. So the e book that I was mentioning earlier that had performed well. It was about...

...it was the mind ingredients to better content. So we took that whole theme of food and ingredients and we actually turned the box into a cake and from the outside it looks like a chocolate cake and on top of side a cheat deliciousness with your content and hide. There was a Mug, because you do want to send something that is branded somehow if you know your low or your brands. So we sent a neck really smug, very nice mug and we also send a nut cake. I don't know if you know this, but my cakes are all the rage right now. Yeah, so we had this whole theme around it and they got people to pay attention and we also personalized it. We had a personal note that came from the Vidr some we did some research about some of those people, you know if they had information about themselves on twitter, so about, you know, sports teams or things like that. It took a very much of a want to want approach to be able to do this in a way that people would pay attention, because if I think of ways that people are going to get my attention, that's how they're going to do it. So as a marketer, I was able to take that approach in thinking about how we wanted to to tackle this so for Imam that was one key aspect of that. Obviously, for different stages of the phone there's different things that you do for getting people's attention. But for that middle of the phone and more ABM direct mail has worked well. For personalization is key, right having people want to feel important, they want to feel like you're recognizing them. They don't respond as well anymore to the standard. Hey, here's a marketing automated email and we know it's marketing automated because you spelled my name wrong and it was just, you know, it was of something that dumped into a field. So that personalization is key. So really like that approach to it. Then I'm a big fan of it. If you haven't seen a picture, man a big fan of cake anyway. But so let's talk about let's talk about success. How do we measure success? And Chuck, I want to start with you. In your sales teams. Have you found a need to create a different type of complant or set of different metrics for success for these teams, beyond just simple quota attainment, or is it really just a new approach on top of a very standard type of incentive plan? My short answer is no, and I'll explain why I'm when it comes to a building a Complan, I'm a big believer in simplicity. I think you need to do three things. You need to create a complan that has a high degree of clarity and no ambiguity. You need to design a comp plan to attract the behaviors that you want. For example, if you're at a stage with a company where they've got an annual revenue growth pattern that looks like a hockey stick, you know, maybe you want to put in quarterly accelerators for quarterly standalone achievement, for example. You know, I think you've got to take a good hard look at what you need for the business out of the sales organization and then structure your comp plan accordingly. And the reason I am an advocate of simplicity and I'm from the New York area originally, and you know, there's a quote from build parselves Chad, that I have carried with me given what I chose to do for a living, which is you are what your record says you are. You know, build parcelves didn't have a lot of patients for somebody on their team saying where the best three and six team in the league. You know, all that mattered is your three and six right. So I think you've got a structure complants around performance and that has to be the most important measure for a salesperson. I am not, and I want to make sure this is understood, I am not saying that there aren't activities, behaviors, just simply the way of going about your business every day. Establishing Secondary KPIS. I'm not saying...

...those aren't important, but I've always been a believer in that being something that is managed to and coach to and mentor two, as opposed to something that's strengthing to come. Excellent, excellent, all right. So how about on the marketing side? Where how do you how do you recommend people set up Kpis to track the effectiveness of their their Abim campaigns? I feel really strongly about this and the way that we did it here is restructured our measurement in three phases and, especially because we were doing a proof of concept, we kind of where I had some hypothesis around what it would take for us to be able to continue with a PM. So within a few weeks of launch you should probably have early indicator KPIS. That tracking and I'll talk about that in a second because it is it is important. So three weeks early indicators, thirty two, ninety days. I am starting to look at overall engagement increased from a content consumption perspective, downloads and website visits, email opens, all of those kinds of things, and then that six to twelve months time frame. At this for us we have a really long sales cycle. I'm looking at overall on a velocity, deal closed and even sort of increase steal size. We were not there yet. Obviously ABM is new to us, but I wanted to go back to those early indicators because this is kind of what was going to make or break US continuing to do this or which direction that we would take. I wanted to prove out when we developed our ABM plans that, based on industry standards, Ab Im should help you increase velocity right and it should help you puss cut some of your costs in half. So basically, if looking from an inbound approach, it typically takes an inbound mqul twenty eight days to become a meaning. So my hypotheses was, well, with ABM it should really take fourteen dates and I want my meetings and my cost of my meetings to be cut in half and we were able to do that. We were able to show as part of those early indicators, like I said, fourteen days from when someone received a campaign or indirect mail to when we were able to book up meeting with them. That took about fourteen days. That was really, really important for me to be able to go back to the management team and say this is working, this is exactly what I wanted this to do. So understand what Papas are important to you. One of my most important ones again, our epistimating conversion. So I wanted to be able to understand how we BM would impact that will right away. Excellent. Those are amazing, amazing insights for the audience. So thank you very much for sharing the congratulations for hitting those. It's it's impressive. So let's let's talk a little bit about team makeup in terms of structuring a sales or market team inside of an Abim may be asked. Kind of structure is the does the team structure look any different than what most people would consider a normal sales team? Chuck, have you done different things to structure that team to make sure they work seamlessly with marketing, play well with others. All, you know all of the standard objections that we hear about sales of market and get along. Have you had to adjust the way that the team has been structured or found something that works better? Well, first I'll tell you I have lived in an environment where sales and marketing were somewhat adversarial, so I know what that's like. Thankfully that's not the situation here. Mari and and our entire market marketing organizations, led by Chris Wallace or have been outstanding partners for us, and the reason they have been is because we're collaborating all the time. We're passing along feedback, we're discussing not only successes so we can repeat them, but mistakes so we can avoid them. They've been outstanding. Regarding the Organization of my team, I think you use the word...

...unusual. I think perhaps I don't view the way we're structure or the direction we're going in as unusual, except when I look perhaps at the size of our sales organization. You know, we don't have a huge team. I mean globally we have now eleven field reps and five business development reps, but in our quest to not only make our a then efforts spective, but also, and I'll go back to what we discussed earlier in this call, relative to the need for sales people to be consultative, we are transitioning as rapidly as it logistically makes sense to move from the geographic territory organization that I inherited to a vertically oriented territory one, and that's simply become mean, and that's not a criticism to what I walk into here. When you have, you know, three reps in the United States and three in Europe, you really can't be aligned vertically. It doesn't really work. We we had east, central, west. Go get them guys, but now that we've scaled the team, we know that the path towards our accelerating our growth is to ensure that we're putting our sales people in the position where they can be consultative about company, about industry, and the only way to do that is to enable them to have that focus. So we have one tech specific territory. I now have a what we call enterprise account director that we've moved from a geographic specialization to being a financial services subject matter overlay and we're going to continue to seize those opportunities. So, you know, if I have somebody that's in a Geo close a couple of arm and deals, because a lot of the farmer companies are in are in the Northeast and New Jersey, then will gather those farm accounts around that Rep and enable them to be consultative. Excellent. All right, so let's these kind of questions. Next question is always give our audience insights to make sure that they understand their world's not much different than the people that we talked to. And so, as a sales executive, you mentioned the word business issue earlier in the interview and I don't know if that's because it's part of the framework that you've been exposed to. It's a word, it's a phrase I'm very familiar with, and so when we look at you as the head of sales, what's the top business issue you're focused on today? What is it? What's the KPI year being measured with a really focused on to ensuring the team helps you achieve Chad, this is going to be a shocker. Revenue Growth? No, why? I've never heard that before and I'm saying that it's serious and its tongue and cheek at the same time. We have doubled the size of our company in the last two and a half years, but we see an addressable market that offers us an opportunity to significantly accelerate that growth and to do so in the short term, right. So my focus is enabling us to hit those short term revenue targets while also building out and organization that is going to be able to scale a longer term and in doing so, that place acrol links in a position where scaling a bunch and then we have to do a reset and Reorg and then scale again. Right. We're very focused on making sure that what we do, how we align our sales reps, how we build territories that are we're doing so in a way where, as we continue to expand, the structure...

...is one that will be able to sustain. Excellent. Excellent. And Marianne, how about you? So top line revenue growth is the overall business objective. How are you measured? You know what are your Kpis to make sure we're contributing towards that that objective. Well, one of the things that I'm ball is always focused on is accelerating the funnel. So what are the things that are helping with that. It's you know, my conversions, my kepis. I didn't correctally earlier, but my title actually contains the Work Revenu. It's direct to our revenue marking. Did I screw that up? It's okay, I'm so sorry. I'm so sorry. I will fix that in post. I. It's about accelerating the funnel, right. So some of the goals for me for the remainder of the will be to continue to tackle that and ABM is one way that we found to be able to accelerate the funnel and to be able to create this sort of more predictable report on how marketing's actually help me with revenue growth. And you mentioned a little bit earlier that you know the the listeners like to hear that people have sort of the same challenges. Trust me, we all do, particularly with enterprise level sales. The the funnel is long, the funnels comber sound and you also become meetings. Meetings on become opportunities, things that stock and then, for me it becomes much more than just optimizing campaigns. Right. It's implementing or how we enable our bed ours, for example, to be productive. Help motivate them and check and I work really closely with that because obviously and Q wels are being sent over to to our bedrs and it is my responsibility to to make sure that they are productive, the the drs are productive, that they are motivated as well and to help them and to overcome those challenges. Those are all kinds of things that have been very much shop of mind for me. So it's all of the above, excellent. All right. So let's Change Direction here a little bit. We ask all of our guests kind of two standard questions towards the end of each interview. The first is simply as revenue executives, and I will I will fix that, Marian. I apologize that. Should make sure that word is in your title. You. That makes you guys, to put it bluntly, prospects for other people that are out there trying to sell things. So I was like to ask our guests if somebody's trying to get in front of you that you don't have a relationship with, there's not a referral, but it's somebody who's really trying to capture attention and build credibility. What works best to capture that attention and get that first conversation with you and set it up for to see if there's actually a solution that they might have for you. And so, Marianna, let's start with you. What captures your attention and builds that credibility? Yeah, I think we talked about personalization earlier and shock said demonstrate value through your expertise. Right, I want you to know me, to be relevant to me and understand my beins and and speak that language. Right, I am not a good example because I feel like I am a salesperson's drink come through. I'm pretty active. I have a blog where I write about demand generation. So I those guys have it easy because you can very easily find what things are of concern to me. So researched at you're going to find stuff visible actually got my attention. They did a really good job. Recently, they send me a small ABM package. She had just some candy in it and but the note was really personalized and this guy knew me and he knew all about my blog and he understood that. You know, I wanted to understand or to do attribution. So those are the things that are important to me and that we catch my attention. In this world of emails all the time and thousands...

...of emails. How many I'm running, as you have Hump Right now on read and we're probably into at least three digits. Won't get one four right now. Yeah, so we're still in the three digits. I I spend most of my nights. I this is probably more information you guys want to know about me, but I'm a share as you'll learn. I've spend most of my day at happy hour going through the emails and forgot what I'm actually going to read and what I'm not. And it's amazing the longer that I say at the Bar, I respond to more that I get to later in that list. I'm not sure why that happens. I just maybe it's because I've relaxed at the bar for some reason. Not sure, but chuck, let's ask you the same question. What captures your attention and helps build that credibility so you actually give somebody some of your very valuable time? Will chat first. I'll admit that I love the question because I have gotten to the point where if my iphone lights up on a call and it's a number as opposed to a name, I don't answer yeah, which really means I have a lot of and I guess on the Anti Mari there, because she's she's like friendly, and here I am leading the sales organization and I'm like no, but you know, it's just at a necessity. So I have a lot of empathy for the tasks that we've charged our beat ours with and what I look forward to. Answer your question is the same thing that I kept in mind. You know, twenty plus years ago, when I was banging the phone's at Gartner trying to get appointments, I always took the view that if that person answered the phone and listen to the voicemail, I had five seconds to give them a reason to keep listening. Exactly. I can, actually I was thinking about this. I can, while Mari was talking, I can use an example. I listened to a voicemail got now, it has to be over a year ago, fifteen months ago, and I have kept in touch with this sales person and the voicemail read hi, this Michelle Bach from sixter. If you are concerned about how to expand the reach of your sales team, please call me. Perfect. That's that is a perfectly crafted voice mail. Yeah, and and I was and I was sitting in an airport waiting for a delayed flight. Listen to the message, went to deleted and went way. Chuck, that is something that's creaking you out. My Watch and was like I have time, Oh what the hell, and I called her and she answered the phone and three months later we had sixter on all of our email signatures company. Why? So? If you get to know me, and I'll define get to know me as say something to me that's relevant that can help me do my job, then I'll call you back. If get to know me is you've looked at my linkedin profile for thirty seconds and you've referred to it like two things to make it seem like you've done research, I don't care. Right, right, personalization is key. Everybody needs to understand that out there. All right. So last question. We'll call it our acceleration insight. There's one thing you could tell sales, marketing, professional services. People want piece of advice that if they listened, that is always the COBAT. If they listened, you believe, would help them hit their targets. What would it be? M Why? Let's start with each other this time. Have the courage to engage in honest introspection heavy one. Well, but you know, what we do is really difficult. But the people that are successful in sales or whatever discipline that they pursue, they are successful because they have identified the activities that make them successful and they've gotten disciplined around that and at the same time they've identified the activities that potentially aren't the best use of their time or maybe the activities that they really like to do but don't really get them closer to their bowls, and they've...

...gotten equally disciplined around eliminating them. I've told people that have reported to me many times, if you're spending time trying to justify what you're doing to me, you're missing the boat right. You need to be able to justify what you're doing and how you're doing it to your self. So yeah, I would say of all qualities or things that people can do, having that gift of introspection so they can be honest with themselves, understand their strength, understand their weaknesses and continue to improve, that's the most important that. I agree one hundred percent. I think sales reps is particular, have too much tendency to look outward rather than inward. You don't change other people, you can only change yourself. So thank you for that. That is beautifully put. How about you mark one thing that you think if somebody listened to it would help them crush their numbers or be more successful? Well, it's fine that chap got off philosophical with that answer. On the same paths I got called on. First I typically what I say is a line and and relate. I think it's very easy for sales and marketing to sort of get into their own individual worlds to not really see the big picture. I like to say leave your eagles at the door, because then you're not doing what's best for the company and in relations to even be am. I think maybe M forces you to do that and to be that way. So obviously I there's no successfully be am without that kind of alignment. So I would say first and foremost, try to see, relate, really is really important, alignment and be empathetic. I love it. I love it perfect. If a listeners interested in talking more about betting, the topics we touched on, learning more about acro links. Where should they go first? Where would you guys direct them to my team? If you would like to, I'll make this really easy. If you would like to learn more about us, my email is Charles Friedenborg at acrol Linkscom. Please reach out. Excellent. Well, I cannot thank you both enough for being on the show today. This has been a great conversation. Truly have enjoyed the opportunity to speak with both of you. Thank you. Yeah, we've enjoyed it as well. Thank you. Chat all right, everyone that does it for this episode. Please check us out at be to be REV exaccom. You know the drill. Share the episode of Friends, families, CO workers, random people you meet on the street. If you like what you here do his favorite wite as review on itunes. And until next time, we have value prime solutions with you all nothing but the greatest success. Are you concerned about hitting your revenue targets this month, quarter or year? Your answer is value prime solutions a sales, training and marketing optimization company leveraging the value selling framework. visit www dot value prime solutionscom and start accelerating your results. You've been listening to the BB revenue executive experience. To ensure that you never miss an episode, subscribe to the show and Itunes for your favorite podcast player. Thank you so much for listening. Until next time,.

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