The B2B Revenue Executive Experience
The B2B Revenue Executive Experience

Episode · 3 years ago

Chloe Thomas on eCommerce and Online Trends

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In a new era of B2B buyers shifting towards eCommerce and online buying trends, we ask the question, “How can sales professionals and retailers be competitive?”

To answer this question and help us understand the B2B shift to eCommerce, we sat down with Chloe Thomas, founder of eCommerce MasterPlan.

Youre, listening to the BTB revenueexecutive experience, a podcast dedicated ELP, an executives train,their sales and marketing teams to optimize growth, whether you're lookingfor techniques and strategies were tools and resources. You've come to theright place. Let's accelerate your growth in three to one: Welcome eey oneto the be to be revenue, executive experience, O'm your host ChadSanderson today we're talking about e commerce and online buying trends andhow they're impacting the sales, professional and people in general.It's a big shift, especially for retailers, have to combat onlinecommerce and help us do this. We have with is chloe Thomas Author, speaker,founder of e commerce, Master Plan cloke. Thank you for taking time to beon the show today, Hi Tad. I it's excellent to be here and I'm reallylooking for taling a chat with you. So as we were preparing for the show today,you mentioned how the new breed of betbe buyers want to be able to buyonline, which maybe a shift for some people right, BDC everybody's used tothat right, but it be o, be that inclination. I think you AK, you calledit. The millennial effect- and you know I can see how this makessense again: Ind Transactional sales even in be tob space, but help how USunderstand how this is affecting large or more complex buyers and sellers yeah. It's it's an interesting one,because you say you know in the consumer world we used to buying online.Well, that's exactly what's causing this effect in businesses. You know youthink about the new graduate or the graduate kind of seven eight years intotheir into their working life. Dow N Theyre out a business where they're incharge of purchasing or a large part of their job is purchasing and they'rehaving to fax and order through. You know, butit's like that, just doesn'tmake any sense at all. It's so inefficient and it but it. But ifyou've grown up in the B tob purchasing space you know, is a company buyingbuyinging, some other companies, it...

...your kind of used to the norm, but Ithink now the the why this would be. If I was buying this product at home, itwould be so much easier than I have when when I'm buying in the office. Whycan't we bake that simpler? And I think that's that's the effect which iscoming into to all businesses nor sectors these days, and you can tellhow much of an opportunity it is by quite how much Amazon are doing withtheir Amazon business accounts. These days, theythey've spotted thisopportunity to and and and I think, once Amazon jumps into something youknow you've got to start paying attention to hit yeah with out a debt.When we, when we work with clients, I always ask hi th, beginning of everyworkshop. You know who in here has an Amazon prime account, and we do I meanprimarily, be to be, and so everybody raises heur hand or almost everybodyright, and then you start to talk about why hen. It leads into thatconversation that you know it's funny. Sales raps TAT are in btob. Don't thinkabout the fact that these BTB buyers are living BTC lives, so there thexpectations are being crafted by the ability to go on Amazon, get whateveryou want within. You know: Twenty Four fortyih hours, seemless easyfrictionless right and now those beautaby buyers are expecting that andit changes the game. It changes the game in how companies make themselvesavailable and how you know. Beateby buyers want to be interacted with fromsales people yeah mean. I know it's reached the point in the UK and I wouldassun this is the same stateside as well. In that now some companies arewhen they're tendering to find new supplies. You know s big contracts andall the rest of it. They are not interested in signing up that person asthat company as a supplier, if they don't have an online ordering system.That is part of the tender requirements which you know is woul just causesomething of a landyou know kind of a rush to the to the website. Builders.Oh my God. We can't Lo, you know, retendering and a client goes up by theway. We need you to be ECOMMERCE Whoa,...

...so I think there's there's definitelyfor for the listeners out there who haven't yet embraced online selling aspart of their business. I think it's time it's time to: U, you want to do itin your own time. You don't want to be forced to do it by your biggestcustomer, Tornin runningane. Oh, you know that contract negotiation with sixsix months through and h the signing day is two weeks await. Did you noticethat we needed you to be converse yeah, it's something you want to get ahead ofwell yeah and you definitely definitely want to be proactive instead ofreactive right. If you react, if you're not going to have the time to thinkabout it, how is it going to impact your organization as a whole? How doyou change the way that the sellers are selling our marketers or marketing? Howyou know it's not just as simple as throwing up an an online portal and say:Okay, you can buy he stuff online right. There's, there's a lot of ramificationsand I think a lot of people. Companies in general have a tendency to look atsomething like you, commerce, and think it's a bolt on I just I have to do itso I'll, throw something up. Well, it's yeah! You can do that. I mean we've allseen. Companies Tot do it, but you know what we're not talking about them.We're talking about the companies that think about it proactively, like Amazonright, the ones that are being strategic about it understand thatmoves like this can affect. You know the entire organization. Let's think, if you can just throw up awebsite for probably about twenty percent of the effort, then it's goingto take you to do it properly and that's a thats, a massive difference inan amount of effort, but the problem is, if you just throw it up, you're gonnacause problems because it won't be integrated to your systems. So thesecond someone actually uses it. You've got problems, and if you just chuck it up there, youprobably not built it the way the customers need it to work all the way.The sales team need it to work and the thing is the sales team, whetherthey're based in the office, you know dealing with phone calls or whetherthey're out on the road they have got to be bought in to the online salesopportunity or it's never going to work, because getting the customer to adoptonline ordering is a going to become a crucial part of your sales team's job.So you have to bring the whole company...

...along in the journey. If it's going towork when's the last time you shoped at em, all how will we do our holidayshopping or even buy toilet paper and ten years? Listen for shopcast. TalkingRetail Strategy will explore the mass of changes happening in retail, joinretail expert, Michael Dark and his guests, who help you understand thesedramatic shifts and fordit. What the retail landscape of tomorrow will looklike if you're interested in the future of retail tune in on Fridays at sevenAm Pacific Time and Tenay Im eastern time on voice America business. Howmany companies have we both worked with where you watch the change, changeinitiatives and I'm doing the air quotes right that they? Oh we're goingto we're going to make some changes and we're going to transform Wrighteverybody talks about digital transrmation, and then you come backsix months later, like wow. How did that go yeah? Well, I never really got finishedas a nice dew poster on the wall. EAH and we've all got some new mouse mats,but other than that. Nothing really happened. Yeah mean it's funny, though,because the I see this a lot right. You see people, you know, there's this allright, we're in a digital landscape, w the world is digital now, and peoplefocus on that, but they get so sometimes focused on okay. I need to dothis digital portion that they forget about the human component. How do Imake this work inside of in an organization or with people? How dothey? How do I get them to interact in a way? Let's going to drive greatergrowth, greater return, greater value for not only my internal organizationbut, of course, the customers that I'm interacting with it's, not a simple,it's not as simple as many people, I think want it to be. No, and it's the the good thing forthat. I think for the be to B world is that you can learn from what happenedin the Beto s world, because in the consumer world fifteen years ago, the biggest problem for multichannelretaeson. If the high street retailer was that they were embracing online,but not bringing their store teams...

...along with them, and they had exactlythe same problems with you know, bonus allocations and sales targets andyou're cannibalizing my sales and all the rest of it and which is exactly thesame as the beater b world is going through now as they bring websites on. You knowcommerce websites online. So you the way e the retail world solved. It wasby making it a whole company objective, a whole company roll out, not just the marketing team or the IT team orthe finance team, whichever one ended up driving it. But it has to beeverybody involved from the point where you make the decision to do it throughto delivery and the rest of it Ik challenging well, and that holisticapproach is one that I think you know, especially this organizations getlarger, becomes at sometimes more difficult right, because you've gotit's not just like all right, I'm going to put up be commerce and I got to getthe marketing team aligned in it. Now I've got cymersecurity issues, I've gotGDPR, you know, I've got dat, a compliance issues, it's it. There is no simple and fast answer. I mean you cando it simple and fast, but that you know when we do the podcast oncompanies. Ta faild you'll probably be on that list. You know if you need to,if you need to really think strategically about it, you need to bethinking about that whole and with the retailers it was all always struck meas funny in the US we had. I was a company called Dick Sporting goods andthey had these awesome stores. But then, if I you know, I was in the store, Idon't have time to get this right. Now, just go horderd online. There was neverthey never had the same stuff online. It was like it was like working with acompletely different company, and then I dug into it I found out it actuallywas a completely different company, they'd outsourced their entire onlinebuying experience. So it was like we'll just call this something else, don'tbecause your fractionand that experience for me exactly- and I like the fact you sayyou know, once your online- you have to worry about things like gdpr and fraudand payment gateways Esik. Well, actually, I think the online world justkind of brings those into sharper relief because actually, as a I dea,with a lot of online, only businesses,...

I also deal with businesses that havebig cool centers and physical stores and trust me. It's considerably easierto be GD, DDPR compliant, and you know, payment, processing, Complian and allthe rest of it. If you are online only because everything happens in systems,whereas if you've got people on the ground, dealing with orders and data,you've got a whole load of additional risk which which exists, but peopledon't think about it until you get init online and then suddenly we startthinking about everything that could go wrong. So it's yeah, it's like GDPR and PCIDSS. Theystill exist but don't think about them in the offline world, despite the factthey're far risker in the offlying world yeah. Well, I mean everybody'sjust to hearing about you know the experience, data breaches or target or-or you know all this facebook stuff and I'll. Tell you the one time that I hadmy credit card stolen. It was because it was. I was in a restaurant andsomebody copied the card in the back. It had nothing to do with being onlineand booking my reservation or you know say: Hey it's an anniversary o whateverI want specially with none of that. I just handed my car to someboddy andthey ran it and apparently ran it through another scanner as well. Thenext thing I know I'm getting calls from American Express he did you order.You know four hundred pounds of of Bican Meat S, I'm like that. No, Ididn't, strangely enough tslike friend of mine, used to work fora company who had a kind of like a workshop sales outlet where theworkshop guys would oftend to be the anyone's there s. They take customerorders over the phone as well and about every couple of months. My friend, whovisited their occasionally would have to shred the little book in which theykept everybody's credit card number because it made it easier for thecustomer, like it didn't matter how many timesthey were told you cannot do this. They had the whole thing. You know ththis code on the back, the dates everything next door, the Castis gainjust a just in a note pad sitting on top of the desk. So you can't do thisguys, so sorry, Otake Thas, on a big...

...out tangent. Oh No! No! That's! I meanthat's great. It's like you know it's funny when, when we talk about hat thatmerging o of digital and physical or digital and human experience, you knowI hadn't honestly until you brought up. I had because I deal mostly withcompanies that are all systems based an the may not have brick and mortarlocations, but when you think about that, that is a huge gap in data youknow and protecting the data and you're. Also when you're doing your commerce,there has to be a level of trust. I mean I'm old enough to remember whenyou know. I said something to my mom, like no mom just put your credit cardin and they'll ship it to you, so I'm not giving them my credit card number,I'm not doing that. Well, we've gotten a little bit better right. Everybodykind of I think, we've kind of gotten over that hurtle, but there's still atrust that has to take place in that brand experience in that sales, ttransaction there's a little a trust that has to be there and and G. I meangdpris, making it it not so much more hey. I trust you it's a you need to dothis right, but I mean at the end of the day, if people aren't going totrust the company, you know in the way that they're going to interact withthem, then it creates friction and they'll just go somewhere, where it'seasier exactly, and I think that's. We mentioned that. There's a lot that interms of bringing the team along that the BTB wor could learn from the be tose Wer when it comes to EA commerce, but I think one of the things which hasbecome difficult more difficult over the last fifteen years and your DickSporting goods example kind of illustrates this is that back fifteen years ago you could put upa website and the customer had low expectations of whaut. The experiencewould be Li yeah and nowadays that experience has to be as good as yourexperience in any other channel. Otherwise you are detrimentallyaffecting your primary channel, so you can't well you can say this is a beater.We've only put such and such stock lines up there, but that beater has towork. You know you can kind of do it as a phased approach, but it, but anythingyou put life- has to work and has to...

...work well and has to meet all theexpectations of observice that people know of generally foronline, but alsowhat they understand in terms of their Relat Exist: Yon, Ren Ationship withyour business. So it's got a lot harder over the last fifteen years, but thethe tech is a lot more available to make it easier. That makes sense, yeah.Well a! I think. It's given gotten to the point where I think Maye we'vegotten a point, were the tech, the promise of the techmade it easier andthen- and we saw all those investments in customer experience right. You knowapple with the attune stuff and all of the applications there's one actuallyout of Ouka glass box, digital that watches you, you know, watches how youinteract with the Webpag, so they can, they can fix and tweak the userexperience and the design and things like that N. I think we've got n apoint where the tach has gotten so much better, but there's so much more of itthat even making those decisions on you know hey. I need to do you know Xynzor.This is what my text ack should look like. It becomes even more difficultfor them to keep that overall experience in mind as they're doing it,because there are so many technical considerations and I think the TEC canbe a big old distraction as well. I think it's very easy to get sucked intoa complex piece of tech to try and solve a problem which actually was thefact that the fir you know the big line. The big text, information on the frontpage of your home page went some one lands on the website. Just didn'texplain what you' Do you know iti was. It was at a conference wordoing a lot of growt hacking sessions lot late last year and it was a realpleasure to see one of the world authorities on growth. Hacking talkabout how getting the wording right on the first view of your homepad is oneof the most important things you can do to grow tack. Your website, Ihale Luiasoone's, talking about some sents, not mean ear plenty of exciting cool littletools you can use, but it was also just well an the teck has a tendency, Ithink. Sometimes I think the distraction aspect is spot on rightbecause we see it especially in sales. As the millennials come up. We seepeople hiding behind the tech, they...

...think. Oh well, I had a chatbot thatalk to them on my website that drove them. To my you know, product pagewhich then took them Tito the card, and I don't need to talk to them or if I'mtrying to prospect somebody, maybe I'll, just go to linked in I'll shoot him anemail, maybe maybe maybe I'll shoot them a text but they're looking at itin a way that continues to increase the divide from that human to humaninteraction and at the end of the day, that's what it gets stuff done is thathuman emen interaction- and I think people have a tendency to look at thattech and go. This is going to solve my problems. Well, you know what we reallyshould be looking at the same fundamentals that have been in playbecause people are still people. So true, one of one of my past podcastguests is a guy who runs a Beeto, be site. That's called Ramp Tshirt, as inyou know, you drive your car up the ramp and their aim from day Ome was to createthe world's fastest Tshir ordering website. So you go, you know if youneed tshirts forey, to give away to your customers or to give away at yourconference or, if you sals team, to wear there, the siht to go to to getyour your tshirts ordered they've gone tothe point of building an algorithm that will predict the sizing mix you use.You know it's all about speed, go through the wors hat. They haveconversionray optimized it to the absolute enth degree, go weter, that'sawesome! It's very cool, however. Eighty percent of their orders are placed by people. Who've had somelevel of human interaction before they hit the Bybun Oye that' for in every five have livechatted, sent in an email or done something to talk to their team beforethey place the order- and this is a website which has been taken to theenth degree of you- don't need to speak to us and yeah you're still speaking to US exactly, which is why you know thesales team are remain hugely important...

...even in the online world, because it'sstill in the btob space. Huge amounts of of it is still about that personalrelationship and that reassurance and that that guidance through the process yeahand there's always I mean there's that aspect of the online, especially in YeuCommerce, with Selfservice- and I do this all the time and we use a companycalled mimeo to print our workbooks, our journals. You know things like thatand it's on demand, which is great and it is kind of set up, so I never havetalked to him. But what do I do every time I play some order. I called dereckbecause I need dereck to double Checke derr double check this, because I'm nota hundred percent sure that I got it right and I don't have time to screw itup. So hey you got any ideas on how I could do this that or the other I meanit woald set up. So I never have to talk to anybody, but I don't hit the bybutton, for you know thousand dollars tensanddollars worth of workbooks untilI've talked to somebody, it just makes me feel better, yeah, so tra, and sowhen we look at the ECOMMERCE stuff, there's that aspect of self serviceright an you mentioned this as we were preping for this, so so they bought something right. Theywent through the buying process. Now that now they're quote unquote acustomer. How do you see that selfservice aspect impacting sales andmarketing professionals? I suppose you've got to see it as a asa benefit. You have what you have to see it as a benefit, but it means thatyou now are able to let the customer get on with you know the normal stuffand then give them the value ad, and that might mean you know when you know you know thatyou can set the systems up, so wit automatically alert you if the? U, ifthey haven't placed the order they usually place each week. It means yourconversations with them can be less about getting an order and more about.Have you seen this? This might be good for you there's an offer on this week,so you kind of bringing the value adds to that relationship, rather than justphoning them up to get the order or dealing with the order when they, whenthey phone in so it's it's great. They can do the self service because itmeans the menials not quite the right word, butit's anywhere. I can think of right now...

...so wroll with it the more the moremenial task the customer could do themselves, which means you can putyour effort into Valueidi in that relationship. It also means because ofthat kind of dynamic of your time is pent on more valuable things andthey're doing the kind of like the menial bit is maybe now. This opens upyour business to a group of smaller customers that you could previouslyafford to service, because they're able to you're able to just leave them toget on with it on the website, and likewise it gives your gives you as asales or a marketing professional, more time to go and recruit new customersand bigger customers, because you've got the time to do that because you'renot spending it etting the regular order out of xyzed existing customer well Hso, thenit would allows for optimization. Not only are the customers experience, butalso of the Roy per hour for that sales, investment that that company's making,because they're not focused on the little stuff they're focused on theexpansion upsell things like that yeah. So it's you you have to kind of likeidentify the benefit. Yes, you're, going to be doing less of what you donow, but that's good because it means you cand do more of the things thatgenerate more money generate more bonus, generate all the things you want yeah.So when you work with clients to help a maximizer, you commerce are therecommon challenges that you're seeing them run into these days. Oh Yeah Ot, the warm the number onechallenge is: What should I be doing? Actually that's the number one thing Ihelp people out whirh this Chlari, I'm doing this. Should I be doing it I M. Iwant to send what emails is it okay to send wmat emails? I think I might needa welcome campaign. Do I I've done this? Should I ofe I've done this I's, notworking? What should I do? It's all, there's so many options thesedays. The most challenging problem is working out what to do to generate thesales and the most successful businesses I see in the BTB space andin the BTC space are those who have identified the marketing method or twomethods that work well for them, and...

...just double down and doubled down andoptimized and squeezed every last cent and dollar, and order out of that thatthey can so yeah. And so can you can you share astory? An example. I mean you talk about the ramp. Two shirts guys, butwhere one of your clients, you know you help them make these shifts to helpthem wrestle the ECOMMERCE dragon so to speak, and you know what kind of impactor success have they seen, people that are now maybe conversed to theunderstanding how you commerce can benefit them? Oh Man, that's a trickyone SI'm trying to I'm trying to think of a client where I'm allowed to tellyou where I've done. I can tell you about a podcast guest.He's works double down if that's okay, so this is not someone. I've workedwith everybody out there, but this is the sort of thing I help. People do just to be clear. So this is a companycalled flair audio who are in the UK selling globally they've reinvented, loudspeakers and they're slowly takingtheir technology around earphones for the consumers. They'vegone from big loudspeakers for events to if you can have an aerphone cellfrom fifty quid appair to, I think eight hundred pounds for Itno in itearphones, yeah, crazy Ey. So they came upt this amazing technogy and they arebeautiful. They are super powerful and they are. They have got some of themost amazing testimonials on their website from awesome people in themusic industry, and they have they've just gone for it with facebook, andthey did five point nine million last year, pounds that is in Internover,which is a two hundred and fifty percent growth rate on the previousyear, almost entirely driven by Faceboo capitizing, wow wow. So US Tahink, that's a great one,that's a great one and so t did they have they figured out the...

...the you know the? How do you align theECOMMERCE and the online port proportion with the sales? Have theyalso looked doutor? Did they just completely focus on the digital side,with the advertising and driving the commers they've just gone for thedigital side, although saying that a they do have a number of stockists andthey also sell vi Amazons. So they do a proportion of their spend on facebecause also just pure brand advertising to support their stockissof their business customers and to to support their own sales and Amazon. Sothey come a bit of a two prong attack over perfect all right. So let's changedirection a little bit. I ask all of our guess kind of two standardquestions at the end of each interview in the first is simply as a revenueexecutive yourself. You run on a company here. You know that makes you a quote: UNQUOTE:Prospect for most sales people or a target. If we're being blunt- and soI'm curious, it's a big topic in sales. You know howdo you get the attention of somebody? You don't know. So I'm curious whensomebody wants to approach you with a potential solution or something thatthey think would be valuable for you what's the best way for them to captureyour attention and build credibility. Ah, I have such a love hate relationshipwith sales people, because because if they get me in theright way at the right time of the right thing, I love them. Otherwise, no Tis Mat just, but that as a salespersonmyself, I know that that's the game, isn't it so my advice to be okay, I amI'm very much an introvert, so I hate phone cals with passion, and I, like people o give me detazingme far. So those those intriguing emails that some people send that arelike Hey Chlo. I've got something really interesting: it'll totallychange your world. Just spam is ogain anyway. If you sentme an email which proves you've done a little bit of research and which showsthat...

...this might be of relevance to me, youknow we do this actually tell me what you do, becausequite often people don't tell me what they do. Tell me what you do tell mehow you think it might help me and show you have some understanding of what Ido. then. I will almost certainly get back to you like ninety nine percent. Iwill get back to you and I will probably either say: Let's have a chator that's a cute. That's not tolk k threefor me or that's not to key for get back in contact with me. If you give methe details, I can prioritize it and save you time and save me time. Unfortunately, because I have the wordecommerce in my business name again for a lot of messages from people who thinkI'm ane commerce, business yeah, which is kind of crazy. We've got this greattool for checking fraud on your chop, IFFI conof. I don't have a shop F, ficount and thougts, not a problem for me, but you just keep selling me this evens,so sorry run over H. No, that's great! Iean it's great right. You got to do your homework and you got to berespectful, get right to the point right and it's a common theme right. Weinterviewed the CTO of the Minnesota Vikings, a bigNFL football team and- and he said, look you know people want to work withthe NFL. They want to work with us and he goes guess what I will pick up. Thephone he's like. But if I pick up the phone- and you ask me what my emailaddress is rather than saying hey, I have your email dress as let me confirmit or you don't know my name, I'm hanging up on you, it's like be respectful. Do YourHomework, get straight to the point realize it's an interruption and you'vegot to provide value, an insight, and I, like the you know, some people likephone calls. Some people don't so you know knowing that. I think you knowfiguring. That out is probably an important play too. All right. So last question: We call it:okay, our acceleration insight e little marketing term. If there's one thingthat you could tell sales marketing professional services, people one pieceof advice that if they listened, which is always the Cavean, if they listened,you believe, would give them...

...leg up on hitting their targets andbeing successful. What would it be and why that's a tricky one I'm torn betweentwo? So I'm going to go with the one that Ilove the most, which is kind of color coding, your diary and ring fencingtime. So, as I know from from doing sales for my business, which I've beendoing, I've been doing sells myself for probably about ten years now you can you've got that balancing actbetween fresh leads hot prospects contracts,you're tracing it. You know those different levels and all are equallyimportant if you're going to continue hitting your Salles targets week afterweek, day after day month after month. So if you can create some kind ofzoning in your diary of right Monday morning, I'm going to spend dealingwith contracts that are pending being signed and then Tuesdays. I will spendworking on new proposals, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays. I can then dealwith whatever's most urgent going on and Leead Jen, but I think if you colorcode, then you can kind of avoid the day running away with itself, and youcan make sure that those all important tasks which aren't kind of like lyingfor your attention, still get done. So that would be my advice. forver time.blacking is a big one, and it's funny to me that more people don't do it,especially as we get more and more busy and there's more nd more demands forour attention. It is definitely a best practice. I appreciate you highlightingthat one, so all right Clo, if a listeners interested in learning moreabout you, commerce, master plan or actually wait. Let me back up a secondgive me the name of the PODCAST, so we can get some of our listeners to tuneinto what you're doing yeah show it's the ECOMUS master plan, podcast, perfoset, okay, and so out thereeverybody listen check out that podcast. What's the easiest way to get in touchwith you, if somebody would wanted to explorekind of what you're doing and see what else, what else you're offering outthere sow you can find details of everything I'up to ECOMMERCE,Masterplan, Om and you'll be able to...

...there's a contact page there, whichgives you detas Apor to get in contact with me. I'm also pretty easy to findon linked in so feel free to get in contact with me and connect there too,and I have a lot of things we've been talking about today are covered in myrecent book. I is called BTB E commerce master plan, that's available in allthe formats on the big old Amazon platformexcellent clear. I can't thinkyou eknough for taking time today its been great having Y. U, on the show, Ithank yhat. I have thoroughly enjoyed chasting with you. It's been a pleasureall right, everyone that does it for this episode. You know the drillcheckus out on B, to B revizeccom share with friends families coworkers sing itfrom the mountain tops right us a review. Let us know who else you'd liketo have on the show, and until next time we have valued prime solutionswith you all nothing, but the greatest success you've been listening to the BTBrevenue executive experience to ensure that you never miss an episodesubscribe to the show, an itunes for your favorite podcast player. Thank youso much for listening until next time.

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