The B2B Revenue Executive Experience
The B2B Revenue Executive Experience

Episode · 4 years ago

Brian Turner on Why Revenue Should Be Used as a Trailing (Although Critical) Indicator of Business Health

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

“Revenue should not be your leading indicator.”

Come again?

That’s the claim made by Brian Turner, General Manager with Slalom. Brian says that while revenue is absolutely a critical indicator of the health of your business, you run into problems when you make it the leading indicator. You solution your rate and structure around a dollar, and you can backend the most important part of the solution—the value you bring to the client.

Find a breakdown of this episode here.

... Your answer is value prime solutions, a sales training and marketing optimization company leveraging the value selling framework. visit www dot value prime solutionscom and start accelerating your results. You're listening to the BDB revenue executive experience, a podcast dedicated to helping the executives train their sales and marketing teams to optimize growth. Whether you're looking for techniques and strategies or tools and resources, you've come to the right place. Let's accelerate your growth in three, two, one. Welcome everyone to the be tob revenue executive experience. I'm your host, Chad Sanderson. Today we have with US Brian Turner, General Manager with slow and consulting, and as we prep for the show, we decided to focus our conversation primarily on a revenue should actually be viewed as a trailing, although critical, indicator of the health of Your Business. Now, I know for many of our listeners that probably sounds like here say we're all after revenue, helping our customers get more of revenue, making more money. But considering the increase in the number of reports were seeing out there around sales experience, what buyers expect. It's pretty important perspective. Wanted to spend some time with Brian and capture so. Bran, first, thank you very much for taking time to be with us today. Thank you, Jad, appreciate it. This is a subject near and dear to our hearts. Flow them as we as we figure out our next path and grow. We own a billion. Excellent. So little twistraight out of the game. I like to try and front load some of the value for this, for the podcast, for our listeners, and so I start usually with asking you know, each of our guests, if you think back over the course of your career and there was a defining moment, something that happened maybe change of course your career, give you a lesson that you learned that you still apply today. I'd like to can understand what that is, what less you learned and how it affected your career. Yeah, you know, it really was the the precipice for how the start up to slow them Denver Office, and it had to do it. Just transparency, accountability and you know, for me it was as many of as it seeing. You know, you get into the the trenches on a tough project and you're working through different items and at some point, when the partnership is strong, you just kind of succumbed to the fact that you're in this together. And how do you figure out how to do the right thing? That transparency for me. Obviously you work through it, you get the do overall solution, the overall program, the liver that kind of a fun part in the easy part to look at a success. But what I found was the extreme efficiency of being transparent, of taking complete accountability, of taking ownership and of that being a two way street. Always the best way to find a solution, no matter how big the problem. So there's a pretty poignant program project I was on with the client to be unnamed, in my old day and, if you know, I was a partner with the Big Five, and we sat down and we're just able to get inside our bubble as a partnership between and you know, rather than two companies, two teams partnering and being...

...completely transparent, and it was amazing how quickly it turned around a complex program and delivered it as a team. That just watching that, I realize there is a huge sweet spot for just doubling down on the level of services that you can provide and just having partnerships rather than, you know, a solution driving the problem, but a team. So I can think of the exact client, I can think of the exact program but I think the bottom line lesson that we've driven through our culture here is just that efficiency, transparency, partnership, ownership and mutual accountability. Its transparencies is excellent in concept and when people can embrace it it is phenomenal. I agree with you. It can be uncomfortable for some, though right. I mean it requires a level of accountability and authenticity that can be a challenge for some individuals. I'm curious how you guys overcame that at Sloan. Yeah, you know, you've got to create a culture throughout, which is an interesting place from a consulting perspective, but a culture of learning in a culture of you know, it's positive to be wrong if you're learning from the getting better and moving forward. You've seen it before. You get into that Noor mentality, whether you're in sale, whether services, you're going to get yourself into trouble and unless you're well, you know, one of the few that the truly knows more than everybody else, as opposed to, you know, really driving a culture of what do we learn? What do we grow? Where did we bring value? And it pretty quickly freeze up and in it's pretty it is contagious throughout the organization. People get hungry for it turns we able to sit at the table and, you know, truly ask questions around a solution and be listening for answers rather than be listening for a spot to put your answer. And if that makes sense, yeah, completely, completely not. I have to ask. Iway was doing my homework and I noticed you have a degree from Berkeley in molecular biology. How did you end up going from molecular biology into the big five and then into Sloane? Well, it turns out number one, I don't like blood. I don't think you're alone there. I don't know. You Know Vasil Vegel, but you start cutting things up in front of me and I don't feel so good. Makes lift. You know, I was getting out of Berkeley and in the early mid S, just before thecom boom, and you know technology, it was obviously dominant and I had had some catching up to do. So I can you know I jumped into technology firm within the big five because I thought it was pretty exciting and someone who was going to give me a computer and teach me how to use it. So that was fun. Number two, the the logic that you have a milectar cell biology does directly apply. Over, still equational, they're still solutions. You're still analyzing variables data and understanding kind of the best approach and I like the idea of at the end you know if the answer was correct or not. is obviously a little more gray area when it comes to, you know, solutioning with an it, but again you can point to the success on the value criteria and and and that's that's still something that comforts me. So probably more connection than you think. And can there's left blood and consulting. Yeah, it's I guess it's the pens on the client, but yeah,...

...without a doubt. So when we were prepping for the interview we wanted to talk about revenue as a critical, all the cups trailing indicator of success and health of the business and unpack that a little bit for our listeners and help provide a little bit more context. Yeah, you know, and it's by no means the point to revenue not being a critical indicator of the health of Your Business. But for me across the twenty, five, thirty years I've been doing this, when you're going after revenue is the leading indicator. You're solutioning around that dollar. You're solutioning around, you know, the rates, the structure, the items, and then you can back in the most important part of the solution, which is the value you're bringing. And you know, for us you start to look at what is the value? Are you doing the right thing? Are you truly solving your customers problems in the manner they need them solved, rather than, you know, applying your tools and selling the tools or appts you have to try to solve their problems or try to apply them as they will. Those things again, you know, can have some short term wins. The long term, as you're trying to create a brand and really own a market as well as, you know, a culture within your organization, you'll fall short. Now that being said, the revenue indicators absolutely critical in the store. If you think of you know you need your values, you need to be the clear North Star. You need a great culture were within there, especially if you're your business, as ours is, your people and that's your product and then you know how how you deliver that product and how that product is being received in the market and the value it's creating. Eventually, you look at those revenue numbers and they are the clear foundation that not only show up the business is successful, but allow you to adjust and, you know, invest in a variety of the asset you would need to to continue improve your business and evolved excellent. And so I'm curious. There's a you know, everybody that I work with or do is always talks about what's the number of the quarter or for the half or for the year? Where the annual targs? What's the revenue, market share, stuff like that. By not focusing on it, is that enabled largely because you guys are a private company, or do you think if you were public and head Cherils at the answer to Wall Street, that it would be as let's say, I don't say easy, but that it would be as simple perhaps? Yeah, you know, and it ties into the leading versus trailing indicator and it really for us, allows us to be proactive versus reactive to you know, our clients need. Even what I mean by that is, you know, we still look at, obviously daily weekly, monthly, quarterly, annual revenue. You still have to break things in a measurable chunks to be able to analyze them. But, having said we don't have to react to them right. If you're answering the shareholders and they want to know exactly what you're going to deliver in a quarter and in a better number, no matter what the story outweighs a longer term statement or vision, you can get into trouble. And if you know, if I use an example, if you were to take you know something is simple as of resources and people as your biggest asset and it's who you are as a company. In Our business I've seen private companies have to make decisions on hiring and firing based on...

...a three month projection. And if you have a person that's been with you for ten years, you know they're an excellent resource. But for some reason, you know, Hiccup on a client or you know a market or oil and gases, and doing what you thought it was as he start making moves to get rid of people, to start looking at a number. Ay, that's the wrong thing to do for a culture. You're never going to build the loyalty in the culture that you want. But number two, if you just look at up from a dollars and sense perspective, you're going to have to spend how much money to rehire that person in the business value in the cost and the inefficiency are creating there is is an amazing one if you do the analysis. But to get an answer in a short term and a quartered answer to a shareholder. I've seen moves like that made. They're completely inappropriate. So, both from a culture perspective from a dollar perspective, it just gives you a freedom to look at the strategy of Your Business in a much more flowing way. Strategically, you still need to make moves, you still need to, you know, stay efficient, but you don't have to answer to a calendar date. That's forcing some of those decisions and, more importantly, you know you start talking to the board in shareholders, you can make move short term that you could have gotten over a hume quicker and had a much better foundation long term. And it seems to be working. I mean you guys are growing, you know, amazing you mentioned earlier, headed towards a billion dollars organization. That's pretty dimmpressive right. So normally I ask and expect when I ask you know what's the biggest challenge these days that you're facing? Most of the people I talk to are most of the clients that work with. So we need more leads? Are we need more revenue? One of the two. I know from talking to Eric that things are going very well. So I'm curious when you look at, you know, specifically Denver, maybe slow them as a whole. What are the biggest challenges? And does being private and focusing on a longer termin does that change the challenges that kind of rise to the surface as the primary ones? Yeah, you know, and in terms of hit and those two questions, the first one on one, are the biggest challenges as we grow, I point to a lot of companies have a great culture and can keep their arms around their people and can truly partner with their clients in that intimate way that we want to do. And about that billion mark, you can see some of those breaks happen. You know, you need process to deal with that scalability. So for us, the biggest challenge, but it is who we are as I think it'll completely differentiate us as a company and differentiate consulting. Frankly, if we can figure this out. But the biggest challenge will be how we can empower and be scalable, and you know we hit that two, three billion, to be able to bring the appropriate assets and knowledge to our clients while keeping that small local intimacy from a partnership, from an understanding our clients need, from solving their problems rather than applying our solutions. So, you know, the one liner on that is how do we maintain our culture, intimacy, partnership with our clients while taking advantage of the success we've had to bring more assets to those clients to solve their most critical problems? I think the second part of your question, as you talked about a you know what, what's...

...that downside to being of the private company? There's definitely the ability to kind of take care of your people more to make to make decisions for the right reasons and not have some of those outside influences, but there's still, you know, there's a scalability from an investment perspective, from a dollar perspective. You know, I think it probably brings another level of discipline in terms of understanding exactly what all the different factors are you're looking at in a market as well, allows a discipline internally on you know who, what, why and how you're running things. So you can make up for that by just making sure you have that discipline and accountability internally. But yeah, you know, it's kind of like seeing the tax man makes you get some of those extra numbers together that you know, but putting them on payer can show you different things. So just making sure we have enough of that process and diligence to run ourselves in that efficient in appropriate way, but, you know, maintaining the ability to just always do the right thing. Yeah, I mean it's is a delicate balance. For sure. The process to scale without nothing out the that small intimate feel that partners should feel. It in on Sloan's known for I've seen other agency struggle with it and then not correct that nut. So the forward to seeing what you guys were guys do it that as you move forward. When we were emailing back and forth, you started talking about, for things that kind of fall into the circle of business from your perspective, investments in products, investments of people, bull innovation and longer sales life cycle. Can you kind of impact that circle of business for us and how you use it in the Daytoday, operations. Yeah, and you know, it all comes back to bringing value and that is our that's our job, that's our responsibility for our clients is understanding the value were bringing, how we're bringing it. They expect you to have the best people. They expect you to be knowledgeable at their industry and bringing assets and products to make things more efficient. The same time, if you're just bringing all the tools that everybody else brings, you know, no matter how good a friends are on no matter how much you do the right thing and take care of them, they're still an end and end result that rate and the mighty dollar ends up kind of right innovation comes in. They do, they do want you to kind of not only be doing what you do well, but pushing the boundaries and bringing other items. And you know, sometimes it's investing on projects with them, sometimes it's are Awiyebas deal, sometimes it's just being an innovative and, you know, throwing ideas, investing in pilots to kind of show them what could be. And a lot of that takes time. I think you mentioned at the end there that longer, longer sales cycle and that's a that's a tough discipline. It's something we're going through right now. We have, you know, a lot of relationships, where as anybody that sells, you know the best way to sell is you know from the ground, when you're working with the client, know them really well. But the big world and you've got to be able to bring enough value from the outside the interest people to bring, you know, a different level of value when you've already have the partnership and they expect more from you and and you all on some of the paybacks of the time you spent on the ground and understanding. You're both of those parts. And so when you look at keeping the discipline on that longer sale cycle, obviously efficiency is still important. Doesn't mean you're in efficient or...

...you wait more days to make closes or to get the client exactly what they need, but it does mean kind of sitting on your heels and listening and making sure you're solutioning right, just like we talked about earlier on that transparency. In the end, the efficiency gain with that, with that transparency always comes through. It's the same and a sales life cycle right if you can just take that breath, listen make sure you're really getting that solution keeps you from having to go back. I mean there's nothing worse, right, than high fiving as you start to streat process going and then you know your eight weeks in and realize there was a miscommunication on what one person thought they were saying when they said something. So just taking that breass making sure you are clear on everything from the highest level business value propositions through the steps and tools they're going to deliver it through an implementation, absolutely critical. So yeah, when we say longer sales life cycle, it is about that kind of relationship, listening, solutioning or kind of at the ends degree. But it is not, obviously, you know, a slow let's just wait and see how it comes right. So with an organization that scaling and growing as much as slow, there's a lot of that trust that's put on your consultants, right. So how do they how do they listen correctly? How do they interface and deliver on this all and brand deliver on the expertise that expected? I'm curious how, as you grow and add people to the you know, the slalomn family, how do you enable them so there's some level of consistency across the way they interact right is there? Is there a secret sausage? It's something I've seen agencies struggle with. Another consultant he struggle with and as you get bigger on that scale side, I'm curiously how do you as a part of your hiring process, there are certain things are looking for when you're hiring so you get some level of consistency. Is There Training Program or mentor program you guys implement them? It's kind of what I'm aiming at. Yeah, and I think the answers yes, through us, throughout it is you've got to drive. It's so deep in your culture and words are, you know, we all know where words are one thing, but then the actions are bigger, and so you've got to just live it. The number of times we sit around our table and we're looking at anything from a external project that we're working with the client to an internal situation with an employee or a career path or compensation, being able to pull out the a what's the right thing to do here, because we have a clear value of always do the right thing. Let's put that on the table and and again everything everything's never perfect, but if people here when you're balancing back on those items of you know, do the right thing, always smile, enjoy, learn, listen. When they hear you applying those it circles itself on that culture. So from you know, when we're interviewing people, I'm usually the last interview and when you talk to these people coming in you're assuming and they have the skills and assets that they're going to need to bear to kind of solution and solve problems. But we had the culture item right from the front and it's not a bad thing. It's not a you're one of us, you're not. It's really about understanding who they are, how they want to work, what they...

...want to do, what experiences they've seen, how they react at, what their leadership style is, and you can you can drain that and then you can see which which items. You know people may have gaps, but they they're here to evolve those. You know. Did you even within the company? One of our clear items your people. People can leave. From a consulting perspective, we have pretty low AU Christian here, in the twelve thirteen percent range, which for a consulting firm is extremely low, really low. But you know, at the same point Po believe it's a good thing if they go off to be clients if we've evolved in the correct way. And so either there's another clear statement here, which is we want this to be the best stop for someone's career, whether that's one year or ten years or twenty years. It's just about how are you growing, learning, evolving and building your skills and enjoying the team you're working with? You pull that in from the interview process through training. We have very detailed leadership training programs that are about feedback transparency. I think the further up you move from a leadership perspective or from a responsibility perspective in this company, the more feedback you're receiving. And that's the inverse to a lot of companies right and I think you just rain that through and it's it breeds that servant leadership, which breeds kind of the culture of really being comfortable bringing up ideas. You know no idea as incorrect. How you learning, productive, conflict, all those items. It just starts to bleeve throughout the organization. But it's got to be maintained and kind of nourished every day. Yeah, it's not. It's not something you can just talk about and put on the side like you have to live it right, you have to live it. It has to be real, it has to be something that people are experiencing day in and day out. It's impressive. I mean Slom has gotten a number of awards for the culture and reviews from people that have been there. It's that's pretty impressive accomplishment, although, I have to believe, not particularly easy. Do you run into some consultants that come on board at times who maybe aren't is comfortable with that level of transparency or that level of feedback? You know, definitely, it did definitely take some getting used to and I you can still have fatig days on the feedback, but you start to get hungry for it and it's again back to just how efficient the transparency is. You it just it's starts to grow on itself, but it is a challenge and it is I mean we that's we we have a pretty long interview process and you know, you can you can see that on occasion on some of the on some of the social sites and after Kennedy has come through and they're like wow, you guys drain this. I've met so many people. I really feel like I understand the company. I've never walked through a door of a company and really had such a clear vision of what I'm getting into, and others are kind of like a interview. Five still I need a job. Feel those things out, but we continuous feedback. You know, it's it's not always perfect. It's not you know, you've got to understand what those gaps are and then be comfortable with it. It's pretty interesting and we do very detailed survey. It's called an FCS survey for US internally and with our clients. And you know, it's always a tough balance with clients where there I really you're going to send me a survey, give me a task to do, but externally or internally, when they see you hold up the results and then react to them,...

...a lot of our clients, now they're in partnering with s were for a while, look forward to getting that annual survey because they know that, you know, they're going to have a meeting with us to understand what those results are and they're going to see immediate actions. The same thing internally. You know, if you get feedback on everything we're working on around, you know, asset creation, production, career paths, diversity and inclusion, when you hold those things up. As Ida, we got a really bad score here, and you're comfortable with it and you own it and then you kind of walk through, here's some things we're going to try, and then you're even able to hold up you know, whether it's out of quarterly or you know, or monthly calls or whatever you're doing, cocktail hours, ever you're connecting with the team, but you hold those gaps up just as much as you hold the positive items. People start to see it's real. I think the first time our CEO how it to do this. I started back in two thousand and eight any he noticed the initial surveys would get more and more information about the things we need to do better and I equated it to you know, you guess my wife. WHAT CAN BRIAN IMPROVED next year? You might give you a topic or two, but she sees those two topics, improve them and really work hard on them. The next time you give her the survey, she's gonna have about fifteen right not to slug on that attention to it. So so those those surveys have that result. Clients kind of lean in more though. The internal team see how hard we're working on it and it creates a pretty just positive impact in terms of driving and maintaining that culture, because the minute you sit on it, you know that whole day, one day to company, the minute you sit on it you're gonna start to lose the culture and bring we're gonna be able to story on all you're getting big or all re losing this piece or relising that peace in the reality is you've always got to be figuring out what you're what your revolution is, not just to stay ahead of a pack, but just just continue to get better, and that culture becomes critical. I mean you've got okay, so when you hire somebody, you've got to make sure that they're in a place where they can accept that type of feedback, and I've seen it to they do that. I myself included, get hungry for that feedback. Right. Always, always want to get better. The other side of that coin, though, is when you're dealing with the customer, not sometimes, if it's a newer customer, it will be harder. That same consultant that has to be willing to accept feedback has to sometimes be able to tell a client that they're headed in the wrong direction. Right. So it's the other side of that soft skill I'm curious how you guys test for that or or how you enable that across the team, because sometimes your job is to tell the customer that they're wrong, or perhaps there's a better way to do it right. Yeah, no question, and that's you know, there's always an art to the science and it in every situation is different. But we again back to that transparency and it's not it's not a callous transparency, it's not aboud. You just got to get back to here's the values, here's why we're driving this out, here's what we're giving this information. If you're being honest, you're owning it and owning your side of the accountability as well, you know, not just kind of pushing or leading on things that seems simply to communicate. It comes through and it's not always easy. Right. We've had to walk away from clients that you can just tell you won't line up. We've had clients that are surprised when we roll resources off and say, you know,...

...we talked to your CEO and there's an extra value you that we expected to be bringing from slow and you're not getting that in this situation. So we're moving on. As they would be used to services organization and think something like you must be getting a higher rate for that person or a higher rate to that project somewhere else for these racecources. But you just stick to it and you're consistent with it. You do it for the right reasons. Those partnerships are built and they realize that that's really their culture and it builds off itself. They see you doing it with each other and they see you open to that feedback and asking for it and reacting to it. They start to lean in the majority of the time. But it is still a science. Are An art. You know that. You Mix with the science and there's there's times you gotta soft shoot a bit. You have to have the discipline to not give soft messages. There's a you know, there's a difference in being able to say things a productive way and a supportive way and having a strength to be able to walk away. We've had clients where we do assessments over technology. Obviously won't won't go into the exact technologies we're analyzing, but we did a recommendation of technology a and they said Yep, we got it and kind of looking through all the different fact as you told us, we're going to. We're lean with technology, be but we want you to implement it, you know, and it was just pretty interesting to wait a SEC is, if we're partnering with you and we really feel this is better for your business, if they had changed our mind with some variables we hadn't seen or done and let's go down that path. But it was more of a Yep, we agree with you, we understand it, but we have more of these resources. We're going to move down this direction. And you know the reaction initially when we said well, great, but of course we're not going to do that two million dollar implementation because we don't feel it's the best for you. And we did tell you we'd partner with you. Their reaction was kind of like that's cute, but grow up, this is you know, in the end, this is business and we want you to implement it. Then what we did was kind of say, look, we'll continue to support, to walk through, love to you know, sync with you monthly to understand how it's going and make sure our items that we were trying to keep your eye on or accurate, but we can't move down have that program right. It's just so gets back to are you being true to your word, to your values, true to what you're saying to them. Eventually it ends them around and then, you know, say it nicely. They think a little about the exact adjectives were using with clients, persons and voice. I have been known to tell my wife, I don't have a problem with what you're saying, I have a problem with how you're saying all right, so let's change direction here a little bit. We ask all of our guests to standard questions towards the end of the interview. You are, as a revenue executive, your potential prospect or target for some of our listeners. People want to get in front of you, sell you something, solve some problems. I'm curious, from your perspective, what is the most effective way to break through the noise and get your attention, bring something to you that may provide you, the Denver Group Soloven as, a wholesome value? What captures your attention and what seems to work the best? You know, that's a good question and we do get we get a ton of kind of whether it's...

...cold or relationship pushes or items of people connecting, and obviously we have to do that ourselves. So it's ing our our CEO as a two innovator and I think he often, especially as we are growing, we take calls with with sales people to understand the style, the process, how they were doing it and kind of what would enjoy, the back and forth from that perspective, just in that learner mentality. Sure, as I look at myself and I work with our sales team, I look at who we connect with and why. You know, there's the easy things, like having the personal connection from a credibility standpoint or those items. Is Easy, but that can always be the case. So for me it's really when the value proposition they're giving is clear and connected. And what I mean by that is, you know, they they stopped through what I am, who we are, what we do, and they may not understand it all, they understand enough that their initial why they're reaching out to me makes sense from a value perspective. And then it you know, it's the connection at that at that next point, which is that connection in touch. How are you doing it? You know the consistency? Is it customized? Are you able to do it? Obviously, anytime I can grab a a coffee or a beer with someone to really hear them, you'll know in thirty minutes if it's another sales pitch or if they're really listening. And connects back to our GAUS. Are you. Are you understanding what we do, who we are, and then applying what your solution is or what your product is and how it brings value? And at that point it's and then who are you and how do you connect, because there are a lot of great products out there. Actually, is that and so is that type of approach something that you guys are still in in your sales force and work to make sure that they're effective at doing with new customers or new markets or expanding existing accounts? We do, and it's a different approach. Ry To let a lot of my beaty's job, a lot of their responsibility is to make sure we have the best brand in the market and the best reputation. So, you know, they sell. They know from the beginning of their sales cycle whether it's with an existing partner they've known for twenty years or a brand new partner. In the end it's going to be about the value they deliver, and that's not just from a you know, credential perspective or being able to talk to the next client about some of the great work we did. But, you know, their jobs to make sure that we said or we did what we said we were going to do. So they have a big part of that up front, but having them on that close on the back end kind of completes that cycle, if you would, and probably affects how you sell up front as well. Right and knowing, knowing you're going to ask, what was the exact value you expected? We thought it was this and we think we brought it in this fashion. Are you on the same page? You're thinking of those questions from the get go? And then the other end is just be's or great with people or at the emotional intelligence is something we lean on and so they have an ability to create that relationship where they can get the true, the true feedback on how we get better, how we continue and how things are going. The often times, whether it's, you know, from our from a business strategy perspective or from an IP perspective, whichever end of the business were working on,...

...you get in the trench with that client, they may say, yeah, I know things are great because you've been fighting with them, and in the positive way. You know from fighting the battle with them and right and get get in the program done with them so they don't, you know, need to give you that last ten percent. Sometimes you got to encourage that. And then, you know, the beaties the relationship that can truly protect that that's not just being seen as someone who's selling, but circling around really debil check their getting what they want. That's felt and that's where you get kind of the next level of information to evolve with business. And so you know, our beds are comp just as much on kind of what they bring to the market, in the value they deliver, as much as how did it go along the way and how did the client feel? Right, gets back to all the feedback we get in surveys that we can play. That directly applies and to do there in the end. And Yeah, it's it's the balance. It's the same balances and we talk about the value of always doing the right thing. That means always doing right things for clients and always doing the right thing for your people. Those are two two things that it's some you know at times can force you to balance others, but if you concentrate on both of them, you end up with the with the right path interesting so that I should have asked this question question earlier. It's something you just said. Jog It for me that when your beat's work with so in a lot of agencies or consultancies that I've worked with, there's this natural friction right between execution and and beat, your sales. We used to joke, just to interview markshack from KEPMG. We joked about the magic bubble. Right, you always kept the execution in a magic bubble. Let them believe that revenue just kind of fell off the trees. Well, what you're saying sounds like the beads are actually integrated into those teams a lot more cohesively, and I am I understanding that correctly and if so, how has that happened or how have you guys, you know, enabled that to happen? So you are understanding it correctly, and it's, you know, it's being involved throughout that process. Our beds aren't responsible for opening it a door, pitching idea and getting out there, responsible for getting all the right people in the room to bring the right solution and they're a part of everything from creating that solution to creating the staffing for that solution. Understanding the skill sets that are going to be on there and then they're on the check INS throughout the project on how it's going right. And that's not just from a tactical and process perspective, but back to the how the client feeling? How are they doing? Where are we? They're critical to that. So the beads aren't seeing simply as a sales ask that that goes and open stores for us. They are in the leadership meetings, part of the leadership team. I get the best read of the market and how we're doing and how our brand is doing from them. Given internally right, you watch who they want on their teams when it's the most critical personal project for the client. But I right. You know, learn a lot about your people. You Watch which which assets they sell. Of course they get back to the old revenue discussion. Of course the ones to create great revenue they're looking at those. But you know, if there's something that we have a gap in in the business, they'll see it pretty quickly when they're not pushing it or when they shy away from a solution. I mean we need a strength and you know the people and assets we have with in that practice. So they they are absolutely considered a critical part of the team and involved throughout the lifestycle. Now their skill set does...

...have to do with opening and listening and connecting, but at the same point they're they're no more or less a piece of the puzzle of the entire and graded team that brings that solution of the client. Excellent, excellent. I love that perspective. It's difficult. I've seen it's been difficult for some agencies that I've worked with to pull that off. I'm glad to hear that you guys incorporated all the way through. Some just wanted to hey, here's a meeting and bring the smart people, let them close the deal and it kind of falls apart. So I'm glad to hear that you guys are are doing that right. So one one last question for one other one I am on that chat is. You know, if I look at some of the beads, they've been with us for more in a decade and they only serve Colorado. So they're going to see these clients up and down again. So they are predecting not not just in to do the right thing mentality, which they do, but they're protecting their network and that's their job right. There's shops keep their education in there. There their partnerships alive as well. So that is where that kind of local, intimate model I talked about helps. Extremely well connected, I mean from the BEATI's understeam that I've had the chance to speak with and and connect with, very well connected. Definitely have the Denver market as the some on the pulse of the all right, so one last question. I want to be respectful of time, but we ask all of our guest for what we call an acceleration inside. So if you had the opportunity to tell another sales or marketing or professional services executive one piece of advice that you feel like would help them or their teams make their number, beat their targets be better tomorrow than they are today, what would that be and why? Good question, you know, I think it applies even more so to as you talk to sales and marketing and professional services, but I think just in general in life, but especially in those spaces, you can't gain the system right. You do like game things for so long to get a game the system or the process in the end at hard work and effort. Is Hard Work and effort and you're going to need that to be successful. You might build a fine pockets between their but it just comes down to are you putting in the extracycles? Are you following through? Are you addressing those gaps that you know you have? Are you've kind of pushing them off? So back to hard work and effort. Now believe in what you're doing and in back to even how I lean on my bed's now very different from when we're starting out as a company. Still protecting their people, but I would watch every reaction, every person, every asset, every practice that we are buildings. You can learn so much whether they were believing in it or not. So if you're a salesperson or a marketing person, know how much easier is your job. backter that transparency, if you believe in what you're doing, doesn't have to be perfect, which is understand exactly what it is you're doing, where you're bringing the value, all that and believe in it, and then, where there's gaps, how are you addressing those and kind of being transparent on those. But then in the end it all just comes down to he got a work hard and you got to put in the effort and you know if you're being accountable so you can get out there, you support and then you hold yourself just as come back accountable, perfect, perfect. Well, appreciate that insight. All right, everyone. That is the end of this episode. Please check us out at be to be REV exactcom share...

...the episode with friends, families, Co workers. If you like what you here, do me a favorite Rtis or if you want itunes. We're tracking to get into the new and noteworthy over there, so we need to get apples attention. Bright, I can't thank you enough for your time to day. It has been an absolute pleasure to have you on the show. A Jad. Thanks, man, it was a lot of fun. Thanks for letting me chat a little bit, but I got to look forward to seeing seeing where this goes and getting some feedback and and continuing his conversation. It's it's it's critical in today's Day and age on you as your build out services and tell them excellent. Well again, thank you. Thank you everyone for listening and Brian for these invaluable and says. Cannot thank you enough. I'm sure listeners would benefit from them. Until we talk next time with you and the group of Slom, nothing but the greatest success. Thanks. Take care. All Right, you've been listening to the BB revenue executive experience. To ensure that you never miss an episode, subscribe to the show and Itunes or your favorite podcast player. Thank you so much for listening. Until next time,.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (246)