The B2B Revenue Executive Experience
The B2B Revenue Executive Experience

Episode · 4 years ago

Brian Burns on 5 Things That Separate A Players From B Players

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

With the onslaught of artificial intelligence and new technologies impacting the sales profession, the question is often asked: “Will people still be relevant?” It’s generally agreed that yes, salespeople will still be needed – at least those that are the A players.

Brian Burns, host of The Brutal Truth About Sales & Selling, sat down with Chad Sanderson, Managing Partner, Value Prime Solutions to discuss five things that make ultra high performers, or A players, so effective.

You're listening to the BDB revenue executiveexperience, a podcast dedicated to helping the executives train their sales and marketing teamsto optimize growth. Whether you're looking for techniques and strategies or tools and resources, you've come to the right place. Let's accelerate your growth in three,two, one. Welcome everyone to the BDB revenue executive experience. I'm yourhost, Chad Sanderson. Today we're back with Brian Burns and we're going tobe talking about what are the differences between a players and B players in sales? It's extremely relevant topic today, especially with the onslaught of artificial intelligence andthe evolving technology landscape that we're all facing. There's a lot of discussion out thereabout how these new technologies will impact the sales profession. Will it makeyou know, sales, the sales profession, less important? Will that make peopleirrelevant? There's a quote from Jeb Blount that says you know, inthe future there will be sales reps that are told what to do by robotsand those that tell robots what to do. So understanding what it is that makessales professionals, what makes those ultra high performers so effective. What reallygoes into their day to day what goes into their perspective in their approach tothe professions, particularly relevant topping and when? We hope that you will enjoy asBrian Burns and I dive into it. Hey, Chad, let's talk aboutyou know what really you see as far as different prentihaders between B playersand a players? It's a it's a great question when we get asked alot. Right, is there a secret to being better at what I do? Yeah, it's it's number one called prospecting. So and it's funny becauseyou know, especially now as we've got all of these different roles, you'vegot STRs or a drs or they've got all these names for these guys thatare supposed to do all the prospecting and side the meetings. But what happensis account exactly the guys that have the big account that they have a tendencyto get lazy as a result of that...

...thing. God, somebody else isdoing my prospecting for me. Fact of the matter is prospecting is just itshould be part of the DNA of the job. If you're in sales.In my opinion, and so many people are kind of scared to do it. It seems like. Yeah, I think today people are looking at itlike an assembly line as opposed to kind of a partnership but development. Andyou know, I think it all goes back to that separation between hunter andfarmer, and it's like, well, it's a little bit of both,isn't it? I mean, if you think of the biggest deals you've evergotten, it wasn't like, Oh, you called them the first day ofthe quarter and you close them on the last day of the quarter. Itwas you know that they were probably existing customers that you kind of dug into, found new uses for your product, expanded within there and then, youknow, put together some kind of enterprise deal. Yeah, well, andthat's just that. I think a lot of people think of prospecting is nothingmore than net new logos. Well, I mean, the fact the matteris, if you're working, you know, if you're an account wrap, astrategic account rep, key account rep, whatever you want to call it,and you have three accounts, let's say you've got GE, Toyota andFord and that's all you've got, then you still need to be prospecting insideof those organizations. It needs to be something that they're focused on and ithas to be a consistent application of your skill set to try and continually proveprovide value and find problems that you can solve. A lot of people justget, you know, happy with they I closed a multimillion dollar deal andthat's great for maybe this quarter and next quarter, but what's your pipeline looklike after that? Yeah, and I think a lot of people going tofail that in January. That's kind of the wake up call that we allget that first week when we look at our pipeline and go UMP, that'sall smoke. I put that in there thinking it was real and it's not. I haven't talked to them in three months and it's like, I wonderwhy people don't look at that as prospect and they look at it as farming. Or I mean today they call that customer success and it's like well,that I'm used to be called support, but now, in being proactive,it's customer success. But you know, I always looked at it as like, unless those people really happy, because...

...those are your references, you know, those are the people that are going to talk to your new prospects,because you know, they don't care what sales rep says. They care aboutwhat your customers are saying, without a doubt. And it's funny to mewith all of the I think it was it was gay blars, and Iwas talking to about this, we've got all of this stratification of sales right. We went from back in the day when you know, probably you andI started. We all we had to do it all. We had toprocess spect we had to close, we had to expand, you had todo all of it. And as we've seen technology creep in and we've seenthis stratification of roles where everything's getting into these little sidelows and I think itcreates a situation where sales reps, I don't want to say that, Idon't want to make an a just comment. Again, I have a tendency todo that, but I think they have a tendency to think, ohwell, this is my little niche, then I can be a successful salesperson. The the best ones that I've ever worked with, the a players,understand that it is a command of a multitude of skills combined in a consistentway that keeps our pipeline full, keeps them exceeding quota keeps them engaged inproviding value to to the customers. I think we have a tendency to overanalyzethings. I think we've gone a little too far and how we break thingsdown. And I think the best people, the best sales reps today, aregoing to remember that. You know, all of this is one discipline andit requires, you know, command of a great number of skills inorder to pull it off. And I think the a players look at prospectingdifferently. Where the B players? You know that they want to do thehardest thing instead of the smartest thing. It was the heart. Well,the hardest thing is okay, I want to get into, let's say,a fortune ten company, but you have no business being there, right you, maybe you know the company's not big enough. As I mature enough,you know those big companies are laggards, they're not early adopters. And andthen and you place a call into the CEO, you know, which getsto some admin that's three levels below the admin for the CEO, you know, and they're like and everyone, all the managers, love that. Theylove the go getterness about it and yeah,...

...that that's good. It's good effort. And stuff, but it's just not smart. It's, like Ialways say, prospect from the inside out, not from the outside right. Youknow, you know, look at the people you who already sold to. Who did they know? WHO's adjacent to them? Who's you know,who's the next person that would be most likely be interested? And that's kindof smart prospecting. Well, once you're in account, we all know ittakes, you know, x and x amount of effort to get into anaccount more than it does to reap the benefits of when you're already in.But it doesn't mean it's just going to show up right. So if you'rein our just apply your same prospecting principles inside of that existing account, leveragingthose references that give you the credibility. But in order to do it,and I guess it's probably goes to my second point, is that focus.Is that focus in that that understanding of you constantly have to be looking fornew opportunities. It's that's the nature of sales, unless something's changed, andnobody told me. Hey, I mean that point about focus when I whenI talk to, you know, great sales leaders. That's kind of likenumber two, that they're looking for in new candidates is people who are laserfocused, and I got to say that was probably one of my, youknow, key lessons that I learned and maybe I went too far, youknow, because so especially like the holiday season. I look back when Iwas a wrap, I was like the holiday season went by, January cameand it was like, Oh, I should have visited my family. MeWhen which chop? You know, when was Christmas? Wasn't that when noone would answer the phone? That was that Christmas Day, right. Youknow, you can go a little too far, but you can tell thepeople who aren't focused where, you know, they're looking through the crm trying tofigure out what to do. They look at everything is being equal,you know, if you ask them what are your top three deals, theygo, hold on, let me bring them up. They know that theyshould be like you could wake somebody up at two in the morning and theywould know, yeah, it's this, this and this right, you know, and in they would have a plan. They'd have, you know, strategyto close them and they be obsessed...

...about closing them. Go on.That focus is something I you know, I see a lot of reps spenda lot of time with the glorious amounts of distractions that we have. Ohwell, I'm I'm on Linkedin, or I just saw this article or thisguy just posted this. Maybe I it's like now, come on, guys, focus, think about what you're doing, put a plan together, don't justreact right, be proactive. That requires a level of strategic thinking thatI just I'm not seeing in as many sales reps today as as I thinksales managers and sales exects want to see. Yeah, because, I mean,I'm sure you probably get a trying to get guests with a podcast thatthat you know, CEO's are actually a lot easier to get than V pieceof sales. You know, it be piece of sales. are like,what, what does this have to do? A quote? Lea Me alone,right, you know, and unless they're a listener or they know you, if you've already have to build a relationship with them first, before youare what's in it for me? And it's like, okay, let metell you, you'll reach your audience and Oh, okay, they don't getit. They think if it is up marketing thing, and marketing people arelike, Oh, you're going to charge me? Know that they're like theirparanoid because that they think everything's a trick, because they spend their whole day trickingpeople. That's kind of their roles. Like how do we get people?Does he mean their email for my ebook? Right as I okay,but you know that that focus, you know, is really critical and youcan tell the difference because I get, I'm sure you get, a lotof emails from like, you know, the first year, second here salespeople of the first time. You know they're overwhelmed. That's the number onething they tell me. And it's like, well, worry about the number onething, then worry about number two. Don't worry about number ten. Yeah, we do this. We do this exercise and class in our prospectsand class where it's like, okay, I want you to list out everythingyou do in a day, like everything that you do that you believe ispart of Your Work Day listed out. Okay, now go back to thatlist and tell me what percentage of time you spend on that. Now gothrough and rank those what generates the most revenue? And it's this. Tome, it seems kind of like a no brainer, but it's an eyeopening experience be because a lot of them...

...go, man, I'm spending alot of time to shit. That does not matter. It's not going toaffect my number, it's not going to affect my quota, it's not goingto get me further into accounts. And that awareness right, that awareness iscritical if you're going to apply that in any type of focused, repeatable manner. Well, that's it. You know, I always had this saying busy,busy, busy. You know, it's like activity does not equal accomplishmentand and a lot of roll les. All A lot of people all theycare about is being busy and and as a manager that they assume that thatbusyness equals accomplishment and sales. It doesn't. You know, I see a lotof like, you know, CEOS or are are the salesperson. Andthen I'm busy, busy, busy, and there's a lot of those internetstars with it, like they videos about how busy they are and they gointo a conference to speak for free and they're spending a day for it.I go cancel. There's twenty percent of your week right there right. Youknow, it's like, if you're getting paid, that okay, that's isthat your business as a core is it really going to help you? Youknow well, I don't want to see you at for in the morning islike and you see these people age in front of you telling you how busyand how much the hustle and grind it's like. You know, I thinksales is a work smart business, that that's o argument. You here allthe time. I think the only time the real hustle and grind works iswhen it's like door to door or selling cars in the BTC space, whereyou know that the payoff is much higher. But in a betob space it's muchmore about working smart, without a doubt. I mean you only haveso many they called the golden hours, right. You only have so manyhours and day where you can actually get in touch with the people you needto get in touch with in order to fill your pipeline, moveing opportunity forward, expand an account, whatever it may be, and if you're not leveragingthat time as effectively as possible, then you're going to see it and yourboss is going to see it in their boss is going to see it.So it's not a matter of this the beauty of sales, right. It'snot about just looking like I'm busy. You have to produce results and measurementof results and sales is rather simple.

To take all the ai out ofit, take all of the complex crm crap out of it. At theend of the day, results are simple. Did you close the deals and andfulfill whatever the quota was that was set out for you? It's airbe either did it or you didn't, and if you didn't, maybe getanother quarter to you know, kind of you know, backfel maybe try itagain. Maybe it's, you know, performance improvement plan or whatever it is. But it's not like any other profession. This is a or be. Youeither did it or you didn't. Right, yeah, because no one'sgoing to believe or buy. Oh, you took me out of the youknow, the field for a week for this or that, some meeting,some announcement, some you know, enablement. Know when no one's going to careat the end of the quarter that shot up. Why didn't you dothis? You know, and then that's why we always lose our vacation time. That you know, funny stories. Remember those. I remember one ofthe last jobs I had. I was the only outside guy and the VPsays, okay, let's go out on a road trip together and we wentfrom, you know, I was in DC at the time, to throughCharlotte to Little Rock, had a meeting and Little Rock and then had toget a connection through Houston. made it into Minnesota that night at like zeropm, and then the next morning we had a drive, you know,two and a half hours and I go what's going on here? Oh,it's a maintenance renewal, and I was like shaking my head. I CallI caught. We're spending a day and a half for a maintenance renewal.I was just like, I mean he loved to be busy, you know, and I'm like, how much is a mate? I mean it wasless than K I. Gold doesn't even pay for the travel this like,I mean it was just insane. Literally, you know, you get to thehotel at thirty and you got to be up at six. You like, Oh, I mean that that right there. Right. So, inconjunction with the I'm busy, busy, busy, I think one of theother things I've seen really good sales reps to do is time management, right, yeah, time blocking here, time...

...management, and it is that analysisof okay, is this hour going to general or this day of travel goingto generate more revenue than other things I could be doing. And that,I guess, it goes back to that critical thinking. It just isn't somethingthat seems to be ingrained. Or maybe you'll see a rep do it fora week or two and then they'll get some activity and they'll forget that theirconsistency is what's going to produce the results, not chasing the latest sparkly object oractivity. Yeah, I mean, I don't know, but you butI had a consistent regiment every week where I'd be one week in the office, next week on the road and it would be, you know, I'dleave, you know, first thing in the morning, the very first flight, because I knew the plane would be there, you know, unless you'refind out of Rochester, New York. But I mean, if you lookstatistically, the first flight in the morning is the most likely to be ontime because the plane they got, you know, eight hours to get theplane there. Yeah, unfortunately it's like a thirty am would change if you'vegot to get up at thirty, you know, get through security and everythingand you eat breakfast there. But you can make a, you know,a ten am meeting and I always had my meetings at ten am and twoPM and I'd be with managers. It go no, no, let's fillup the whole day and it's like, I'm want to fill it up withtwo great meetings and if you want, we can take somebody out to dinner. But but you know, oh no, we can probably get six meetings inhere. And I go okay. So you get in the car withhim. He's calling people and they don't have time to meet with you.You know, we're getting lost all this crap and I'm like, no onedid. This guy can't make his number. No, and then versus quality tobe right. Yeah, and the next SPAIRT for it. You're goingto get more results. And the next week keep be sick because you knowwe ran himself down. You Know How many times it you go to akickoff meeting and like the thirty percent of the one person shows up with acold. The next two weeks thirty percent of the people now have a cold. The productivity on that as a killer.

Oh yeah, they'll probably. Itjust goes. It just runs through the sales for us and slows everybodydown right. Yeah, was what are they doing all night? They're drinkinghigh five and you know, we're great, WE'RE gonna kill it this year.Yeah, the flue. I mean, if people were more effective at managingtheir time and and focus on, you know, ensuring that they showup ready to provide value, ready to engage in a meaningful way, thento to quality meetings is going to blow the doors off of trying to chasesix crappy meetings and it just yeah, it's that. I feel like.You know, so many people like, Oh, I got to be busy, my calendars got to be insane. Look just like you. I have. I've fifty percent of my week is time blocked out and it's unless there's, you know, something emergency comes up. It's pretty immutable. Like this is, you know, I may move them around a little bit, butI've got half of every day is blocked to do things that are going togenerate revenue and the other half are set up to do things like, youknow, the podcast or get podcast gasts or answer questions or things like that. But if I ever stop, you know, if I go a weekand like, let's say, I didn't do didn't follow my time blocking,then the week after that I start to Itch, I start to them like, okay, I'm not this isn't under control, my pipeline is not good. I missed a week of, you know, prospecting or following up onemails or whatever it is. So the ones, the reps that I seebe the most successful the ones that are really judicious about their time and lookat it strategically. What's going to generate the most revenue? What's going toallow me to be the best prepared for the meetings that I do have?That's it. And if you take, you know, half a day togo to a bone head meeting, that's either unqualified or, and I'm sureyou know, because I've been in jobs where they had the inside reps setup the meetings, kind of like what as d ours do today, andI'd always ask a lot of questions about certain reps because, you know,I go, you know, where is it? Why we meeting their hope, because they would take the meeting and that's not a good reason. Youknow, I'm flying you right, so...

I'm up at thirty. I'm notgoing to be in a good mood if I you know, and one timeit was actually at someone's house, someone's actual residence, and I'm like,oh Lord, that's easily a pretty good giveaway that they're doctor and a saidthey're not quality right, they're not going to give you a million dollars,right, and the two hundred k house. So you get furious and it's likeif you're not ridget with it, if you don't really think through itand you just assume, and you is that happens so many times. Youjust assume they're qualified, you assume they're interested, you assume the timing isright and and people like, okay, having meetings on Friday. Will guesswhat, nobody really wants to meet you on Friday, that they're closing downfor the week, they're thinking about the weekend and come Monday they're not goingto remember you. Yeah, at the end of the day, Sales Repshave a Tennessee to think that plane pure activity alone will generate results, andI would argue that it is the quality of that activity and the quality ofthe focus and the time that people are putting in to make sure that itis going to generate the right results, not just churn a bunch of bubblesin the bathtub and call it a hot tub. You know what I mean? It's just doesn't work that way. It just doesn't work that way andand we see a lot of it. I mean I think I probably comesfrom as I think about it. So the sales exact side now like,well, well, my guys went on twenty four meetings this week, orthey made a hundred and fifty calls. Awesome, great, what were theresults? Yeah, well, next week they're going to make two hundred callsand go on thirty meetings. That's like. Now, quit. It's not justabout that. Let's sit out and think about this. And I'm nota hundred percent sure that sales exacts have the time to do that, dependingon the side of the sales force. But the a players I know,the ultra high performers, they start their weeks usually Sunday nights. Not thatI'm telling anybody out there to go against HR policy and work outside of normalbusiness hours. God forbids my disclaimer. However, the best ones that I'veever worked with Sunday night right there's been...

...in two hours prepent for their week, or it's Saturday morning before the kids get up and they're they're doing alittle bit of research in their plan, in their week or whatever it isso that when they hit the ground they know what they need to do,they're prepared to do it, they're focused on that, don't let anything elseget in the way and they consistently execute week after week. Yeah, that'sit. I'm doing a lot of work with Chris War lab over and goneabout those quality sales conversations and they're trying to change the game by let's getaway from the metrics of number of calls called time and let's focus on like, listen to talk time, you know, peppering of questions, quality of questions, did they close for the next meeting? And and if, Ithink, if managers looked at even reps looked at that, I go youknow, how good was that call, as opposed to did I make thatcall right, you know, and if you, if you did like apost mortem, which I always love doing when I was on the road.That's the only way you get better, because think of how much effort ittakes to get that person either, you know, on a Webex in personor on a, you know, a substantial call, right you know.It's probably, you know what, ten, fifteen hours, oh at least,and I mean I think that Rolls Really Nice and like that fourth pointahead, which is the self awareness. Right. So you talk about qualityand Gongs, phenomenal tool. I mentioned it all the time to clients,like if you guys want to really understand what makes up your how your salesreps are performing on the phone, need a tool like that, right.But it's that self awareness and taking the time to do the post mortems andbeing in a mindset that allows you to actually hear the feedback, right,because a lot of reps, you know, fragile egos. Not, that'stum sayingevery salesperson has it. Just ninety nine percent have fratily, you ghosts, right, and and and it's just part of the game. Like.But in order to really be effective, to truly be self aware of whatyou're doing, how effective it's being, how you can improve, and beingin that right type of mindset to also...

...accept accountability for the Times that youdid well and the Times that you screwed up, and be in a placewhere you can grow and continually involved. It's not easy to do, especiallythe pace we move these days. It's not easy, you know, tobe I guess vulnerable is probably the right word, but but being able tobe in a space where you can take that post mortem feedback, where youcan look at tools that talk to you about the quality of your execution andreally internalize that and make changes in your behaviors. That's a that's a rareskill set as the days go by, at my opinion. Yeah, Imean I was lucky enough early in my career that the CEO of the companywould come on calls with me. Goes. I love going on calls, andhe was the exact opposite of me. I was like the young engineer turnsales guy. He was like the Stanford Grad Air Air Force Academy,you know, you know, bootstrap guy, just, you know, lockdown.I mean he you could put him in front of a crowd and theywould be mesmerized, where I would be like sweating and a little ball ofboom. Yeah. So, you know, I'd work up to get that meetingand I say, Hey, my CEOS in town. He'd really liketo meet you and learn about where you're going. Oh yeah, bring themby, you know, and all I'd have to do is a here's Pauland he would just grab the meeting for an hour and they would just likeboom, boom, boom and we'd get a deal, you know, butevery after call he'd ask me in the car goes, how'd I do?He asked me. Right, you know, I went to night school. Thisguy got an MBA from Stanford. Right now he's running the company.I'm I'm the lowest on the totem pole and he's asking me how he didwell. I mean it's a state leadership approach, though, right. Imean you need all the feedback that you can get, especially, I thinkI think we pay, you know, ultra high performers, not necessarily fortheir abilities to do, you know, cold calling or to do this ordo that, but I honestly think we're paying these days especially for those thatcan, that can critically assess multiple inputs,...

...whether that be feedback, market trends, whatever that may be, and come up with something that is goingto be better than any of those individual components alone. And that ability tocritically assess and to think spatially to bring it all together. I think that'sit's more important in leadership today and especially in complex sales. Yeah, yeah, because you know how there's a huge time gap between the time we're doingthis, because we're not doing you know those type of meetings every day,all day, and you know, we spend so much time to get themthat were kind of out of practice, especially when you do big deals.You you forget about what it's like the very first call because you haven't doneone in two or three months, you know. So you got to kindof like really take a step back and like okay, here is like anhour where, you know, it's I'm trying and I don't know what I'mgoing to face. I don't know right. I don't know what questions, Idon't know what concerns. I don't know if they're angry, happy,growing, shrinking, if they're looking for another job, and it's like you'vegot a kind of be there, you know, maneuvering this in the directionthat you want. You don't know how much they know about you, yourcompany. The problem if they know anything right, you know, and toomany of us go in there assuming that they are. They know, youknow, they spend two hours studying our product in their fifty seven percent throughthe buying side. Would say you don't know that. You know right.Let me, let me share some insights. The Hell Are you? You know, and I think we have to understand that without a doubt. Imean without a doubt. It's just I think it's we have a tendency towant to make sales more complex than it actually is. I mean, yeah, there's a whole bunch of trends and a whole bunch of things that youcan read out there, but if you really look at what makes the mostsuccessful sales professionals successful, like the four things that we've talked about so far, none of that's new. None of that's rocket science right. It isstaying focused on the things that we know...

...work, that allow people to becredible, connect with other individuals and make the most of the time they invest. It just it seems pretty simple to me, but then I don't know. I guess there's just so many things out there today to distract people thatthey think that there's some silver bullet or some better way to do it.I just I haven't seen it yet. I mean to me it's, youknow, it's these four things and that for me. I think the fifthwould be like making sure that the reps are taking time for self improvement andthat maybe that's working out, maybe that's, you know, studying up on theindustry. That you're focused on understanding new trends, you know, continuallyfeeding your head type of stuff. It doesn't have to be a lot,you know, but thirty, forty minutes a week makes a world of differenceand I don't see a lot of people doing that either today. Yeah,and if they do it, they don't apply it or they kind of say, oh, that's a refresher and it's like Oh, yeah, I dothat, or okay, yeah, are you applying it right? That's theyou know, yes, you know, but it's like a magic trick.I try and explain to people. It's like, okay, you know,I have the rabbit up my sleeve, but let me see you pull itout so it doesn't look right and they go, Oh yeah, now youget a Platte. Practice that trick a hundred times so it looks original.It's like comedy, right, there's a lot of there's like a thousand greatcomedy writers for every one great comedian, right, right, because it's thatone great comedian who has the timing and to really deliver the joke. Butthe thousand people could write the same joke now well, and I think that'sa lot like sales. It is, and and that practice that it's amazingto me how many people think, and I probably I've probably been guilty ofthis too at times, as okay, I know how to do this,I've done this a hundred times, and so when I find that I screwup deals, or I have screwed up deals in the past, it's becauseI assumed I knew what the Hell I was doing and didn't go back throughmy checklist or go back through my you know, all right, did Idid? I do it like this. Did I do it? You know, I didn't go back through my own best practices. I got, what'sthe word, unconsciously competent, or I...

...guess it's unconsciously incompetent at that point. But it's like I start. You know, I've done it close multimilliondollars. I know what it takes, I know the micro moments and themicro commitments, all of that stuff. But when I have a tendency togo off the rails and I see other reps go off the rails, it'swhen they get too comfortable with their own knowledge rather than the application of thebest practice as it was taught to them. Right they think they think they're goingto turn it their own. It's like you can't take Shakespeare, changea few sentences and all of a sudden have more Shakespeare. That's not theway it works. It. Shakespeare is very structured type of thing. Soif you're going to engage in that type of profession, like sales, especiallycomplex be toob sales, you have to be as diligent as you would studyingsomething of you that's already been proven and put out there. A lot ofguys just want to do it fast and quick. Back to that more activity, more activity, more activity, right, and they think because they've been doingit for x number of years that they should it should best be natural. But it's nothing. It's that complicated. It's why, you know, chefstill have their recipes up there, because they're going to miss a step. It's just natural. It's why surgeons have checklist, why architects have checklists. You know, okay, this is a hundredth building I built, buthey, if I do it wrong, bad things happen. Yeah, itonly takes one MISSTEP. Just grew up a deal, kill a patient,collapse a building. Right, the people that that are the best at theirdisciplines are the ones that are that stay focused on those best practices and applywhat they have learned. And even as they learn new things, they'll applythem in kind of, I don't want to say a lab environment, butif I'm going to try something new, I'm not going to try it ona ten million dollar deal. I might try it on like a little fivethousand I deal that I don't care if I screw up because I want tosee how it plays in reality. Right. And some people like Oh, Igot this, learned this new thing, they run out and tried it ona CEO for this big seven eight figure deal that they're working and itbackfires. Right. I saw this a lot with when challenger sale first cameout. Only certain people can challenge executives...

...a very large organizations in a waythat doesn't come across as being rude, right, and it's like if they'renot interested in it turns into a debate, it doesn't turn or an argument insteadof an insight. And it's like, if you really think you know someoneelse's business better than them, you better know it right, because ifyou don't, you're probably going to step in a trap that's going to bereal hard to get out of. All right, everybody that does it.For this episode of the B Tob Revenue Executive Experience. Again, thank youto Brian Burns for taking time to do this collaboration. Really enjoying the conversationswe're having. Hope these insights into what makes a players and be players differentwas helpful and insightful for you guys. If you like what you're hearing,please rightister review on itunes. We really do look at those to see whatkind of guess we should bring on, what kind of topics we should cover. It's been a great opportunity to cover this topic with you guys today andagain we value prime solutions with you all nothing but the greatest success. You'vebeen listening to the BB revenue executive experience. To ensure that you never miss anepisode, subscribe to the show in Itunes for your favorite podcast player.Thank you so much for listening. Until next time,.

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