The B2B Revenue Executive Experience
The B2B Revenue Executive Experience

Episode · 4 years ago

Brian Burns on 5 Q1 Mistakes to Avoid

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In Q1 you’re setting the stage for your success in the coming year – at least, you should be. There are typical mistakes we see sales reps make again and again that get in the way of their ability to achieve an ultra high performer status.

We sat down with Brian Burns, host of The Brutal Truth About Sales & Selling, to talk about five mistakes that can be easily avoided in Q1.

You were listening to the BB revenue executive experience, a podcast dedicated to helping the executives train their sales and marketing teams to optimize growth. Whether you're looking for techniques and strategies or tools and resources, you've come to the right place. Let's accelerate your growth in three, two, one. Greetings everyone, and welcome to the B Tob Revenue Executive Experience. I'm your host, Chad Sanderson. Today, Brian Burns and I are going to jump into five mistakes we often see people make in q one, and q one is a sensitive time of the year. It's you set in the stage for your success for the coming months, and there are typical mistakes that we've seen over and over sales reps make the kind of getting the way of their ability to, you know, achieve that ultra high performer status. Even some of the top, top, you know, sales reps that we've worked with there's a couple of mistakes we see consistently from them as well. And so, in order to ensure we're providing you with perspectives that are going to help you be wildly successful this year, bright and I decided to, you know, tap our collective intelligence, for what that's worth, and and our experiences as leader, sales leaders, as well as individual contributors, and put together kind of the list of the top five mistakes we see in q one. So hopefully you can avoid them. Hope you enjoy the conversation. Hey, Chad, what do you see people making big mistakes with and q one? The first and easiest one, and we kind of joked about this before, but I see a lot of reps not leverage or take their sales kickoffs seriously. Right becomes a hey, we're going to VEGAS, we're going to Dallas for four days or we're going to New York, and the jokes start in December about who's going to get the drunkest and pass out and miss a meeting or whatever, depending on what that agenda is. I mean, I I've seen organizations invest quite a bit to make those events extremely valuable for reps, and I think the tendency for reps is a thing, hey, this is a party for a week, rather than really grab every nugget they can from those kickoffs so it can power their year, not only energize them and let them learn and connect with co workers, but some of the content that these that companies put out there is pretty impressive. I mean they bringing guest speakers and we've both done that for companies, kickoffs you have, you have, you know, workshops where you can learn more about the products or, you know, test your skills and some kind of new sales approach or something like that. It's an opportunity to feed your head that I think is kind of unrivaled. I don't see a lot of reps really taking it seriously. Yeah, yeah, I've seen it because I've been on both sides of it. I can't tell you you know, the number of, you know, kickoffs that I've said, right, that's a Rep. and you know, in the last five years, the number of up that I'm I've done. And you know, certainly when you're the presenter up there for a couple of days, it's it's brutal,...

...but it is trying to keep it do. Yeah, well, that's it, especially when you have, you know, hundreds and as opposed to you know, small group. I love the small groups. When you get a you know, in the hundreds and you're supposed to engage them, it's really hard and you know, and you I could basically tell you by what they're doing, how much they're making. Little. You know, I can tell them. Okay, you got the you know, the c players are always sit in the back or playing with their phones all the time. The eight players are sitting right up front. They're coming up with questions, they're interrogating you. Yes, they're really trying to get something out of you, because you know, I'm not a comedian or an actor. You know I'm really there trying to help you make more money. Right, and in that part, if you don't embrace it, you know, argue with somebody, debate it, you know, because that's when you really learned, because that's what you get on the same page. And it is too easy just to kind of sneak out of the room and start calling your clients or surf the way of but whatever else distracts you. Well, and I loved with doing kickoffs halfway through. Typically, you know, if it's a keynote or or if it's a worksout, like halfway through the morning, I'll just stop and I'll say, okay, I want to make a prediction. Those of you that are looking at your phones right now are going to be working someplace else next year. Those of you that are, those of you that are engaged with me, are going to beat your quota, and those that are still trying to figure out why you're in the room, you have a chance. So take a step towards me and I'll take two steps towards you. But I can't do this for you. And and it's funny to see what's happening before I do that. What happens after I do that, and then next year when I'm back, how right was I? Well, that's it. I made it just ignoring them, because if they're not invested in themselves, why should I? But you could just tell you know, I never, never out at anybody, because managers always ask you, like you know who gets it who doesn't. And the thing is in sales that the order takers are not going to survive. No, they're no matter how much you kiss your managers, but those jobs. You know that they're just not going to pay that much for you to process paper. No, yeah, I mean you. You have to. You have to continually evolve yourself, because the vast majority of your customers, or your buyers, are evolving themselves, maybe not proactively, but just as as a result of having kids that are teaching them new technologies and introducing new concepts or businesses that are going to new markets in the new products. If you don't keep up with your skill set, if you don't invest in yourself and take that opportunity and all you want to do is pick up the phone and have somebody right you a check, it's time to look for another job. As far as I'm yeah, and and plus plus. You get the whole most of the company there. You get...

...the marketing people, the product marketing people, the people who build the product, the CEO. I mean, this is the time to build that relationship. I mean how often do you have that opportunity to sit down and with marketing and say look, this is what I need, this is what will help me in sales, rather than, halfway through the year, complaining to your manager that marketing is not providing which want, which kind of seems to be one of those trend lines. Well, they're providing something to somebody. Right, right as well be an ideal with marketing all the time. But marketings magnet is doing what's best for their career, not the company, nor sales. Right. Why? Why do they do that? Because they won't, you know, they want that portfolio and that relationship with you know, the because I deal with this all the time. And it's like, well, is that the best thing for the company? KNOWS, no, it's not. Is that what the sales people are asking for? Nope, that's not what they're asking for, you know. But but we got a time. Sure would look good on your resume now, wouldn't it? And but everyone's got a different motive. And if the CEO doesn't even know your name, right. But because, you know, I typically worked for companies in either Boston or Silicon Valley. That was kind of my my space and the cultures were exact opposites. You know, in Boston, the it's like sport and if you read read the book about like hub spot, they called it graduation. Yeah, that's how sadistic they are about firing people and the constant conversation was who could who do we fire next? And it's like, well, you spend half your time hiring people. Can we work on actually improving people? And then silk and valley, it's all about you know, what kind of wine do you like? You know, we see the industry going and play much better on the east coast. Yeah, I mean it's certainly more peaceful and quality of life on the West Coast. But you know what happens when it doesn't work, because it's typically either it works or it doesn't. And right if the only thing that makes it work is revenue? Yeah, at the end of the day, depending on you know, culture is important and they're all other things are important to come together. But but what are WE IN BUSINESS FOR UNLESS WE'RE NONPROFIT? For we're nonprofit, maybe it's a mission and funding. But if we're a business, where a for profit business, it's revenue. I don't know what else. You know, what else are we maybe it's market share, you can you know, there's four or five things that a company objective may consist of. The end of the day, revenue is the measure. It's the measure. It's the measure for success. That's it. I was at a super early stage company back at during the boom of the ninety nine two's, like Rad it was right before the bust, round two thousand and the company raised fifty million dollars without a product, right if it because it was superstar CEOS and all the stuff,...

...and I thought I had it made. I was, you know, the first salesperson they hired. They hired ten immediately and and they it was all mbo based because they didn't have a product, so they were looking for pipeline and people just made it up. It was like. And then I got the first customer and they were yelling at me because I dedicated an engineer for a week for free to get the deal. And I go it's revenue. Now we have an actual paying customer. Isn't that crazy? And they oh, yeah, but he spent a week there. It was better than spending it in his basement. Yeah, you know, that's or, you know, hanging around me, you know, going out and given presentations that I could do on my own. But I think the point there is you got to understand the culture. And at the end of the day the company went out of business. Obviously surprised, you know. So fifty million was just wiped away and I had left there right after eleven because I got you know, this place is not going to go anywhere and on money motivate as I have to go find a real job. But you know, on the West Coast you get the Kumbaya speech about saving the world in the environment, but at the end of the day, the boarder directors in the VC's want money, they want shareholder equity. Yeah, and it it sails. You can't get commission on, you know, goodness and saving the world. Yeah, and I think that's perfect. I mean in terms of mistakes there I see reps make. That's one of them. Forgetting what this is about. Like it's very easy. I mean, I've been in and work with clients that have these amazing cultures. Right, there's there's Ping punk tables and video games and and there's free food and there's Yoga and gyms and and, you know, a Saunas and all of this stuff, and that's that's great, I get it. But that stuff isn't free, right. That culture that you want requires revene. I feel like I'm feel like I'm doing the Jack Nicholson thing from few good men. It's about revenue. It's all about revenue, and reps have a tendency, I think, sometimes, depending on that type of culture, to get caught up in not and forget that really. Oh well, I made my cast, so I did my activity level. Okay, what how much revenue you generate today? Well, none yet, but I'm close. Okay, you know the name of the game. Understanding, understand the profession you're in. It's awesome to help businesses solve problems. You're going to meet some amazing people and you're going to be you're going to form some incredible, long lasting relationships and that's the that's the spice of life. But the job of the thing that you have been hired to do is to capture the revenue for the company. I used to tell my my teams like, okay, look, arch was to go get the revenue. Why is our time? To go get the revenue so the company grows and so that...

...all of the other people in here can live nice lives, pay for their benefits, but two kids through school. We are the engine that makes that happen. So understand. Without that revenue, none of that, none of that's going to happen. The company's going to shrink, close its doors. Whatever our jobs are bringing the revenue and have no, no, don't kid yourself that it's about anything else. Yeah, but I've got a story about that because I worked at one of those companies and you know, they had the ping pong table, had a gym, beautiful gym in the building that was solely for the company and you know that had, you know, free food, all beautiful offices, all decorated and stuff, of course, with venture capitals, money, not revenue, right, and I was working there and the new guy started and he'd started taking advantage of all this stuff and I did none of it because I know what happens when you do, and I took them aside. I got that stuff, not for sales people, because what do you mean? It's for all the employees. I go, it is, but unless you're crushing your number, guess what they're going to tell you. Hey, what? Hey, enough massages, get on the phone, right, yeah, that treadmill. You know what? We could put that up to your desk so you can actually be doing calls while you're on this. And that's it. I think q one, which is naturally distracted. You know, and I've talked to several reps in the last couple weeks, because we get the hangover from q four, where it's like, all of a sudden, somebody turn the lights on at three am at a particular entertainment establishment. We're like, we look at our watch and we're like, isn't it thirty? We know we're on the day, like we gotta go home. Everyone was so friendly to us. They're so excited we were here and then, yeah, we got this hangover and we're like, Oh, oh, wait a second. You know, I'm going from fifteen percent to three percent. This doesn't feel fair. I had, you know, five states and now I've got one state and now I've got to share this person with three other people. I'm going to look for another job, and it's like just just chill. I think people get, you know that there's that five stages of grief, right, we've got to go through those five stages very quickly in January. Otherwise, you know, you'll be in February and March you won't have a new job because you're not psych to go look for you kind of mad at the company, but you quota hasn't gone down and nobody filled your pipeline for you. I think you just have to go through those stages very quickly, because I went through it every year. It's actually one of the pleasures of working for yourself is that you don't have that right. That is nice, right, that is very nice. I don't...

...have that way where wait, you just cut my territory in half and increase my number two acts. How does that work? Hold on a sec let me, I've got it. I need I need a moment. I need to put myself in time. Let me go for I don't have that, I know. You know, work for yourself. You're right, but it is. It's one of those things and if you're in sales long enough you need to know it's coming right. Well, no, have you ever met a rep that was one hundred percent satisfied with a new complant at the beginning of the year? Not a one, not a one. Never. So you're not going to. It's not Christmas. It's right Christmas. and has your complant ever been better, you know, unless you're in a dying company? Oh yeah, and that then, and it's not really better. It's just trying to match or handicap what's happening to the industry or the company's right, you know, you seen that happen all the time. But I remember one year whereas I at the kick Goff you know, I was the rep of the year. I got this big trophy. It was my goal, you know, and I'm looking at these people that are a lot older than me just given me these scarling looks of why I don't deserve it. And then like the next week and I was like on top of the world and, you know, going to club and everything, and then I got the comp plan and it was like, Oh wow, well, Brian, you made a lot of money last year, so we kind of put a couple people and your territory. And remember that guy you hired and trained as your sales engineer. He's really good. That can allow a lot of other people to have access to him. And and I'm like looking at this and I'm like Oh, and you know on you mope around and it, but that doesn't serve any purpose. No, it accomplishes nothing. You call all your head hunters and they're like, yeah, there's plenty of jobs out there. Then if you haven't time to you since last year, Nuary, and any recruiter who's worth his weight should be calling every good salesperson, without a doubt they should be. Yeah, they should be padding the phones, for sure. Yeah, bously, they're hungry audience. The problem is the company you're going to. You know, you starting from scratch. You're getting somebody's left over territory right, you know, because they're saying, okay, what are you willing to give up and yeah, yeah, Alaska, yeahs no, you can have that Hawaii to I'll give you Hawaii. I mean, I might like to go there, but I'm not going to generating our revenue from it. In the complaints if it's always kind of like Whackam Ale. It's like a game of Whackam Wall. You blow your number out and then the next year they try to put together a complant or restructure territories or resources so that they can keep you in this imaginary band that that a CFO somewhere thinks a sales rep should be in, not the one you were in last year, and then you got to pop up and pull it off again this year,...

...pop out of another hole in the trying to smack you down with the next complan. I was always infuriated me. It does, and I've you know, I've had a couple of managers that protected me, but that is the norm and I think you have to get used to it. It's part of the profession. You have to say, well, yeah, I'm still making as much as a surgeon, you know, with the education of a plumber for the plant. Totally still in that. Well, better more educated than me. Hey, I finished the bottom ten percent of my high school class. I always say, yeah, there's somebody on death row that did better than me, but so you you kind of got to work that and I think that's comes to my sales preneur idea that if your network and your social reach and your business acument is so good, you know you are going to be you know, Jerry McGuire will find you. They somebody who will put you in the right spot and you'll have lots of choices. If you're an order take or you've got to just take what you're given. Yeah, I mean the people that work at the ultra high performers. They I see them come into cut one aware of you know, this is what's going to happen. We know we're going to do the emotional grieving, you know thing, because they're going to mess with territories. We know that's going to happen, so they try to prepare themselves for that. What I what I the one mistake I have seen ultra high performers make, and not consistently, I see it occasionally, is that while they're super proactive at a sales kickoff about getting as much as they can out of it, there the people like you mentioned there in the front row engaging with you. I've seen them actually relax a little bit too much on their client interactions during that week and it creates this little blip that takes a couple weeks to recover. It's not catastrophic by any means, but they're they're doing the best. They kind of pull everything out of that sales kickoff and they relax their diligence with the customer communication. It at a time when that customer is also going through everything that happens at the beginning of a New Year and it's pretty critical to make sure you're a continued presence for those really big accounts. Right. That's the one thing I've seen to make so it's that barrier between get everything you can out of the sales kickoff, but don't forget that that means at night, instead of passing out on the Bar, it's probably better to be making some phone calls to your customers and sentence some emails. Right. I've seen them relaxes a little bit too much at times. Yeah, yea, because that that's a huge mistake. Is the overindulgence on on on two parts. One is what you said about you know, keeping the thing going with the customer, because this is the time where budgets are allocated for the year and if the company's doing...

...well, they may be increased by the end of the year, but the company's not doing as well, they may be reduced. The second is if you're out to three, four in the morning and not going to be in shape the next morning, and guess what, if a hundred people are out of kickoff, someone's going to show up with a cold and there's all this handshaking and, you know, bad physical contact, and so everyone's going to go home with a cold. Yeah, and there goes another week of your day or your month, and you just got to get your rest, you know, bring there or flu. Pretty well, that for your air wipes. I mean, I've never, I will speak for a voice of experience. I have never in my career figured out how to be out till three o'clock in the morning and in sure, and I've tried folks, I've tried your guys. Never figure how to do it and then be ready to rock and roll at seven am and maintain it all day. Like I can show up at seven am or at am for a meeting. It I'm good for a couple hours, but then it's I don't know, the world gets kind of fuzzy, everything goes a little bit gray. Everybody seems to mumble. Right, you've got to take care of yourself, and that's another mistake I think we see a lot of reps make and and it's one I'll be honest, I struggle with right I when I'm not on the road, I'm in the gym, I'm working out, I'm watching what I eat. When I'm on the road, it's like that Jim down there just does not cut it, or that I cannot. I cannot go downstairs right now and work out. I've got to do this out of the other and because I'm in a client side all day, I got to spend my nights catching over other customers. If you don't take care of yourself physically, watch which eat, work out, do some type of exercise, you're going to pay the price. You're going to pay the price because sales is a mentally and physically demanding profession. It is. Yeah, and like five years ago I really changed my diet. So I do like this green juice every morning, like the nature bullet. Well, the thing is how do you do that on the road? That's just it, though. Right at home it's awesome. You just throw all the Greens in, because I'm not. I mean, anybody see a picture of me, you'll know I'm not really a vegetable guy, but I get that's I'm a cookie guy. I get the vegetables, I get all my vegetables, all my fruits, right there and one drink. It's awesome. But on the road, I don't know. I don't know. If I could, know it would just take me more time to go to the grocer store, run down to the whole foods and travel with my lout your bullet. I just don't know that I can be that guy. No, no, no, no matter how hard, the best you can do is getting, you know, the premade, you know somewhat healthy. Juice is right, Star bugs or something. Yeah, but guess what, you're on the road. You know you totally out of swords, you know you're out of your routine. So you and you probably want some kind of emotional energy, physical energy. So you're going to eat sugar that you typically don't need, right, more caffeine than you typically take, and and then guess...

...what? At night what do you do? You drink more than you normally would drink. And I still remember one kickoff. This guy, you know, did backflips to get into sales. He wanted a sales job so bad. Okay, the first kickoff meeting he goes to as a sales rep, he stayed out all night. He walks in two hours late and and the VP of sales literally calls them out. He says out in the hall in front of everybody and reamed them. I got and that guy came in, you know, you know I had it. been crying a grown man. Well, well, you're hear a go right. It's not a game. So it's amazing why people think sales is a game, like Oh, I want to get into it, because you know that sales reps drive and look at this beautiful Mercedes or or all those cliches. Right, all those cliches are going to sales is a discipline and it is a demanding one, because a lot of the variable of your job are things that you have to be prepared to respond to. How's a customer going to react when the product Shit's the bad or the Demo craps out or, you know, invoice even invoicing like I've had. I've had to deal with iree customers because it didn't like the way they were invoiced, and that's all just to maintain the revenue stream. Right. It is it demanding for and it is a discipline. I think a lot of people forget that. It requires a level of professionalism. I know, folks, it sounds odd for me to use that word, but it requires. It requires a level of professionalism and commitment to the discipline in order to be successful and, quite frankly, out of respect for the other people that got their asses in the room at eight o'clock. Yeah, the other thing is is the whining. You know, you have all the right to feel that way, but expressing it to the other wraps and being common, becoming known as the winer or the the water cooler person. Cossi that that that is just because everyone starts to buy into it and you you see these people busy, all hang around together and, believe me, every manager sees that, knows it and you're on the short list if you if you are expressing that or becoming that wine or no matter how bad the product, the complan the territory, keep it to yourself, because your manager will respect you and will try and accommodate you if you're good. Right, you know that. The last thing when I was a manager, you know, an a player, I would do anything for you know, and it's often said. You know, you don't hire a players, you rent them, ha ha. Yes, right, because they can go anywhere. So they will get what they want. The order takers that the manager wants them to go. And, if you might, getting a terrible complant or terrible territory might be a little hint. So so, why did I get such a...

...crappy complaint? Where's the LASKA? How do I get there? So you know it the whining. You know, because you seen reps do this all the time. You know that they all the new complant or the the expense report scrutiny or, you know, the the arduous administrative activities. You know the way to handle it is cool off, be professional, talk to you manager one on one as a professional, express what is in your way and ask for their help. Yeah, it's always that. It's keep in mind you can disagree with your boss in private and publicly you have to, you should support them. Right, you don't want to be seen as the dissenter. I speak from the Voice of experience here. Folks not want to be seen as the one who questions in a public form. That was I learned that early and I learned the hard way in my career. I didn't understand that. I was young and dumb and you know the rest that saying, but I was. I didn't know that I shouldn't be doing it. I didn't have. I've been schooled in what was appropriate. That is a very important lessons. I had no problem if one of my reps wanted to come in and sit down and debate up and down about the complaint song, as it was an intelligent, well thought out to be I'm not, I don't, never, never have done whining. Real well, I had a thirty second rule. You come and you can wind for thirty seconds and then you better be talking about solutions. But when somebody would challenge me, or I've seen other executives to challenge you publicly, that creates a rift. That is that is counterproductive for everybody. Yeah, yeah, I've run into that a couple times on both sides. Oh Yeah, and yeah, I thincause it goes back to our lizard brain, right we're got a knee jerk reaction to a change that's announced and you're like what the hell, why are you doing that? That's not the way to do it. That even though these meetings may appear casual, you know, they may want it to be casual, it's still not right. And even when you're going out like a team dinner or something, and that's not the time to discuss a topic that could that could question your managers capability or capacity. My last one is, you know, if you're unhappy, don't be sitting on the fence. Make a decision. If this isn't the right place for you, move on, because January happens to be a big hiring season. Yeah, it. Don't get into a stalemate, you know. That's the classic stalemate is, okay, I'm not going to do what you want because you not doing what I want. That guess what? The manager always wins. Yeah, yeah, it's you know what, guys, it is. It's an unfortunate truth that manage always do and we talked about on another episode that we do. We talked about...

...getting involved with talking about the complant before January. So it's not a surprise. Right, get involved, talk to your manager have a sense for what it is. So if you know it's headed into direction that you're not going to be comfortable with, he make your decision and be proactive. January. Second, when everybody's back in, be ready to roll. Don't don't sit on the fence long enough that all of a sudden you've lost part of q one and then you've got to use the rest of it looking for a job and now you're part you've hurting the company you're with because you're not really being fair to them. You're not chasing doing your job, you're looking for your next job and it takes time and then you've got a whole year to rebuild your pipeline, depending on what the sales cycle is. So the earlier you make that decision it's the better for everybody. Yeah, because typically when you do start a new job, the first year typically isn't your best. No, you know, it's a pishit. The territory really isn't a cherry territory. You're not going to get the support because they don't even know if you're any good. So you typically have to spend three to six months just proven yourself and, let's face it, every manager's looking at non months to make a decision, right, and they typically make it six months, right, you know. So you know the classic. If you missed, you number two quarters in a row. We're out right. People typically don't talk about that other than in Boston kind of what's going on in their mind. Well, I mean it's and in the reality of it, right, it's the reality of the situation. They're very few organizations that I've seen that that give, I want to say, optimal length of time for a ramp up right, and it's always, in my experience, who was always a battle with the CFO, the CFO, because you know you can typically you're going to have some type of recoverable or unrecoverable drawling to keep them whole for a little bit and maybe it starts high the first quarter, ramps down as you expect them, you know, start to produce revenue. But it was always the CFO on why this person has been here six months, they haven't produced any revenue. You do realize our sales cycles eighteen months, right, yeah, but they haven't produce any revenue in six months. I'm going to give them three more. Okay. Again, you do realize our sales cycle is twelve months and it and we gave him the crappiest territory we had. So you know he are we seeing the behaviors? Are we seeing the activity? Are we seeing the quality of interactions that we want, that we believe will produce the return? It was always a battle with the CFO and it was the sales reps that have a tendency to pay the price for that. So, and that goes back to the episode we did on negotiating your complant like. That's just one of the that's just one of the things you got to know going in. The chances are somewhere around nine months, CEFO is going to get grouchy and your boss is going to run out of out of ways to defend continuing to keep you on board. So come out of the gate swinging. That's it. And I think that comes into a couple of things. If you are wrap that has a territory of you're given all the smart reps,...

...have those holdouts, you know, and then all of a sudden new rever comes in any deal that's real in that territories held out by the previous guy who doesn't have quote for it. Oh yeah, it's a bluebird guy. Hey, I'm going to keep this. Hey, new guy, sorry about that. Not Sorry. That's a hold out and I think we should do an episode on being at the new sales wrap and a new territory. Justify your existence until you have, you know, good revenue stream. Yeah, I think I would be a good one because I it's a challenge. I mean it's a challenge everybody in sales, especially like, like you said, make your decision. Don't be on the fence and, and know I mean anybody's been in sales couple of years and change jobs three years or change the job once. All you got to do change job once. Then you know what the rest of the rest of your careers could look like if you choose to make that jump. So, and it's I don't know, I'm a big respect to the company kind of guy. They're going to pay me. I feel like I should be, you know, doing my best to deliver what I've said I was going to deliver. So if I'm on the fence and I'm talking to recruiters and I'm looking for another job for too long, it just it doesn't sit right with me. So my advice is always make your decision and get involved. The complain know what you're going to do and play that year January one and again come out of the gate swinging and be focused and get it done. Stop bitching and just get it done. Well. So once again I'm showing my sensitive side there towards the end of that conversation. Brian. I apologize if I'm rubbing anybody the wrong way with the stuff. I just don't have much patience for people that aren't going to take, you know, accountability for their own success. That plus fact that, you know, as we talked about in another episode, I have had the flu from Hell. So I apologize. I'll blame it on the cold medicine. But for those of you that know me, you know I'm willing to help, I'm willing to support, I will bend over backwards being people successful, as long as they take responsibility for their own success as well. And so those that do that, those that can avoid these mistakes that we've talked about, that they can plan their you're out, can optimize their performance, can understand that sales is a discipline and it is a difficult one, they're the ones are going to be successful. They're the ones that are going to be the ultra high performers. They're the ones that we're going to have on the show and talk about how they've been successful over the past year, you know, towards the end of this year. So hope you guys enjoyed that conversation. Again, send us a note reddist review. Share this out. Really appreciate the promotion and until next time, we have value prime solutions. Wish you nothing but the greatest success. You've been listening to the BB revenue executive experience. To ensure that you never miss an episode, subscribe to the show and Itunes for your favorite podcast player. Thank you so much for listening. Until next time,.

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