The B2B Revenue Executive Experience
The B2B Revenue Executive Experience

Episode · 4 years ago

Barb Giamanco on Improving the Sales Experience

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Everyone is familiar with the phrase “customer experience.” But what about the experiences a customer has with a sale before signing on the dotted line?

We spoke with Barb Giamanco, author of The New Handshake: Sales Meets Social Media and one of the most recognized thought leaders in sales about what makes a good sales experience and how salespeople need to invest in themselves to find success.

You're listening to the BB revenue executiveexperience, a podcast dedicated to helping the executives train their sales and marketing teamsto optimize growth. Whether you're looking for techniques and strategies or tools and resources, you've come to the right place. Let's accelerate your growth in three,two, one. Welcome everyone to the B Tob Revenue Executive Experience. I'myour host, Chad Sanderson. Today we're going to be talking about sales experience, so to help us do that, we have with US Barbara of GIAMACO. Unless you've been living in a bell jar, you know who Barbara is, so I'm not going to try and murder her. Linkedin profile and accomplishments, she's definitely one of the most recognized sales thought leaders out there. I'ma big fan of her podcast as well. Barbara, I want to thank youfor taking time to be on the show today. Absolutely, Chad.Thank you so much, and you're welcome to call me barb. Okay,Barbar it is. So we like to start by asking guests kind of offthe wall question. If you weren't working with sales professionals today, what wouldyou be doing? What are you passionate about outside of sales. Well,that is easy because my side passion is I am an avid international traveler,foody, lover of wine and, as a matter of fact, I keepyou know, I run a blog in a site called a traveling food ECOM. That is my side passion and I'm always is, you know, outchecking out the latest and greatest and good food anywhere in the US or internationallyand writing about it. So my next act, Chad, quite honestly,is that's going to be my main business. Oh Nice. So there's a transitionplan, there is a plan. I'd really love to do that fulltime. It's it's just such a joy for me to be able to wehad a big show here in Atlanta about a month ago and all these chefswere in and all these people who provide equipment to restaurants whatever, and itwas so cool because I do have a company name registered called black and Tanmedia, and so that's how I registered for the for the conference, andit was so cool. You know, you walk up to the booth Iwas like, Oh, could I interview you? You know, I wasdoing a little mini podcasts and interviewing them to get, you know, blogposts and I just absolutely love it, and so that is going to bethe next thing. I can take everything I know and love about sales andsocial media and apply that to building this this other business. Excellent. Sowas there a favorite place that you've traveled to that you that just seems tostand above all the rest? Well, I love them all, and probablythe one that really stands out currently is last year in May, following speakingat the top sales world event and then spending time in London, my goodfriend Joanne Black and I went off to St Petersburg, Russia, for fivedays and that was off the hook most. I mean one of the most beautifulcities I think I've ever seen, and I'm a lover of art andarchitecture and all of that, and so it's fantastic. Now next May I'vebeen invited to speak at the Harvard Business...

Review Conference in Warsaw poleand so thatcould be the next big one. It's hard to say. Yeah, there'sso many places, so many places, so many amazing cultures, so manythings to sample out there. I always feel bad for those that don't thatdon't take the time to do that, to expand their horizons, so toSpeaker don't understand the joys of that. HMM. Well, honestly, I'vesaid for years that I really think it should be a requirement that every individualin the United States should travel internationally at least once. You know, itopens your eyes to different cultures and perspectives. And now I think it's easy toget kind of insulated in our own little world. And you know,funny story growing up this little tell people a little bit about how long I'vebeen walking this earth. You know, my choices were pointed out to me. Bar What are you gonna do? You know, your options are getmarried, be a teacher, be a nurse or be a steward us,as we called at that point's first, now they're now they're flight attendant,and I said, hmm, I'm thinking there are more choices available to me, but if I got to go with those four, I'm going with theflight attendant because that means I can travel the world. Yeah, it's awesome, it's amazing. I Love I love international travel. Love doing international businessas well. But today we want to talk about sales experience, and solet's you and I were talking before we record. It's a passion for bothof us. I would love just to get your kind of high level viewon when we say sales experience for our audience, what does that mean toyou? How do you provide the context for that? Sure? Well,I think, Chad, everybody's familiar with this concept of customer experience and Ithink that when you say customer experience, it almost suggests that great experiences startafter somebody signs on the dotted line. Okay, and I am a believerthat a great experience starts at the what Google Calls Zemap, the zero momentof truth, that first interaction with someone. It could be in person, itcould be email, it could be a phone call and quite honestly,I know we're going to get into this in a little bit more, Idon't think that sales reps and their managers are thinking about that in more depththan thinking about what is the quality that that experience from the first interaction allthe way through the entire sales process and beyond. So that's that's what Imean by sales experience. First Time you interact, is a positive or negativethat? It's positive, awesome. Can you move it to the next leveland how do you keep providing you know, a great experience. If you do, Dad, then your competitors don't stand a chance. Well, it'san interesting concert written. I mean I've been in sales for fifteen years beforethat, thirteen years in marketing, and it's you know, when you lookat the concept of experience, it requires, I think, a little bit moreof a macro view of intent, like I need to take more ownershipas a wrap or as a manager and crafting and coaching my refs on theimpressions that they're making, the waves that...

...they're creating out there and how thosewaves were that first contact. May come into touch with someone but they strugglewith it because they're so focused on my number. So is there? Haveyou come across any way to help sales reft for sales managers or even crowsor VP's really kind of broaden their thinking around that? Well, the firstthing is that people familiar with me, if they've ever listened to interviews orheard me speak or seeing things that I write, I'm very vocal chat aboutthe fact that I think that it's too easy for sales leaders to default tomeasuring activity like KPI of x number of emails sent per day, x numberof phone calls made and then when the going gets tough, the natural reactionis to insist on doing more. But I believe more of the wrong activityis not going to lead to the right sales result. And in fact agreat book on this topic is is from Jeff Kosher and his Co author calledselling to zebras, and I think you've had jeff on your show, ifI were call. All right. And so the concept of focusing in onthe right opportunities and then focusing on the right kind of quality activity. Itdoesn't mean you can't measure quantity, but at the end of the day,isn't that activity supposed to lead to a sales outcome, ie. A salesmeeting? You mean our jobs that move it down the field and across thered zone into the yeah, yeah, it's pretty much a lot of salesreps when I talk to them about experience our bring up that concept and Iuse the word frictionless a lot, just because I spent the last ten yearsdoing those types of services for BTC companies. I use the word friction less andthey and they kind of glaze over at first and when I say look, you need to be you need to be working on controlling that first impressionthrough value realization, and that means how did your company invoice? How didyou I mean every step of that experience is critical and I see so manyreps so focused on, okay, I got to get this deal, we'regoing to make this phone call, and there seems to be tunnel vision almostthere's lack of awareness. Well, there's that, and again I come backto a lot of this rest on sales leadership. I mean, let's befair to the sales folks. If you're an individual sales contributor in your manageris harping on you about did you send next number of emails and make xnumber of phone calls, you know, obviously you're going to do whatever yougot to do to check the box. Now the other thing I think isit's probably a lack of training. is part of it, and so Iwould say to any of the individual sales contributors listening in, don't wait foryour company to give you training. I don't know about you, Chad,but I've spent thousands throughout my career investing in my own success. So don'twait for somebody else. And then the other thing that I would say isyou know, stand up and have a little bit of courage. It's gotto be very defeating to feel like your your churn and all this activity butpeople are ignoring you and you're not getting them to respond back to you.That would suggest taking a step back and...

...doing things a little bit differently,and I can actually give a very specific example, which I actually wrote abouton Linkedin. I even included the template that I used Chad to get thesecheap marketing officers to be willing to agree to a conversation with me. Outof the twenty seven, I only knew three personally and I got a hugeresponse back. But the main reason that happened because I made the whole outreachabout something I could give to them first that would be valuable for them,that would lead to something down the road. I think what cuts lost is thefirst touch of starting the relationships, not closing the deal people. Well, it's funny the concept of Servant Leadership, and you know I mean I wewere talking about James Carberry and he's very passionate about the same thing asI m. there's a reason that you want to form a relationship where you'renot asking for something first, right. It just sets people back. Itsets people back. So if you can provide value in the interaction, especiallyin the sales situation, you've done your homework, you understand, or haveattempted to understand, what it is, it might make that person take whatchallenge is that they're having and you don't go right at them and say hey, I got this cool widget. Do you want it? Right? That'sjust not the goal. And any relationship, regardless of whether it's sales or personal, you have to be aware of, you know, the give and takeof that, and I think the easiest way to do that, asyou said, is to provide them something that's going to provide them value outof the gate. That sets the stage where I think a nice parody ofthe relationship. The trick then becomes carrying it all the way through your interactionsin the sales process. HMM. That's a very, very good point,because if you if you do the right thing and you get the sales meeting, but you go into the sales meeting with the same boring dog and ponyfeature dump you know, then now now you've kind of set yourself back,you probably are not going to get a chance to move forward and this isvery common in technology companies. I worked in technology companies and you know,everybody's enamored by their unique piece of technology and that's fantastic, but you've gotto understand the the business. And in fact I'm super excited my friend debCalvert has teamed up with with two other authors of a new book that's comingout in the in the spring, and it's all the title is stop sellingand start leading, you know, the whole and it's it has backed witha lot of very rich buyer research. Buyers have said through survey. Youknow, here's what we want. We'll talk to salespeople who embody these kindsof traits and characteristics, but we don't want to talk to the people whojust come at us with a pitch. So I recognize that a lot ofindividual contributors, again coming back to training, maybe aren't. Maybe they're being trainedon the pitch and you can't blame the employer, though. You know, it's up to you to drive your own success, I believe. Sofigure out for yourself. There's lots of...

...great I mean we're talking about itright now. And if if you care about your success, if you careabout achieving quota you can step back and not only do things a little bitdifferently, but guess what, you will then stand up as a leader inyour own organization. People are going to then look at you and say,who barb, what are you doing? Your you know your these people areall responding to you. They're they're saying yes to meetings. What are youdoing differently? Being accountable. I'm being here right the accountability and the Isee it a lot and when I was running teams I said a lots likelook, the organization can only do so much because they've got, you know, competing priorities. I think everybody, not just in sales, think everybody, if they're serious about their career, should take that responsibility to continually.You know, we should call it feeding your head. Feed your head,get yourself trained, get yourself exposed to new concepts and don't just expect,you know, something to be handed to you. I don't know. Haveyou come across anyway, and I'm just slightly off topic, but have youcome across any way to inspire that effectively inside of sales reps? They allseem to nod and Oh yeah, yeah, but then I very rarely see them. You know, take the actions. Why? Gary Vaner Chuck says hegives all his stuff away for free because he knows nobody's going to takethe time to implement it. HMM. Well, you know, I callthe concept learn to earn, and I think you know, initially people mayshake their head, but you know, at a certain moment in time you'reeither going to be so defeated that you say, you know, sales socksand I'm getting out of the profession right or you're going to say you're goingto churn out of jobs and then one day you're going to wake up andsay, yeah, maybe I am accountable. And so some of that may justhave to happen through some people's life experiences where you know they're expecting somebodyelse to do for them. But I, you know, after having a longcareer in selling currently today, you know, I just know that ifyou're going to be in it for the long term, it's your job tomake sure that you're staying fresh and relevant and on top of what's current andwhat's coming and you know, and by the way, doing those things happensto be the exact kind of thing that that buyers are looking for from sellers. Do you understand their business? Do you understand what's happening in their competitiveworld? What about their industry? What trends do you see in technology thatmight be interesting to them? I mean, let's face it, these buyers arebusy their heads down in their own organizations doing their work. They maybedon't have as much time to be outside the company looking at what's happening froma broader point of view, if you're the consultative, problem solving salesperson whocomes to them with fresh insights and ideas, backed by some smart thinking and demonstratea little bit of homework, which, by the way, I didn't havethe Internet when I started in sales. I don't know about you, Chad, it did. There is there's no excuse for not being able togo out there, gather some data, put your thinking cap on and thinkabout all right, v piece of sales or faced with these five challenges,how could I bring them something different to...

...think about? It could be yourwhite paper, but don't bring that if it's a sales pitch. You knowforget that. It could be an ink article. Maybe it's a survey youpicked up on. There's all kinds of ways to do these sorts of things. But I think the trap that a lot of sales people are falling into, and again partially leadership's fault, is they just come in and they think, if I just keep churning these activities, something is bound to happen. Yeah, something's bound to happen. All right, you'll probably just wash outof the job. Well, it's to me because I didn't have the Ididn't have the Internet when I started, so the research process took a littlebit more time and effort. So to me, having the Internet like giveme ten fifteen minutes and and especially as a public company, I can gothrough K analyze your financials, I can look at the trends. I meansends ten minutes. And then when I talked to a lot of reps today, the first thing I hear I in fact, I just had a conversationwith somebody two days ago. Like I'm doing all of these things, I'mdoing all things about I can't connect with my customer. Well, what doyou know about your customer? What do you mean? What do I knowabout my cous will? Did you do? Any reason why? I don't havetime for that. Okay, are you hitting quota? Because you're nothitting quote. I know you're not hitting quota. So take the time.Everybody, a lot of the sales ups want to walk in, they wantto talk about themselves because it's comfortable, because they feel more comfortable in thatspace. But that experience that you are creating, that impression that you're creating, it's about making the buyer understand that you're really trying to understand where they'recoming from, what they're facing, and it shows up through the entire salesprocess. When we were talking about email, before we hit recording. That's justone thing. And I see so many spelling airs, and maybe it'sbecause I was an English undergraund drives me absolutely insane. But if you senda crappy email, you should expect a crappy response and that's going to colorthe entire sales experience. HMM. And you should expect no response. And, by the way, this practice lately that some people are getting into.Hey barbed so and so from blah, blah, blah. Did you seemy last three emails? Yeah, and I'm ignoring this one. Just letyou know, Imanie. It's like that's all you got. Did you seemy last email? Will all three of them were a pitch. They wereall about you. You, you obviously know absolutely nothing about me or whoI am, or you know whatever, and people can go read the thelink to the prior to the one I just did this week, the tolinkedin posts. I took an email from somebody, I took their name outof it and I've saved these emails. I know you do too, andI've put ebooks together giving people compare and contrast. But in this post Ishare the email and then kind of break it down for people what's wrong.Hopefully, if they read it, you can sort of see that for themselves. If not, I give them a little help. And then the secondfollow on post just talks about how to do it better and and I evenincluded a template that people could, you know, consider using, an approachthey could consider using. I think this is where is important to talk abouttechnology. Automation can only take you so far and there is nothing wrong withcreating templates. I do it too,...

...but it does still require you tothink about okay, if I'm targeting this specific industry, let's say it's,you know, Sass, companies of a certain size or whatever, what aresome of the main challenges they're they're potentially facing? What are some trends thatyou're seeing in the industry? What do you know about their competitors? Again, that's not hard to figure out. You can craft two three sentences.You might push them again to a white paper invite them to have a conversationwith you about it. What are they seeing instead? Most of these emails. Hi, I'm Bar GMACO, is social centered selling. Let me tellyou all about our stuff. Well, by the way, Click this link, go watch a video and here's a link to my schedule and you canschedule a sales call with me. YEA, no, not then. No,nobody is going to. That's why nobody is responding to you, andI think listen, I'm as opinionated as I ever am. I try tobe as respectful as I can and with all due respect sales folks, sayingyou don't have time to better represent yourself as a consultative seller, that's justbeing lazy, without a doubt, and it almost to me seems like ifthey're not willing to do that, maybe they should be looking at a differentcareer. They probably ought to be considering it. I mean, think abouthow many people freaked out a year, year and a half ago when forstercame out with the big prediction by two thousand and twenty, you know,a million sales jobs will be gone. People focus a lot on that,but they often don't focus on the other part of the researching that same report, where they say and five hundred thousand of those positions will be replaced bythe people who do demonstrate they've got business acumen and they can bring real valueto the table in terms of helping buyers think differently and solve problems differently.It's the order takers, the people who do the feature dumps, those theyou know, and by the way, when everybody gets freaked out about artificialintelligence, which I did a great segment Webin ar yester at thought was great. I had a great guest on our bright talk sales experts channel is aboutAI and how that that can help sales people in and sales leaders measure whatmatters. But you know, people are getting freaked out about artificial intelligence.If you're going to stay in your little box where you're just pitching features anddoing demos, yes, that can be replaced with artificial intelligence and technology andthat's common pretty fast. But people, especially in complex be to be sellingsituations. They they still need the people, the personal interaction, and so juststop waiting. I mean we're two years off, right. I meanbuyers already want a different kind of sales person now. So what are youwaiting for? And the head it's not like it's it's not like it justshowed up overnight either. I mean maybe...

...you know, I got my age, but if I feel like, since I've been in sales, those peoplethat understood you were selling to people first and foremost, absolutely, and yougot to build the trust. You have to you have to establish a credibilityand talking about you all the time. Yeah, everybody's been to a partywhere there's that guy who's talking about themselves that everybody can't wait to get awayfrom. I'm sure they would have been to those parties. So what youknow, take the take the moment, take a deep breath, try andunderstand what the person you're you're sitting across when we're trying to get in touchwith is experiencing so you can connect to that. HMM, you know,they're not looking to buy the drill, they're looking to buy the hole inthe wall. Right yeah, the hang the picture and all you guys won'ttalk about as the drill. And I'm not listening to it. I don'tknow about I've had other stuff to do. Nobody's listening to that. And andand there again. That's where, you know, training can be helpful. I mean, a couple of years ago, on a Sunday afternoon,don't ask me why, I just had got my I created something called randomrants in sales and social selling, just this quick little presentation. I wasjust tired of certain things that. Unfortunately, some of that hasn't changed, butone of the rants was, you know, lose the corporate history.Nobody cares about that. You know, why do you? Why do youwant to start a sales presentation taking people through, you know, twelve slidesabout how awesome your company is? Nobody cares at that point. Nobody careswhen you have a limited opportunity to set yourself apart from all the other competitors. If you don't want to look like a commodity, you have to doit differently and you just have to realize that that story can come out later. You've got to grab somebody. I mean think about yourself as as abuyer. You know, I don't know about you, Chad, but whenI get the calls or I you know, I get the emails or my favorites, or when I get something like a situation happened about two months ago. I had downloaded this white paper. Is Interested in this technology. Ithought it could do something for the business. Got The you know, email andthe call from the REP and I agreed to spend twenty minutes talking tothis person because I really was interested in the technology. I literally the firstten this guy didn't shut up. We said hello. Ten minutes in he'sstill talking about himself, the product, this and finally I said, youknow, you need to stop talking. I said listen, you haven't askedme one single question about why I was willing to give you time. WhatI was interested in related to your technology. You know, you asked nothing aboutmy business. You just said hello and you started pitching me straight outof the gate. I said, so we're probably not going to be doingbusiness together, and just know that. You know I'm in sales as aprofession and I've been in it for a long time. Run big teams,incorporate. You really want to think about adjusting your approach. If you getsomebody to say Yes to twenty minutes,...

...don't waste it yaking about yourself.You need to find out why they're willing to talk to you. Why?Think it was research that, I think it was gone dot ioe put outthat you could tell how successful the sales call was. They had all theanalytics that would show you if the sales rep talked more than, I thinkit was forty three percent of the time during the initial call, the opportunityto win it, that the percentages is went through the floor and that twentyminutes you really want them talking. You don't. You don't want to betalking about yourself. That you can do that later. Just asking sense.But it's amazing how many, how many reps don't then even that crap thing. I think there's an art form and a bit of a science to craftingthose questions. It's part of what you know as part of what we teachand work with people on. But there's this seems to be this reluctance todoing that because they don't feel as in control of the conversation. So theyget they go right to where they're comfortable. I'm going to talk for ten minutesof this and hopefully I say something you give a crap about well,and that's we're investing in learning and doing your homework and broadening your, youknow, horizons in terms of better understanding your own industry and competitive challenges andtrends. All of that can help you get off the script. And youknow Jet Blunt's latest book on Sales Eq. You know JEB talks about it.It's a trigger. So what happened with this rap? I knew exactlywhat happened. Oh my gosh, somebody said Yes to a phone call withme. Who I got twenty minutes. I better pack it all in therewell. And what I've always said to people chat. If, if someonegrants me thirty minutes of their time, you can bet the twenty five minutesof that time is me talking with them about them, you know, talkingwith them about kind of some homework that I've done and some things that lookto it, and asking the right kinds of questions. Listen, it's nothard to put your thinking cap on and ask some decent questions which do notinclude what keeps you up at night and that sort of thing. And youknow, when people will say to me will barb, if they ask meto tell them about our business, shouldn't I do that? I said no, redirect. You know, when Pete, if someone says to me early onin a sales call, Chad, well, barb, tell us alittle bit about your services and kind of the pricing, I say, youknow what, I don't think we know enough about I don't know enough aboutwhat you're trying to accomplish yet. So I feel like that's a little premature. I have a few things I'd like to validate, a few questions I'dlike to ask you. With that be okay? Could we talk about thatfirst? And they're like Oh, okay, and you know, and then westart talking about their business and I start asking them questions. And thenwhen you hear things like wow, that's a really quick, great question.Nobody's ever asked us that, I think to myself, that's a sales basic. But Hey, and their mind. I now am at a whole differentlevel than somebody else right and so I think it's important for people to resistthe urge. You'll get your chance.

Find out what the buyer cares aboutfirst and build from there. Yeah, I'm without I mean without doing that. You cut off all the possibilities, cut off the possibilities where you couldgo and you you instantly get put into that box of your just like everyother salesperson that's come through here. You have no ability to differentiate. You'rejust another just another pitch man. I can totally see how those jobs are, you know, on the chopping block and going to be impacted by AI. But the the sales reps that really take the time understand people, understandthe business and do their homework and know how to have a conversation that Ithink has to be really based on true curiosity like that. I don't knowif you've seen it, but for me, the sales reps that I have seenbe the most effective are the ones that are genuinely curious about what's goingon in the business and what problems are having so they can have a dialogabout solving those problems. MMM, and I'm really glad you said that,because I think this is a good place to say that those are the samepeople and I'm going to put myself in that camp, Chad. These arethe same people who genuinely care about doing no harm and other words, theywant to do right by the people in the organization. I don't know thatenough reps really stop to think about the fact that sometimes people are putting theircareers on the line with these buying decisions and you know, the last thingyou want to do is make promises that can't be kept. The last thingyou want to do is sell something that's going to make problems worse makes themlook bad. I think it's not just the curiosity as people who genuinely intheir heart care to do the right thing. And sometimes doing the right thing meanswalking away, means being honest and saying we are not going to bein a position to help you solve this problem, and I want to connectyou with a couple other companies because I think they can help you now.I when I first did this years ago, my boss was standing behind me listeningin on a call and after I got off the phone, all myGosh, did he rip me a new one? He's like, barb,what are you doing? Why are you telling that customer? And I said, becaused him. We actually don't have a product that's going to help solvethe problem. This is what they're faced with and I'm not going to sellhim something. I said what do you want me to do? Sell somethingknowing it's not only going to tick them off because it's not going to work, it's going to be a return for us that's going to look bad onme. You, the department. I said I'm not going to go there. Doing the right thing was recommending him to talk to these two other people. You probably knew where I'm going with the story, because that gentleman cameback and ended up buying many hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of other technologysolutions, both hardware and software. Why? Because he never forgot that I waswilling to say, Hey, we're...

...not able to help you here.Some people, I think, who can, and I think that's I think todaymore than ever, that is super important. You've got to balance shortterm and long term and if you're just trying to get a short term Skalesale and you're not thinking about the impact that could potentially make if it doesn'tgo right, that's a problem. Well, I've still see it today a companythat I will not name. I was looking at technology for our businessand I, you know, I filled out the form on the website likehey, I want to have a demo. I'm willing to give you some ofmy time, and the first email I got, I mean literally secondslater, was hey, we only work with companies that are this size andI don't know if that's you or not, which irritated me first and foremost.You could have looked and would not have taken a much time to figurethat out. Right. Well, I don't know if I really should scheduletime with you or not, and I'm just kind of lit me up sobad that I quickly ensured that we were not going to be doing business andwent directly to their competitor, who said, not a problem, let's talk.Yeah, YOU'RE A little bit smaller than we normally would work with.What we let's talk see if we can solve the problem that well, andyou know, right and and frankly, that sells person's arrogance and rudeness.You're not going to forget that. And while you're not going to say ithere on the Podcast, I imagine privately you probably let some people know andyou know that that should be and that should be an immediate signal to themarketing department, because we live in a world where, if you're going tofill out a form, it is very easy to include. What is thesize of Your Business? Right, right, and if you don't fit the typicalsize, then a very nice, professional response would be. You know, we don't have enough experience supporting companies of your size. Here's some companieswe think could help you. Right there there are. There are a lotof other ways you could have gone, but I'm sorry, insulting a buyer. That's not a good sales tactic people. Oh not at all. I meanit goes back to that experience and honestly, it created a granted,I'm hyper aware of it because I am so passionate about I pay attention tothat stuff, but it created in me reluctance to even really be willing toeven think about them anymore as a potential provider, not only for me,but when I'm asked by other, you know, other organizations, what technologieswould you recommend? I'm not that's not coming up on the list because Iwouldn't want to the experience that I create and provide. I don't want tomake a recommendation to a you know, it's a potential prospect or a customer, to a technology solution where their sales teams are not professional. I hadto catch myself there, but you know what I mean. Yeah, Iwell, of course I do. And you know, and there again,when you think about experience, it's it's like it's like, you know,skipping a rock on a pond right the it's going to have this ripple effectand that ripple effect can be a negative one. That impacts you as asales are contributor personally, can make your...

...company look bad. You know,now it's expanding further. Nobody's going to recommend you. We have something calledsocial media and social networks. We can actually tell people not to buy fromyou or even talk to you. We can tell them the experience is reallypoor. And here's why. Because in that situation with that company, ifthey're very clear that they don't support a smaller size business, then it's theirresponsibility to make that clear on their website. Right, you know, coming backand to somebody who's expressed interest and then thinking it's okay to be rude. I just don't think that end of Itll just going to last very longin sales. But Hey, that's just me. This is this has beenan amazing conversation. As we get the I want to be respectful of time. But as we get to the end, if you were to tell sales professionalsone thing that you think would be a great starting point for them toconsider their sales experience, what would that be and why? I think itcomes down to taking responsibility for your own success, Chad, which we've talkedabout. Don't wait for somebody else to help. Give you the training andthe skills and the guidance you need to respond to what buyers say they wantfrom salespeople. They will talk to us. It's your job, though, tomake it clear how you're different from everybody else who just pitches. Youlook like a commodity. So that's my biggest piece of advice. Want toyoutube videos, follow people like you and me, listen to podcast you know, get out there and and ask questions and take it on yourself to driveyour own personal sales success, because at the end of the day, nobodyelse is going to do it for you. My mom used to say nobody's goingto make you happy but you, and you're responsible for that. Buildthat, build that, and mom is a wise woman. Yeah, Huh, yes, it was it. I'm sure you know what. She's asaint, because I know when I was a child. That did not didnot make it easy, but she's definitely insane. So thank you, barb, for this. This has been great. If people are in interested in talkingto easiest way, I mean you're out there and all the social mediaplatforms, but easiest way to connect with you. What would that be?Oh, well, listen. You can connect with me on Linkedin. Youcan find me on twitter at Barbara GIEAMONCO. Read the blog. Hey, it'sokay to call me too. I'm here in Atlanta, Atlanta, Georgianin the US. Plus one four zero, four six, four seven, fournine, two five. I think phone is great technology. Anybody's gotquestions or interested in a little bit of mentoring and help, just give mea call. Love to talk to you. Excellent. Thank you again very muchfor the time and has been an absolute pleasure having you on the show. Well, thank you so much for the invitation chat. I really appreciateit. All right, everyone that does it for this episode. Please checkus out at be to be REV exaccom show the episode of friends, families, Co workers. If you like what you here, leave us a reviewon itunes. We do look at that to determine what type of guests tobring on so you will continue listening and find value in what we're doing.Until next time. We have value prime solutions. Wish you all nothing butthe greatest success. You've been listening to...

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