The B2B Revenue Executive Experience
The B2B Revenue Executive Experience

Episode · 3 years ago

Barb Giamanco on Improving the Sales Experience

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Everyone is familiar with the phrase “customer experience.” But what about the experiences a customer has with a sale before signing on the dotted line?

We spoke with Barb Giamanco, author of The New Handshake: Sales Meets Social Media and one of the most recognized thought leaders in sales about what makes a good sales experience and how salespeople need to invest in themselves to find success.

Youre listening to the BTB revenueexecutive experience, a podcast dedicated ELP at executives, traintheir sales and marketing teams to optimize growth, whether you're lookingfor techniques and strategies were tools and resources. You've come to theright place. Let's accelerate your growth in three to one: welcomeeveryone to the B to be revenue executive experience. I'm your hostChad Sanderson! Today we're going to be talking about sales experience and tohelp us do that. We have with US Barbara Gomonco unless you've beenliving in a BELJAR. You know who Barbara is so. I am not going to tryand murder her linked in profile and accomplishments. She's. Definitely oneof the most recognized sales thought leaders out there. I'm a big fan of herpodcast as well. Babara want to thank you for taking time to be on the showtoday absolutely chat. Thank you. So much and you're welcome to call me barb.Okay, Barbaat is so we like to start by Askar. I guess kind of off the walkquestion if you weren't working with sales professionals today, what wouldyou be doing? What are you passionate about outside of sales? Well, that iseasy, because my side passion is, I am an avid international, traveler foodylover of wine and, as matter of fact, I keep you know, I run a blog in a sitecalled a traveling foodycom. That is my side passion and I'm always you knowout, checking out the latest and greatest and good food anywhere in theUS or internationally and writing about it. So my next act. Chad, quite honestly, isthat's going to be my main business, Oh nice, so there's a trasition plan.There is a plan I' really love to do that full time. It's it's just such ajoy for me to be able to. We had a big show here in Atlanta about a month agoand all these chefs were in and all these people who provide equipment torestaurants whatever and it was so cool because I do have a a company nameregistered called black and Tan media, and so that's how I registered for thefor the conference and it was so cool. You know you walk up to the Booth DIwas like Oh, could I interview you, you know was doing little mini podcastand interviewing them to get. You know, block post and I just absolutely loveit, and so that is going to be the next thing. I can take everything I know andlove about sales and social media and apply that to building this this otherbusiness excellently. So is there a favorite place that you've traveled tothat you? That just seems to stand above all the rest. Well, I love themall, and probably the one that really stands out currently is last year inMay, following speaking at the top sales world event and then spendingtime in London, my good friend Jewanne black and I went off to St PetersburgRussia for five days, and that was off the hook nos I mean one of the mostbeautiful cities. I think I've ever seen and I'm a lover of art andarchitecture and all of that, and so it's fantastic now. Next May I've beeninvited to speak at the Harvard...

Business Review Conference and WarsawPoland, so that could be the next big one, it's hard to say, yeah, there's so many places so manyplaces so many amazing cultures, so many things to sample out there. Ialways feel bad for those that don't that don't take the time to do that, toexpand their horizon so to speak. Er, don't understand the joys of that M. Well, honestly, I've said for yearsthat I really think it should be a requirement that every individual inthe United States should travel internationally, at least once you knowit opens your eyes to different cultures and perspectives, and now Ithink it's easy to get kind of insulated in our own little world and you know funny story growing up. Thiswill tell people a little bit about how long I've been walking this earth. You know my choices were pointed out tome bar. What are you going to do? You know your options? Are Gett married, bea teacher, be a nurse or be a stewardess ays. We called it at thatpoint, O courst now they're now theyr flight antenant, and I said Hmm, I'mthinking there are more choices available to me. But if I got to gowith this for I'm going with the flight attendant because that means I cantravel the world yeah, it's awesome, it's amaze. I love. I LoveInternational Chiud love doing international business as well, buttoday we want to talk about sales experience and so a you- and I weretalking before we Hav record it's a passion for both of us. I would lovejust to get your kind of high level view on when we say sales experiencefor our audience. What does that mean to you? How do you provide the contextfor that sure? Well, I think chat everybody'sfamiliar with this concept of customer experience and I think that when yousay customer experience, it almost suggests that great experiences startafter somebody signs on the dotted line. Okay and I'm a believer that a greatexperience starts at the what Google Calls Zema the zero momentof truth, that first ineur action with someone I could be in person. It couldbe email, it could be a phone call and, quite honestly, I know we're going toget into this and a little bit more. I don't think that sales rups and theirmanagers are thinking about that in more depth and thinking about what isthe quality t that experience from the first interaction all the way throughthe entire sales process and beyond. So that's that's what I mean by salesexperience. First Time you interact is a positive or negative that it'spositive awesome. Can you move it to the next level and how do you keepproviding? You know a great experience. If you do that, then your competitorsdon't stand a chance. Well, it's an interesting conce written I' Min I'vbeen in sales for fifteen years before that thirteenyears in marketing- and it's you know when you look at the concept ofexperience it requires, I think, a little bit more of a macro view ofintent like I need to take more ownership as a rap or as a manager, IndCrafting and coaching my ripts on the...

...impressions that they're making thewaves that they're creating out there and how those waves were that firstcontact may come into touch with someone, but they struggle with itbecause they're so focused on my number. So is there, have you come across anyway to help sales, restore sales managers or even crros or VPS, reallykind of broaden their thinking around that? Well, the first thing is thatpeople familiar with me if they've ever listened to interviews or heard mespeak or seeing things that I write. I'm very vocal chat about the fact thatI think that it's too easy for sales leaders to default to measuringactivity like KPI of x, number of emails sent per day X, number of phonecalls made and then, when the going gets, tough, the natural reaction is toinsist on doing more, but I believe more of the wrong activity is not goingto lead to the right sales result and in fact a great book on this topic isis from Jeff Koser and his Co author called selling Dezebras and I thinkyou've had jeff on your show. If I would call all right and so the conceptof focusing in on the right opportunities and then focusing on theright kind of quality activity, it doesn't mean you can't measure quantity,but at the end of the day, isn't that activity supposed to lead to salesoutcome. I es sales meeting, you mean our jobs, Tha, move it downthe field and across the red zone into the YEAHTEL. I pretty much a lot ofsales reps. when I talk to them about experience, I bring up that concept andI use the word frictionless lot just because I spent the last ten yearsdoing those types of services for BDC companies. I use the word friction listand they and they kind of glaze over at first, and when I say look you need tobe, you need to be working on controlling that first impressionthrough value realization, and that means how does your company envoice?How does you I mean every step of that experience is critical and I see somany Repso focused on okay. I got to get this deal whe're going to make thisphone call and there seems to be tunnel vision. Almost there there's lack ofawareness. Well, there's that and again I come back to a lot of this Restan sales leadership.I mean, let's be fair to the sales folks, if you're an individual salescontributor and your manager is harping on you about, did you senx number ofemails and make x number of phone calls? You know obviously you're going to dowhatever you got to do to check the box now. The other thing, I think, is it'sprobably: A lack of training is part of it, and so I would say to any of theindividual sales contributors listening in. Don't wait for your company to giveyou training. I don't know about you chat, but I've spent thousandsthroughout my career, investing in my own success. So don't wait for somebodyelse and then the other thing that I would say is you know, stand up andhave a little bit of courage. It's got to be very defeating to feel like youryoure churning all this activity, but people are ignoring you and you're, notgetting them to respond back to you, and that would suggest taking a stepback and doing things a little bit...

...differently, and I can actually give avery specific example which I actually wrote about on Linkdon. I eten includedthe template that I used Chad to get these chief marketing officers to bewilling to agree to a conversation with me out of the twenty seven. I only knewthree personally and I got a huge response back, but the main reason thathappened, because I made the whole outreach about something I could giveto them. First, that would be valuable for them. That would lead to somethingdown the road. I think what cuts lost is the first touch os starting therelationships, not closing the deal, people wel, it's funny the concept of ServantLeadership, and you know I mean we were talking about James Carburry and he'svery passionate about the same thing as in my there's, a reason that you wantto form a relationship where you're not asking for something. First Right: itjust sets people back it ses people back. So if you can provide value inthe interaction, especially in a sale situation, you've done your homework.You understand or have attempted understand what it is that might makethat person. Tak. What challenges that they're having and you don't go rightat him and say: Hey! I got this cool wigit. Do you want it right? That'sjust not the goal in any relationship, regardless of whether it sales orpersonal you have to be aware of. You know the give and take of that, and Ithink the easiest way to do that, as you said, is to provide them somethingthat's going to provide them value out of the gate that that's the stage whereI think a nice parody of the relationship. The trick then becomescarrying it all the way through your interactions in the sales process. HMM,that's a very, very good point, because if you, if you do the right thing andyou get the the sales meeting, but you go into the sales meeting with the sameboring dog and Pony Future Dump, you know then now now you've kind of setyourself back. You probably are not going to get a chance to move forward,and this is very common and technology companies. I worked in technologycompanies and you know everybody's enamored by their unique piece O oftechnology and that's fantastic, but you've got to understand the thebusiness and in fact I'm super excited. My friend ded calvert, has teamed upwith with two other authors of a newbook, that's coming out in the inthe spring and it's all the title is: Stop Selling and start leading. Youknow the whole and it's it has backed with a lot of very rich byer research.Buyers have said through survey, you know, here'swhat we want, we'll talk to sales people who embody these kinds of traitsand characteristics, but we don't want to talk to the people who just come atus with a pitch. So I recognize that a lot of individual contributors againcoming back to training, maybe aren't maybe they're, being trained on thepitch, and you can't blame the employer, though you know it's up to you to driveyour own success. I believe so figure out for yourself. There's lots of great.I mean we're talking about it right now...

...and if you care about your success, if youcare about achieving quota, you can step back and not only do things alittle bit differently, but guess what you will then stand up as a leader inyour own organization. People are going to then look at you and say Ooh Barb.What are you doing? You're? You know. Yourthese people are all responding toyou, theethey're saying yes to meetings. What are you doing differently being accountable, I'm being here right,the accountability and the I see it a lot, and when I was running teams Iselt a lot. It's like look. The organization can only do so muchbecause they've got you know competing priorities. I think everybody not justin sales and everybody. If they're serious about their career should takethat responsibility to continually you know, we should call it Feedin, yourhead feed your head, get yourself trained, get yourself exposed to newconcepts and don't just expect you know something to be handed to you. I don'tknow. Have you come across any way and I'm this slightly off topic, but haveyou come across any way to inspire that effectively inside of sales repliy?They all seem to nod and Oh yeah, but then I very rarely see them. You knowtake the accions why Gary Venerchuck says he gives all his stuff away forfree because he knows nobody's going to take the time to implement it. HMM!Well, you know, I call the concept learn to earn and I think you knowinitially people may shake their head, but you know at a certain moment intime you're either going to be so defeated that you say you know, salessucks and I'm getting out of the profession right or you're, going tosay you're going to churn out of jobs and then one day you're going to wakeup and say yeah. Maybe I am accountable, and so some of that may just have tohappen through some people's life experiences where you know they'reexpecting somebody else to do for them. But you know after having a long careerand selling. Currently, today you know, I just know that if you're going to bein it for the long term, it's your job to make sure that you're staying freshand relevant and on top of what's current and what's coming- and you know,and by the way doing those things happens, to be the exact kind of thingthat that buyers are looking for from sellers. Do you understand their business? Doyou understand what's happening in their competitive world? What abouttheir industry? What trends do you see in technology? That might beinteresting to them? I mean, let's face it. These buyers are busy their headsdown in their own organizations doing their work. They maybe don't have asmuch time to be outside the company. Looking at what's happening from abroader point of view, if you're the consultative problem, solvingsalesperson, who comes to them with fresh insights and ideas, backed bysome smart thinking and demonstrate a little bit of homework which, by theway I didn't have the Internet. When I started in sales, I don't know aboutyou, Chad, no Didt. There is there's no excuse for not being able to go out.There gather some data. Put your thinking, cap on and think about allright V pieces sales are faced with...

...these five challenges. How could Ibring them something different to think about? It could be York white paper,but don't bring that if it's a sales pitch you know forget that it could bean ink article. Maybe it's a survey. You picked up on there's all kinds ofways to do these sorts of things, but I think the trap that a lot of salespeople are falling into and again partially leaderships fault is theyjust come in and they think if I just keep churning these activities,something is bound to happen. Yeah something's bound to happen all right,you'll, probably just wash out of the job wellit's to me, because I didn't havethe know. I didn't have the Internet when I started so the research processtook a little bit more time and effort. So to me having the Internet like giveme ten, fifteen minutes and and especially was a public company. I cango through TNK analygo financials. I can look at the trends a meante taketen minutes and then, when I talkd to a lot of reps today, the first thing Ihear I in fact I just had a conversation with somebody two days ago,like I'm doing all of these things, I'm doing oll things abut. I can't connectwith my customer. Well, what do you know about your customer? What do youmean? What do I know about my cus? Well, did you do any reason why I don't havetime for that? Okay, are you hitting quota because you're not hitting quota?I know you're, not in quota, so take the time everybody a lot of the salesare woing to walk in. They want to talk about themselves because it'scomfortable because they feel more comfortable in that space, but thatexperience that you are creating that impression that you're creating it'sabout making the the buyer understand that you're really trying to understandwhere they're coming from what they're facing, and it shows up through theentire sales process. When we were talking about email before we recordingthat's just one thing, and I see so many spelling airs- and maybe it'sbecause I was an English undergrand drives me absolutely insane, but if yousend a crappy email, you should expect a crapyr response and that's going tocolor the entire sales experience hmmand. You should expect no responseand by the way, this practice lately that some people are getting into hey, barbit so and so from Blah BlahBlah. Did you see my last three emails yeah and I'm ignoring this one? Justlike you know I mae it's like that's all you got. Did you see my lastemail? Well, all three of them were a pitch. They were all about you. Youobviously know absolutely nothing about me or who I am or you know whatever,and people can go, read the L to the prior to the one I just did this week,the two linkeon posts. I took an email from somebody. I took their name out ofit and I've saved these emails. I know you do to and I've put e books together,giving people compare and contrast, but in this post I share the email and thenkind of break it down for people what's wrong. Hopefully, if they read it, you can sort of see that for themselves.If not, I give them a little help and then the second follow on post justtalks about how to do it better and- and I even included a template thatpeople could, you know, consider using an approach they could consider using.I think this is where is important to talk about technology? Automation canonly take you so far and there is...

...nothing wrong with creating templates.I do it too, but it does still require you to think about. Okay, if I'mtargeting this specific industry- let's say it's, you know SASS companies of acertain size or whatever. What are some of the main challengesthere they're potentially facing what are some trends that you're seeing inthe industry? What do you know about their competitors? Again, that's nothard to figure out. You can craft two three sentences. You might push themagain to a white paper, invite them to have a conversation with you about it.What are they seeing? Instead, most of these emails hi, I'mBir Gi, Mocois, social centerd selling. Let me tell you all about our stuffwell, by the way click. This link go watch a video and here's the link to myschedule, and you can schedule sales call with me: Yeah, no, not have them andhen. No,nobody is going to that's why nobody is responding to you and I think, listen, I'm as opinionated as I ever am.I try to be as respectful as I can and with all due respect sales. Folks saying you don't have time to betterrepresent yourself as a consultative seller, that's just being lazy withouta doubt, and it almost to me seems like if they're not willing to do that.Maybe they should be looking at a different career. They probably oughtto be considering it. I mean think about how many pepeople freaked out ayear year and a half ago when forester came out with the big prediction by twothousand and twenty. You know a million sales jobs will be gone. People focus alot on that, but they often don't fuck focus on the other part of the research.In that same report where they say, and five hundred thousand of thosepositions will be replaced by the people who do demonstrate. They've gotbusiness acumen and they can bring real value to the table in terms of helpingbuyers. Think differently. Ind solve problems differently. It's the order,takers, the people who do the feature dumps. Those are the you know, and bythe way, when everybody gets freaked out about artificial intelligence,which I did a great segme weabon Ar Yestar a thought. It was great. I had agreat guest oon, our bright talk, sales expertschannel is about AI and how that that can help sales, people and salesleaders measure what matters. But you know people are getting freaked outabout artificial intelligence if you're going to stay in your little box, whereyou're just pitching features and doing demos. Yes, that can be replaced withartificial intelligence and technology, and that's common pretty fast. Butpeople, especially in complex beto, be sewing situations. They still need the people, thepersonal interaction and so stop waiting. I mean we're two yearsoff right. I mean buyers already want a different kind of salesperson now. Sowhat are you waiting for and that it's not like it's it's notlike it just showed up overnight either...

I mean maybe my no abot my age, but ifI feel like, since I've been in sales, those people that understood you wereselling the people first and foremost absolutely and you got to build thetrust you have to. You have to establish a credibility and talkingabout you all the time yeah everybody's been to a party where there's that guywho's talking about hemselves, that everybody can't wait to get away from,I'm sure they would have been to those parties. So what you know take the takethe moment. Take a deep breath, try and understand what the person you'reyou're sitting across when we're trying to get in touch with his experiencing.So you can connect to that. You know they're not looking to buy thedrill, they're looking to buy the hole in the wall right, t yeah, the hang thepicture and all you guys want to talk about is the drill and I'm notlistening to it. I don't know about. I got I hot other stuff to do nobody'slistening to that and and and there again that's where you know, trainingcan be helpful. I mean a couple years ago in a Sundayafternoon. Don't ask me why I just had got my. I created something called random rancein sales and social selling. Just this quick little presentation, I was justtired of certain things that, unfortunately, some of that hasn'tchanged, but one of the rants was, you know, lose the corporate history.Nobody cares about that. You know. Why do why? Do you want to start a salespresentation taken people through you know twelve slides about how awesomeyour company is. Nobody cares at that point. Nobody cares when you have alimited opportunity to set yourself apart from all the other competitors.If you don't want to look like a commodity, you have to do itdifferently and you just have to realize that that story can come outlater. You've got to grab somebody, I mean think about yourself as as a buyer.You know, I don't know about you chat, but when I get the calls or I you know,I get the emails or my favorites ar when I get somethinglike a situation happened about two months ago I had downloaded this whitepaper is interested in this technology. I thought it could do something for thebusiness got, the you know, email and the call from the REP, and I agreed tospend twenty minutes talking to this person, because I really was interestedin the technology. I literally the first ten. This guy didn't shut up. We said Hello, ten minutes in he'sstill talking about himself, the product ise and finally, I said youknow you need to stop talking. I said: Listen. You haven't asked meone single question about why I was willing to give you time what I wasinterested in related to your technology. You know you asked nothing about my business.You just said hello and you started pitching me straight out of the gate. Isaid so we're probably not going to be doing business together and just knowthat you know I'm in sales as a profession and I've been in it for along time run. Big teams incorporate. You really want to think aboutadjusting your approach. If you get...

...somebody o say Yes to twenty minutes,don't waste it yacking about yourself. You need to find out why they'rewilling to talk to you what I think it was research that I think it was GongGod io put out that you could tell how successful a sales call was they hadall the analytics. That would show you if the sales rap talked more than Ithink it was forty three percent of the time during the initial call theopportunity to win it, that the percentages, his went through the floorright and that twenty minutes, you really want them talking you, don't youdon't want to be talking about yourself that Yo do that later, just asktheitons, but it's amazing how many? How many reps it don't that even thatcrafting, I think, there's an art form and a bit of a science to craftingthose questions. It's part of what you know, it's part of what we teach andwork with people on, but there's this seems to be this reluctance to doingthat because they don't feel as in control of the conversation, so theyget they go right to where they're comfortable. I'm going to talk for tenminutes of this, and hopefully I say something you give a crap about welland that's where investing in learning and doing your homework and broadeningyour you know horizons in terms of betterunderstanding, your own industry and competitive challenges and trends. Allof that can help you get off the script, and you know jet BLANT's latest book onSales Eq. You know JEB talks about it, it's a trigger. So what happened withthis wrap? I knew exactly what happened. Oh my gosh, somebody said Yes to aphone call with me who I got twenty minutes. I better pack, it all in therewell and what I've always said to people chat. If, if someone grants methirty minutes of their time, you can bet the twenty five minutes of thattime. Is Me talking with them about them? You know talking with them about kind of somehomework that I've done and some things that look to and asking the right kindsof questions laten, it's not hard to put your thinking cap on and ask somedecent questions which do not include what keeps you up at night and thatsort of thing- and you know when people will say to me-will barb if they ask me to tell them about our business shouldn't. I dothat. I said no rederect, you know when pep. If someone says to me early on ana sales call, Chad well barb, tell us a little bit about your services and kindof the pricing. I say you know what I don't think we know enough about. Idon't know enough about what you're trying to accomplish yet. So I feel,like that's a little premature. I have a few things. I'd like to validate afew questions. I'd like to ask you, would that be okay? Could we talk aboutthat first and they're like Oh okay and you know, and then we start talkingabout their business and I start asking them questions and then, when you hearthings like wow, that's a really great great question nobody's ever asked usthat I think to myself: That's a sales basic, but hey in their mind. I knowamd then a whole different level than somebody else right, and so I thinkit's important for people to resist the...

...urge you'll get your chance find outwhat the buyer cares about first and build from there yeah. Without Imean without doing that, you cut off all the possibilities couldof Lo possiblies, where you could go and you you instantly get put into thatbox of your just like every other salesperson. That's come through hereyou have no ability to differentiate you're just another, just anotherpitchman. I can totally see how those jobs are. You know on the chopping block andgoing to be impacted by a I, but the sales reps that really take the time.Understand people understand the business and do their homework and knowhow to have a conversation that I think has to be really based on. Truecuriosity, like T I don't know if you've seen it, but for me the salesreps that I have seen be the most effective are the ones that aregenuinely curious about what's going on in the business and what problems arehaving so they can have a dialogue about solving those problems hm and I'mreally glad you said that, because I think this is a good place to say thatthose are the same people and I'm going to put myself in that Camp Chat. Is itthe same people who genuinely care about doing no harm? In other words,they want to do right by the people in the organization. I don't know thatenough. Reps really stop to think about the fact that sometimes people areputting their careers on the line with these buying decisions- and you knowthe last thing you want to do is make promises that can't be kept. The lastthing you want to do is sell something that's going to make problems worse,makes them look bad. I think it's not just a curiosity. It's people whogenuinely in their heart care to do the right thing and sometimes doing theright thing means walking away, means being honest and saying we are not going to be in a position tohelp you solve this problem and I want to connect you with a couple othercompanies, because I think they can help you now. I, when I first did thisyears ago, my boss was standing behind me listening in on a call, and after Igot off the phone, oh my gosh, did he ripp me a new one he's like barb? But what are you doing?Why are you telling that customer and I said because him we actually don't-have a product, that's going to help solve the problem. This is what they'refaced with and I'm not going to sell him something. I said: What do you wantme to do? Sell something knowing it's not only gonna tick them off, becauseit's not going to work. It's going to be a return for us. That's going tolook bad on me. You, the department is Thatd, I'm not goingto go there doing. The right thing was recommending him to talk to these twoother people. You probably knew where I'm going with this story, because thatgentleman came back and ended up buying many hundreds of thousands of dollarsworth of other technology solutions, both hardware and software. Why?Because he never forgot that I was willing to Sayhey we're not able tohelp you here. ' Some people. I think...

...who can- and I think that's I thinktoday more than ever, that is super important. You've got a balance shortterm and long term and if you're just trying to get a short term, sale andyou're, not thinking about the impact that I could potentially make. If itdoesn't go right, that's a problem. WHUT and I've still see it today, acompany that I I will not name. I was looking at technology for ourbusiness and I you know I filled out the form on the website like hey. Iwant to have a demo, I'm willing to give you some of my time and the firstemail I got I mean literally seconds later was hey. We only work withcompanies that are this size, and I don't know if that's you or not, whichirritated me first and foremost you could have looked. It would not havetaken a much time to figure that out right. I don't know if I really shouldschedule time with you or not, and I'm just kind of lit me up so bad that I quickly ensuredthat we were not going to be doing business and went directly to theircompetitor, who said not a problem. Let's talk yeah you're a little bitsmaller than we normally would work with, but we, let's talk see if we cansolve the problem. Well- and you know, right and and frankly that sellsperson's arrogance and rudeness, you're not going to forget that and whileyou're not going to say it here in the podcast, I imagine privatewy, youprobably let some people know- and you know that that should be, and thatshould be an immediate signal to the marketing department because we live in a world where, if you'regoing to fill out a form, it is very easy to include what is the size ofyour business right and if you don't fit the typical size, then a very niceprofessional response would be. You know we don't have enoughexperience supporting companies of your size. Here's some companies, we think,could help you right. Ther there are. There are a lot of other ways you couldhave gone, but I'm sorry insulting a buyer. That's not a good sales tactic,people o not at all I mean it goes back to that experience and honestly itcreated granted. I'm hybr aware of it, because I am so passionae about. I payattention to that stuff, but it created in me reluctance to even really be willing toeven think about them anymore as a potential provider, not only for me,but when I'm asked by other you know other organizations of whatTechnologies would you recommend? I'm not that's not coming up on the list,because I wouldn't want to the experience that I create nd provide. Idon't want to make a recommendation to you know to potential prospect or acustomer to a technology solution where their sales teams are not professionaland to catch myself there. But you know what I mean yeah. Well, of course I do,and you know, and there again, when you think about experience. It's like it'slike you know, skipping a rock on a pond right, the it's going to have thisripple effect and that ripple effect can be a negative one. That impacts youas a sales. A contributor personally...

...can make your company look bad. Youknow now it's expanding further nobody's going to recommend you. Wehave something called social media and social networks. We can actually tellpeople not to buy from you or even talk to you. We can tell them. Theexperience is really poor and here's. Why? Because, in that situation withthat company, if they're very clear that they don't support a smaller sizebusiness, then it's their responsibility to make that clear ontheir website right. You know coming back and to somebody who's expressedinterest and then thinking it's okay to be rude. I just don't think that endovil isgoing to last very long in sales, but hey that's just me. This is this has been an amazingconversation. Is We get? I want to be respectful of time it as we get to theend. If you were to tell sales professionals, one thing that you thinkwould be a great starting point for them to consider their sales experience.What would that be and why I think it comes down to takingresponsibility for your own success child, which we've talked about? Don'twait for somebody else to help, give you the training and the skills and theguidance you need to respond to what buyers say they want from sales people.They will talk to us. It's your job, though, to make it clear how you'redifferent from everybody else who just pitches you look like a commodity. Sothat's my biggest piece of advice, watth Youto videos follow people likeyou and me: Listen A PODCAST! You know get out there and ask questions andtake it on yourself to drive your own personal sales success, because at theend of the day, nobody else is going to do it for you yeah, my mom used to saynobody's going to make you happy, but you and you're responsible for that avebuilt that build that an mom is a wise woman, Yeah Yeah! Yes, it was I'm sureyou know what she's a saint, because I know when I was a child that did notdid not make it easy, but she's definitely insane. So. Thank you barbfor this. This has been great. If people are interested in talking to you easiest way, I mean you're out there onall the social media platforms, but easiest way to connect with you. Whatwould that be? Oh Wow, listen! You can connect with meon Linkedon. You can find mean twitter at Barba. Giamanco read the blog, hey,it's okay, to call me to I'm here in Atlanta Atlanta, Georgia in the US plusone four zero, four, six, four, seven, four, nine two five, I think phone isgreat technology. Anybody's, got questions or interested in a little bitof entering and help just get me a call love to talk to you excellent. Thankyou again very much for the time and has been an absolute pleasure havingyou on the show. Well, thank you. So much for the invitation chat. I reallyappreciate it all right everyone that does it for this episode. Please checkus out at btob. REVIZECCOM show the episode with friends, FamiliesCoworkers, if you like, would you hear, leave US areview on itunes? We do lookat that to determine what type of guests to bring on so you will continuelistening and find value in what we're doing until next time we avalue PrimSolutions, wish you all nothing, but the greatest success...

...you've been listening to the BTBrevenue executive experience to ensure that you never miss an episodesubscribe to the show in Itunes. For your favorite podcast player, thank youso much for listening until next time.

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