The B2B Revenue Executive Experience
The B2B Revenue Executive Experience

Episode · 5 years ago

Audelia Boker on Sales Is Rapidly Becoming More Digital (Here’s How to Stay Ahead of the Trend)

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Lots of companies are trying to map customer journeys across channels, but that may be unnecessary.

The customer journey is becoming more and more digital. A few statistics illustrate the point.

In the UK, eCommerce sales account for just 14% of total retail sales. In the U.S., it’s only 8%. Looking at these, you wouldn’t expect that digital is taking over, but then the narrative shifts when you look at preferences.

It turns out that 40% of U.S. males between the ages of 18-34 say that they would ideally buy everything online. We can all relate to that desire for convenience.

We’re also more and more demanding from digital platforms put out by service providers. 39% of us would stop engaging with a website if it takes too long to load.

These statistics and more come from our guest today: Audelia Boker, VP of Marketing at Glassbox Digital. Audelia made a case for why understanding the online behaviors of your prospects and customers is more important now than ever.

Find a breakdown of this episode here.

There is no one size fits all solution for optimizing your sales and marketing organizations. Yet how you sell and market as a tremendous differentiator. Value Prime Solutions uses proven formulas and frameworks with a customized approach to increase your sales and Marketing Roi to learn more about how we can help you, visit value Prime Solutionscom. You're listening to the B Tob Revenue Executive Experience, a podcast dedicated to helping executives train their sales and marketing teams to optimize growth. Whether you're looking for techniques and strategies or tools and resources, you've come to the right place. Let's accelerate your growth in three, two, one. Welcome every one of the B Tob Revenue Executive Experience. I'm your host, Chad Sanderson. For those that don't have time to listen to the entire episode, please feel free to check us out at be to be read exactcom or on Itunes, where, of course, of reviews always appreciated. Today we had with US ad a booker, VP of marketing with glass box of digital, another a company which provides a platform for understanding enhancing a customers digital experience in its entirety. I'm sure I'm not doing that justice, but we'll give out a chance to explain that in a little bit more detail. And, as our listeners always been a great deal of time working with companies to perfect their digital experiences in the past and and learning from the insight. So having a day on the show is extremely exciting today. And if that's not enough, we're going to focus on our sales is becoming increasingly digital and nature and how you can stay ahead of this trend. So it did it first. Thank you very much for taking the time to be on the show and welcome. It's my absolute pleasure chat. So we like to start with a kind of an odd question. We like to try and upload value up front for people that can't listen to the entire episode. So I like to ask each guest if you think back across your career to something that might have been a defining moment, something that you go back to over and over that you've learned something from. Would love to understand what that what that defining moment was and what you took away from it. HMM, that's that's an interesting question. I have a couple of defining moments. I happen to have relocated twice in my life already so far, and I think one of the most interesting or defining moment, as you call it, was when people gave me a chance. You know, when you come to a new country and you don't have the network you used to have and people just trust in you and give you a real chance. The second moment I I was actually promoted during my maternity, which is quite unusual, and again, I think you know, being given a vote of confidence is something that I tried to take with me and give back. And then when I hire people and I try with my team's to always emphasize, you know, what they're good at and because that's the way to empower people, and I believe that as long as you have people with passion and...

...good work ethics, that's the only thing you can actually do. The best thing to do is to basically give them a chance and believe in their in their strength. Actually, it's a servant leadership type of thing give to get. Very important to recognize that you know in your inner coworkers, in yourselves, as opportunities are rare. Something glad to hear that you've benefited from those. So, for our listeners just so that they're a little bit more detail. Can you kind of tell us about glass box digital and your role there? Yes, absolutely so. Glass box digital is a company that is originally from Israel. As of now, we moved the headquarter to London and we also have operations in the US. What we actually do is quite simple. If you think of a customer hitting an organization's website or mobile APP. The minute a person does that, we actually start recording the session for the organization. So it can sound scary, but actually it's really, really useful, and we automatically record, automatically index all the data so that actually we can reconstruct the session in real time and because we have such rich data, we can of course run very deep analysis. So we have an analytics platform with an and a new layer of machine learning and artificial intelligence, and we're basically able to automatically provide insights on not only what are people doing on your digital channels, but why are you they behaving the way they do, and that can be leveraged across the organization in multiple ways. So it's a true ability to really understand. It's kind of not to say oversee your big brother, but to really see how somebody is actually engaging in that digital experience cross platform, so it's not just where it's mobile and any device. Absolutely, and just imagine you you're sitting on, you know, the people, the person's shoulder and watching a replay of the session exactly as they experienced it. So it's quite powerful. Excellent, excellent. So as we were targeting the topic for today's show, we started to focus on sales and it's increasingly digital aspect. So I was wondering if you could span for our audience. You know why? Why that topic and why are you so passionate about it? Yeah, absolutely. A couple of years ago I used to meet a lot of customers in a previous company and everybody was trying to map customer journeys across channel and I think that's still a big topic. But actually the journey itself is becoming more and more digital. We see, you know, and the market potential is huge. I mean I've got it with me some statistics. You know. If for ECOMMERCE cells in the UK they can't for just fourteen percent of the total retail cells, in the US it's only eight percent. So you know there is still room to grow. But from a preference perspective,...

...forty percent of US mails between the age of eighteen and thirty four say that they would ideally buy everything online. So you know, and fifty one of the Americans, you know a state that they prefer to shop online. You know, and I think we've all you know, you we can all relate to that, and we also are more and more demanding from the digital platforms of our service providers. So you know, thirty nine percent of US would actually stop engaging with a website if it takes too long to load. That's you know that that's absolutely crazy and I'm only you know, so far I've just been stating e commerce. If you look at mobile banking, it's huge. I mean in two thousand and fourteen for forty seven percent of Americans primarily used digital banking. Today it's already close to seventy percent of using online banking and mobile banking primarily. So you know, this is just to illustrate how much, you know, our lives basically have changed in the last in the last decade, and for my children, you know, it's become obvious that we don't, you know, we don't buy a pair of shoes in store which are order it from the Internet. So that's just to emphasize the importance of the digital channels and having ways to understand how people are behaving on those channels is becoming crucial. And how do do you do organization acquire these customers, but also how do they behave once they are on your mobile APP or on your website? I'm actually old enough that I remember the first time that somebody said, oh no, you just ordered that online, don't go to the shoe store and try on the shoes. Yes, what possibly do that? And maybe that's given away too much of my age, but man, I yea, it is definitely changed. You're not kidding. So in the so a lot of this sounds like, you know, mobile bi in that kind of stuff. Of Sounds beat ISC. Are you seeing some of the same trends on the be to B side, where you're seeing an increase in the digitization of that sales process as well? Absolutely, I must say that only you know, only a couple of days ago I was actually with a prospect of our to here in the UK. One stay the name because you know I hard. They are Telco Organization and they have a whole organization that sells be to be. They have identified very clearly that in order to engage their custom their own customers, they need to be more digital. So it's not only a BTC thing. It's becoming increasingly a be to be matter, because at the end of the day, you know, the being beach bees is still people and people, you know, want the simplicity and the immediacy of engaging with a service provider online, and I think that's becoming true across the board. Yeah, it's interesting, right, that the whole digitization has...

...really if it's used properly right, essentially, what you're doing is you're you're increasing your chances of having a meaningful connection with the human but the digitization and the digital aspects allow you to be much more discerning in terms of where you want to spend your time. So if a company is not focused on that and they're definitely behind the curve. Yeah, absolutely. So you mentioned something in one of your emails and I have to have to read it direct because I'm not a hundred scent sure what it means, but we were talking about business people feeling like they are where they are on the selfsufficiency it dependency access? Yes, so can you help me understand that? Yeah, I appreciate I wasn't very clear, but you know, if you imagine an access a spectrum, on one end you have, you know, total self sufficiency when it comes to accessing the data that you need in order to make decision, business decisions, and on the other side of the spectrum you have it dependency. Right. So I'm very interested in knowing where business exects feel they are on that spectrum, because I think that what technology brings to the you know, to the table today, is the ability for business users to have access to data in a very self sufficient manner so that they don't need, you know, to depend on on it or on data, say, and scientists, in order to get the reports and the data they need to in order to understand their market or their customers. And you know, glass boxes is all about that. It's about democratizing the access to data in a way that is digestible, that is very visual, because, you know, pactures a thousand words. One of our custle, one of our customers, one said to me, you know, at the end of the day, big data is ugly. You know, it was quite a powerful sentence to say. I mean, it's true and on the end of the day, you want people within an organization to have access to data, to be able to relate to that data and in a way that is friendly, and for everybody to have what is, you know, I use the buzz word of three hundred six to are single customer view. But at the end of the day, if if everyone, everybody, has access to data that is digestible and understandable, then everybody can understand the struggles that customers are facing and being agile enough to fix them in a timely manner, and I think that that's really interesting, without a doubt. I mean it's always been at this my experience, you know, the big data and its data insights. You have the data scientists who get it, but then the business people that kind of look, you know, they can kind of look like a confused puppy, right head still left, like what what the heck am I looking at? So being able to provide them with a solution that makes it accessible to them, and it's extremely powerful, absolutely especially, you know, in a dynamic environment where your website and your mobile are constantly changing. They are, you know, being updated every every week, or every month. To me, these things...

...are very, very dynamic and being able to go back to data with to actively being able to access the data, you know, without having heavy maintenance and then tugging and all and configurations and being able to, you know, be hands on. This is really being hands on. I think that's really what what a lot of organizations, at least in the enterprise a segment, are looking for today. Excellent, as you mentioned earlier, Personas, and I remember, having spent ten years with with digital agencies, we've talked about journey maps and empathy maps, customer personas, and I've seen a lot more sales organizations attempt to do kind of buyer journeys and buyer personas. Right, there's a difference between, probably especially in the Bab space, who you're selling to versus who's actually using the solution. So I mean glass box provides the ability to look over somebody's shoulder and record those those episodes. But I'm curious if there's a way, when you're helping your sales organization, think about the buyers that may be the ones that you know sign the checks for glass box. Do you guys develop by our journeys and buyer personas to help the sales teams were is that really aggregated more from sample data from the glass box platform? To be completely honest, I mean we're still, you know, at the startup states, so we're we're kind of a small and leane organization. We the NSWOY is we probably should and what we do tend to be very focused on is, you know, mapping our target accounts in a way that we clearly understand who is going to be the user, what's the use case and who is the decision maker? Who is the buyer, as you call it, the Bier Persona? Sometimes, you know it's not a single person. Sometimes you know budget will come from several sources. It can be a t can be innovation, can be digital, it varies. So the buyer persona yeah, at the end of the day you want to know what the journey of that single person that you know holds budget. But very often, when when you sell to very large organizations, it's a complex cells the cycle where a lot of people are involved and you need to spend a lot of time, you know, being the embassador and socializing your solution within within an organization. So, to make a long story short, I think the answer is we should, but we haven't reached a stage where we have, you know, dedicated marketing assets for each one of the steps of the journey, for each one of the personas. But we're getting there. Excellent, excellent. So we talked about it when we're going emails back and forth, but concepts like real timeliness and retroactivity in terms of data accuracy, can you help our audience understand what you were referring to there? Yes, absolutely, I think you know, one of the examples I can give in terms of real timeliness is, you know, as an end customer, if I try to self serve on a website and I fail to do so for whatever reason,...

...right, and then falling into the the obligation, if you will, of calling a call center, Customer Care Representative is going to answer me and this this poor person on the line doesn't have any idea of what just happened to me five minutes ago. Right. So this is, you know, very frustrating both for me and for that person. And basically, you know, technology and glass box especially provide visibility in real time to that' to that specific customer care representative, to replay the session, you know, understanding a matter of a few seconds what's been going on and because it it's working in really time, that person can almost code rows without, you know, taking control, taking over your desktop, but just understand, with a slight delay of a couple of seconds, what you're trying to do on your website and guide you in real time so that you know. Some of our customers have reduced the duration of support calls in the call centers from five minutes to a minute and a half. That's that's seventy five percent reduction. I mean, you know, in terms of cost reduction, you do the math. Yeah, it is significant. So this this has to do with real timeliness. The other aspect of that is that all the data that we collect, you know, can be exported and I can share it with my peers in within the organization. So if I'm a I'm a team leader in the call center and I noticed that my team is dealing, let's say, with a lot of calls on the same topic today, I can then, you know, raise a flags and all the data, with sample replays of the sessions to the it department and tell them, Hey, guys, there seems to be an issue with that page. Could you have a look into it? And because they have access to glass books as well, they will be able to identify whether it's a usability issue and availability issue, maybe it's a performance tissue, but really, in very quick time frames be able to pinpoint the issue and fix it. So that's that's for real timeliness. The second aspect dimension is retro activity. You know, we see a lot of our customers using glass box for compliance purposes as well and dispute management. Now because, as we said, you know my website is looks a certain way today and might look very different tomorrow. Plus, what I see on, you know, my banks website isn't necessarily what you're seeing on the same website because everything is personalized. So, because everything changes, it's very difficult to provide evidence. You know, if you have an ordered, if the regulator is knocking on your door and asking for proofs, it's becoming extremely and increasingly difficult to provide evidences. So with the to like like ours, but I'm sure there are other,...

...you can actually provide temper proof, time stamped digital footprint of all the the sessions and you can go back real retractively and replay sessions, even if they happened two or seven years ago, doesn't matter right in the same way, your customers experience them. And actually some of our you know, some of our customers went to court with which replace and and then when the one their cases, because it is a digital proof that is, you know, unquestionable. So you know, the ability to go back in time and analyze what's been happening. You know, if you identify an issue on your website today, you want to understand. You probably want to understand for how long has it been impacting my customers, and you probably want to be able to also provide remedy and go back to those customers that were impacted. So in order to do that you need very, very rich data, and this is what we are about. So that's what I meant by itself. So you know the context. You know it becomes more and more important. I again, maybe it's an age thing, but I remember when they first started telling me my cell phone would track where I was and I thought why in the world would I want anybody to know where I am? Well, fast forward five, six, seven years and now, if my phone doesn't know where I am, like if it doesn't have that condensual whareness. I'm annoying. And in the sales process it's the same thing. If you're especially customer experience, if you're dealing with a customer, you really want the ability to understand their context, because they expect you to. Now, expectations exact change. Yeah, weight. So they're willing to give up that. I don't want to use the BUZZWORD privacy, but they're willing to. They're willing to give you more insight into what they're doing if they will provide them a much more frictionless experience. Absolutely, and you won't. You want also to be able to end, you know, to integrate the data in ways that I'm meaningful. So if you have, let's say, you know, a voice of the customer survey on you website, you want to be able to understand. Let I'm making that up right now, but let's say. Am I want to analyze all the sessions of people that spend more than five second on the cart page. Right. So these are very qualified people that are interested, they have something in their cart but then gave a poor rat in to my website. Right. These are very tangible that, you know, people that I want to get in touch with because, hey, they are qualified, they wanted, they tried, or maybe they even bought something on my weapon butllst but for some reason they ranked my website poorly. So I do want to understand why so excellent and so so. With last box, I can look over the pretelling. I'm looking on the shoulder of my customers, are my prospects, and I'm curious, though, how do you take that single customer view and link it to kind of aggregate it up for those business executives...

...to enable business agility? So, first of all, you know we are able because we collect absolutely everything, including, you know, water customer or visitor for that matter, sees everything that person does or any mouse movement, any finger gesture if he's on a mole device, but also anything a person types in. Right, we are able to stitch together, if you will, sessions even though they are disjointed. So, just to give you an example, if you know, I brows my banks website several times a day from the same ip address and at some point I logged in right, I will be able to trace back all that, all those sessions, because I have collected both the IP address the email address of that person. Or any you know, unique identifier that that person may have typed in and therefore we are able to understand that this is the same person. Now, how does this translate into a single customer of view? Because, again, it's a very open system. You can actually pour all the data into your Data Lake Initiative or your be I or, you know, whatever that a warehouse or big data initiative you may have, and basically enrich all the data you already have about your customers and understand in a deeper way your customers and visitors. So by, you know, doing that, you increase business agility because you break down all the silos, right you you basically provide all the data and then different people across your organizations are going to use the data in different ways, but at the end of the day it's all the you know, the source is the same and and that's what makes all the the whole difference excellent, excellent. So let's pivot a little bit here and let's let's talk about kind of your top business objective at last box in your role and kind of how you're applying these concepts internally. Right. So well, you know, we have very simplistic goals because because we are, we are small and we're big enough to grow and and and small enough to care. So the two main goals I have as a VP marketing is a to to to create awareness around glass box, because we, you know, the brand was created only eighteen months ago. So we really want to, you know, to associate glass box into what we're doing, to understand what session replay is, to understand that we're you know, we're supporting both websites and mobile channels, mobile APPs. So there's a lot of education to be done on one end. On the second end, we don't have the luxury to doing, you know, only awareness and we need to generate leads. So for me, understanding,...

...you know, I use glass box obviously on our website, and being able to understand, you know, where are people coming from? Where are they struggling? On my website, I can, you know, I can give you a very funny example we were using on our website, you know, the capture planning and the questions that were asked. There were mixing between letters and numbers so that they would have, you would have, you know, the number six plus then the field that people need to fill in equals eight, but eight reatten in letters right, and people would get confused because they didn't know if they needed to fill in the the the the the field with a figure with less. So yet you know, these are thing you can only understand if you watch the replace. If not, I mean I wouldn't have never imagined that this was an issue, but it was and you know, and people were dropping, abandoning the the the session because of that. So it's really a matter of drilling into what's happening on your digital channels, being able to react immediately, you know, when someone performs and transactions or requested them, oh, being able to react to that and forward it to the to the relevant sells people, etc. Etc. So it's being very, very agile and hands on. And so when you when you trying to accrease that awareness and understand how your own customers or are going to the website in the buyers during I know you guys are start up and every I mean I've done my fair share, so everybody wears multiple hats. I'm kind of curious. Do you have, you know, a sales team that you work with, or is it really just kind of all hands on deck? If there's a prospect it's you know, how do you guys approach? Well, we definitely have a self team. We actually have a hybrid model. So in the US and in the UK we work direct in the rest of the world we work with business partners, we work with the big big guys and but also with the local signs and we have a team of a customer success as well to make sure that, you know, the all proof of concepts are scoped properly and that you know, customers are happy along the entire journey from, you know, the very beginning when we start discussing the POC through the commercials and then when they use glass box as customers make sure that they actually get the value out of the tool. So yeah, so if I'm if I'm a sales up for glass box, sorry, just dawn on me. So if I'm if I, let's say I was selling glass box to be enterprises, I would have the ability to see what my prospect had done, not just to see the like page lengths. I could. Today, most systems will say hey, they went to this page or they went to that page and you know that kind of stuff. But I actually, as a sales rep could replay so you know, call it, I don't know. Let's pretend it's well as Fargo. Let's Samson some on the Wells Fargo and I know they came from the right Ip address. So I can...

...actually see, as a sales up, how my prospect went through that site across the multi platform digital touch points. I could replay that as I prepped for my next meeting. Absolutely, that's exactly what we do. That is awesome. I can I can do I can't give you I can do it. Just don't know. I'm like, crap, I want it's I know it's Joe dropping right, but yes, absolutely. I can give you the example of one of our UK customers. Actually, it's one of the top banks here in the UK. I want again. I mean most of our customers want to remain you know, Annema, sure, but they discovered, you know, they knew they had a conversion rate shoe on their online account opening rate and there was a lot of pressure and there was an entire analyst team across India and the UK working on that issue and they couldn't, you know, they couldn't put their heads around what what the problem was. We came in and at the POC level, so I'm doing a proof of concept. We were able to show them that. You know, we started capturing all the sessions of those those people that did not convert, and we are what we made them realize is that people that you know spent twenty minute on a form filling in their personal information in order to open an online account, but all the people that had special characters or spaces in their names would actually be ejected at the end of the process without having any error message or any notification telling them that there was an issue. You know, and this bank happens to be the number one bank in the UK for people relocating. So all the people you know from South Europe or even know the New York with all these weird characters and accents on their names, all these people would actually go through the entire process, click sub meat and just at the end be ejected from the system. So you know that the end we were literally able to show them that in a few minutes, right, so you know it. Take that to and another example, if I may, if we still have time. Sure they realized they had a loan page for short term loans and on that page there were two sliders right, one for the amount that people wanted to borrow, and the other slider for the duration and the minimum duration for these short, short term loans, what was twenty four months. And what they realize is that people were trying to pull the slider to the left, further to the left, because they wanted to reimburse in nest and twenty four months. But there was such offering, you know, there was some no such products. So they actually want with these replaced to their CEO and so I look, we have an opportunity there. Let's, you know, let's create a product of, you know, short term loans for twelve to eighteen months, and you know there's Demond for it. So it's not only about, you know, usability shoes it. You know, you can also reveal or identify the opportunities in you in your market. So yeah,...

...that's yeah, that's an amazing tool. I mean, I spent so much time with companies trying to help them understand why design and that experiencing was so important, but to be able to actually have a tool that can validate that and uncover not only friction areas or user areas but business opportunities, I mean that's a that's a pretty powerful offering and it's a salesperson. I'm literally sitting here thinking, man, I would love to have the ability to see what some of my prospects were really looking at, how they were interacting with, you know, all the digital assets that we put out. So very, very impressive, tool, very impressive. So let's change direction just a little bit. As we it towards the end of the interviews. I ask you, guess, kind of two standard questions. The first is simply, you know, as a VP marketing in a startup view that makes you kind of a prospect for some people who are out there trying to sell you things, and that's so I'm curious what is it as a revenue executive, that would get your attention or inspired you to engage with someone who was trying to sell you something? Gosh Yeshi on a target. It's a it's a very, very good question. Actually, you know, you sent me these questions yesterday evening, my time. I kept on thinking, how am I going to answer that question, because it's very difficult to pinpoint what it makes me actually open and meet an email. I think I think there's you know, as I mentioned earlier, was it thirty nine percent of people would would abandon a website if it takes too much time to load. I think there was another statistic I didn't mention it, but about if the user vieuser interface is not nice and friendly, I won't even look at it. So all these very worthy emails, I think what it all comes down to is when people that are reaching out are really genuine and are coming to me with with a proposition that really relates to my needs as a startup. So some people, you know, have very generic emails and you cannot you get the feel that they kind of it's spamming right. It's really they send the same the same thing to everyone. And and I'm pretty you know, I'm using these tools myself, so I know there are ways to personalized, etc. But when someone you know, reach out to a business my you know our size, I think you have to put you yourself in their shoes and relate to their to their needs. So anyone who comes up with a proposition that is not risky, that relates to my target audience, you know, that gives me something before asking me to get something. All these things make me reaction in positive way. All the all the automated stuff which I can very easily, you know, identify I mean and getting very you know some some names have become my virtual best friend. And you know, I'm getting emails from the same...

...person I've never spoken to and and it's kind of because I'm not always unscer slaving or not always asking to remove myself from from their distribution is they keep getting them. I'm not even looking at the easy at these emails. So I think being shortened to the point being crisp, having emails that look good right, that what moves the needle for me when it comes to reacting to someone who's targeting me as a potential because to me so it's of totality experience right. It's frantic, it's genuine, it's not coming right at you with an ask, it's understanding, doing the research, understanding that you may have specific problems they might be able to help, making sure that their professional and courteous, respectful of the amount of time that they're taking. Absolutely and stinking why when you know what sets them apart, because many of the the emails that I'm getting are so similar. Why would I even, you know, respond to someone who's telling me that he's doing the best seo. Right, I mean that all sing the same. Right, come with a if you come with a real, you know, Russian now and with with the a couple of references is, then I'm happy to you know, get in touch. Okay, excellence. The last question. We call it our acceleration inside. So if there was one thing you could tell, you know, sales marketing professionals, one piece of advice that you think would help them, you know, beat their targets being more successful, what would that be and why? I think the best piece of advice I would give it that's made me, because I'm very start up minded, is to is to dare and to do you know, I like the eight twenty rule. I don't wait for things to be a hundred percent percent perfect. And also, because I'm half Israeli, you know, don't get stuck because the door is closed, because even then always close. There's always a window you can always break from, you know, there's always the window. You can get in front through the window. So that's that's really the spirit being creative, daring, being, you know, different and not trying to be perfect. Again, as you told me at the beginning of the interview, right, there's no such thing as being perfect right, and that's my piece of a doubt advice. That's for what's excellent. I know it's excellent. I think a lot of people these days have a tendency to be easily distracted or dissuaded from from what their goals are and while there's just as many tools out there to help from a digital standpoint, to make it easier, there's more noise too, so people have to be a little bit more focus. I think that's I think that's excellent advice. Thank you for that. So all right, everyone that does it for this episode, please check us out at me to be V exaccom share the episode of friends, families, Co workers, and please do his favorite writer review on Itunes. But Day, I can't think you're enough for your time to day. It's been an absolute pleasure to have you on the show. Likewise, Chad again, thanks everyone for listening to order into our...

...day for these valuable insights. Until next time we have value prime solutions. We shooting your team nothing but the greatest success. You've been listening to the BB revenue executive experience. To ensure that you never miss an episode, subscribe to the show and Itunes or your favorite podcast player. Thank you so much for listening. Until next time,.

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