The B2B Revenue Executive Experience
The B2B Revenue Executive Experience

Episode · 4 years ago

3 Things Sales Executives Need To Hear, But Are Ignoring with David Shatz

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Sales executives face challenging jobs with ever increasing numbers, so it is no wonder it is easy to lose sight of the things which can truly increase revenue performance.

David Shatz shares a powerful story from his 20+ year career and breaks down the three things he feels sales executives need to be hearing but for some reason are ignoring.

www.b2brevexec.com

David Shatz on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/davidshatz/

Chad Sanderson on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/chadsanderson/

Value Prime Solutions: www.valueprimesolutions.com

You were listening to the BDB revenueexecutive experience, a podcast dedicated to helping the executives train their sales and marketingteams to optimize growth. Whether you're looking for techniques and strategies were tools andresources, you've come to the right place. Let's accelerate your growth in three,two, one. Welcome everyone to the B Tob Revenue Executive Experience.I'm your host, Chad Sanderson, and today we're taking a little bit differenttact than some of the other episodes you've probably listen to. We're going totalk to one of the newest members of the value Prime Solutions Team, DavidSchatz, who's a new managing partner with us. We're going to talk abouthis background, give you guys some insights into what he's bringing to the tablefor our clients and for those that are interested working with us, and thenalso dig into, you know, the three things he thinks you revenue executivesout there should hear that. You're probably not listening to so, David,welcome to the show. Thanks, Dad. I'm honored and a little humble.I don't know that I'd go that...

...far, but do appreciate you takingthe time. We all know times the most valuable thing we have, soI do appreciate it. But let's just start with your background. How'd youget into sales? I can I can take it pretty far back, Iwould say, to when I was in fifth grade and I started selling gumby the piece. So you laugh, but mom would buy me the gum. So my I cost a good soul was zero hundred percent profit, andI did that until I probably got caught with a huge pocket of loose changeby the principle. She called home and said Hey, this is probably nota good idea to be selling gum, but meanwhile I had the entire fifthgrade class lined up. There was three classes and they were all lined upoutside of my classroom giving me ten cents apiece for Gum. So I gota little little bit of a taste of sales there and really probably two moreimportant incidents in my life forced me, or kind of where I gravitated towardssales. The second one, I would...

...say, would be probably organic chemistry. I would say I went into college as premed, beating my chest I'mgoing to become a doctor, and then I met a tough gentleman I liketo call organic chemistry. Got To be in organic chemistry. Dad looked atmy transcripts that I'm not paying for these. Might be time to change your major. So I changed my major to entrepreneurial studies with a kind of afocus on sales. And I think the third pivotal moment, which is whatreally got me into my sales career, was I started working at a softwarecompany right out of college in customer support, Gray Way to learn a product,and I was making ten bucks an hour. They may not sound likea lot, but it was one thousand nine hundred and ninety four. Probablystill still wasn't a lot. So first week, Mr Gung Ho, lovethe job, love talking to customers, and I worked fifty hours and lookat my paycheck and I got paid for forty. So I went to myboss and I said Hey, what's going...

...on? Said this is a fortyhour a week job. Doesn't matter how often or how long you work,we're going to pay for forty hours. And he said want to make moremoney, getting a sales so six weeks later I was a sales rap,a very green sales rap, and that was nineteen ninety, probably late nine, nine four one nineteen ninety five and I've been in been in sales eversince. Excellent. So as you go through your career, what made youdecide to kind of you know, I've been told I've jumped the fence right. I was in marketing first and then I went to the dark side andwent to sales and now I've gone to the apparently the even darker side ofsales enablement. What made you make the decision to come to value prime solutions? Well, I was trained on the value selling framework probably in late thelate Arro two thousand by Rick Macnach, Mr Mancinich, the legend, thelegend, and Rick and I we would talk probably once or twice a year, which is pretty rare, I think, for a sales trainer and an attendee, a young attendee. I think...

I was probably twenty five, hundredand twenty six at the time Rick train me, but I gravitated towards theframework. I've used the framework really and every position I've held since Rick trainme and Rick would always take my call. We would always spend more than justthirty seconds on the phone and I always toyed with hey. When Ihave the experience I'd love to be the next about that bar set pretty highthe next rick. That is a very high bar, very very high bar. I'll probably never reach that. But the way rick delivered the class,the way rick took the time to learn our business and I was at acompany selling to not for profits, which is a very different what we thoughtwas a very different sale, and Rick always had an answer to our questionsand we had some tough questions for Rick, but he took the time to learnour business and the framework that he brought to the table just seems sosimple, a powerful I know that sounds like a commercial but it's really notwhen you are out in the field using it to great success. So that'sbut finally, it just you know,...

I had a couple of positions whereI had some exits and finally probably back in in two thousand and fifteen,I opened up my own consulting business and I really wasn't prepared to deliver theframe. War Wasn't certified. was still talking to rick once or twice ayear and then a couple months ago it just seem like a great fit andit was time to nick the jump. Excellent will. We're extremely excited tohave you on the team. Thank you. So can you mention consulting and you'vedone you know, you've worked with clients. He got a story,a funny story about consulting in your experience that you always go back to ortell a cocktail parties. I can try. I've been told by my son andmy wife that my humor is my humor and it's not really funny.Stop, stop at the DAD jokes. So my up, I guess ifI take you back, I'm might be dating myself, but I didn't seethis episode live, but if you remember the old odd couple with any ranks. Oh Yeah, and he writes on the board assume. Would never assumeanything because when you assume something, and...

...he's I think he circles the firstthree letters of the war, you make an ass out of you and mewhen you assume something. Yep. So literally, my first meeting I wasa green consultant and I was meeting with a friend and I was I wasdoing two things. I was helping get software developed with entrepreneurs, getting mobileAPPs developed and enterprise software developed. I just farming them out to a networkthat I had established of development shops and I was also trying to do salesconsultant. So I go into this meeting and I'm assuming then I'm going tosell these guys an APP. Easy Sale, friends of mine, and we talkedfor maybe ten minutes. Their eyes glaze over. I'm talking about technology. I am assuming that they need an APP without really doing any questions because, hey, they agreed to meet with me about an APP, right,they're gonna buy that. So simple. And after ten minutes they say,David, we don't need an APP. All of our technology providers, andthese guys were benefits brokers, all of our technology providers provide the tech weneed to give to our customers. We're...

...not going to spend x dollars onan APP. However, would you be interested in talking to us about howyou might coach our sales team? So I'm not sure that's funny. It'sfunny because I felt like an idiot, foot inmouth, thinking I'm going tosell these guys, you know, a really expensive at like all this commissionand it turned into kind of I stay. They turned the tables on me andhired me as a sales consultant. Well, I mean it's a lotbetter turnout than it could have been right. I mean, anytime you walk inwith assumptions it gets really dangerous. Yes, so I've learned not toassume. It was a lesson. I know you asked for something funny.It was more enlightening of maybe ask questions and see what the customer needs beforeyou go in there and beat your chest like an eight honor boundarilla and assumethat you know what the prospect needs without asking some some diagnostic questions. Yeah, well, it's I mean, Hey, it's what keeps us in business,right, because most sales refs don't do that, and I'm I've alwayswondered why. Maybe it's fear, maybe it's just lack of preparation, butthat concert, Hey, I want to...

...talk to you about my product andmy features and my benefits and you haven't even asked a question to know ifthey really give a crap or not. Yeah, and I think I mayhave heard it on one of our podcasts or or someone said it to merecently. There's salespeople have two types of either speaking or listening. They arethey like to speak and then in like a way to speak. So thiswas more of let's just listen. Listen to what the problems are and Imight have a solution, I might not, but at least I know what yourstruggles are, what your challenge is, are what your business issues are,and maybe I can solve them. Excellent. It was an eye openerfor me. Imagine your board sets a target of twenty percent revenue growth ineighteen months. So something will have to change with your sales team. Howdo you be your target? Value Prime solutions can help ensure your managers andreps are leveraging a sales framework that focuses on value, not price. Don'tassume you have it all figured out. Don't wait until it's too late.Visit Value Prime Solutionscom and let them help.

Excellent. All right. So,speaking of listening, what are the three things that you think revenue executivesneed to hear today that, for whatever reason, they are hearing there?Maybe they're ignoring or they're just missing. What would be the first one?I think number one for me, and I've always tried to do this myself, I've always tried to teach this because I think at the beginning of mycareer. I'll get to that in a second. I heard somebody that Iwould I said I'd never want to be that guy. Is At think andI think this needs to flow downhill from the chief revenue officer, SPP salesor whatever it is. But teach your team to be likable and humble.Nobody wants to buy from somebody that is not likable, you know, unlessyou're in a desert and they're selling your water. Pay Anything. I gotus have to be likable, but I remember in my career I was,I think I hadn't even have a cue at a third of a cube andI would listen to this this gentleman who sell a friend today. Wan't themany names, but he would basically say, Hey, this is so andso fromso and Soo. Can you buy...

...my stuff? And it wasn't thatthat bad, but it was. I don't want to be that guy whodoesn't care about how you're doing on the other end of the line, doesn'twant to available relationship and it's not very likable and certainly not a humble sothat's number one for me. I think if reps are likable and humble,it's easier to develop that foundational relationship and now you'll get a chance to talkabout your solutions. But if they're not likable and not humble. You're fightingcan uphill that out and that's a tough challenge. It's a tough challenge forrevenue exactly, especially with teams at scale right but it is critical, withouta doubt. I would agree. Number two is I think you have tocreate a great culture. The days of the boiler room atmosphere, of poundingthe phones and and looking at specific metrics, without having a great place to work, without recognizing certain things that might not be, you know, ahuge enter price sale. But if you have that culture and people want tocome to work. I remember one of my early positions. I saw aguy that wouldn't take the elevator any stud...

I'm so excited to come to workI run up three flights of stairs to get to my desk and that's that'salways something I strived for in the positions I've taken. Of It's a greatculture, not just because you're making a lot of money, selling a lotof stuff and getting commissions, but you love coming to work. It's almostlike that that to beer test. I'll have one beer with anybody, butthe people I want to I want to work with, are passionate about whatwe're doing and I want to have that second, third beer and maybe maybethe fourth and fifth beer exactly. All right. So what's the third?The third thing I think is really important is redefining what a win is,especially as a rat. A sales rep gets rolling in their career. Itmight take you, depending on your sales cycle, three, four, fivemonths to close a deal, or maybe an enterprise it's a two year salescycle. You have to redefine the win and sometimes the wind is in closingthat deal, but it's building a pipeline to a certain number a certain numberof deals or a certain number of millions of dollars or whatever that the metricmight be. Might be having a great...

...phone call, it might be havingthe ability to schedule a meeting or several meetings. Might be getting the nextmeeting. But if revenue executives want to build great teams, I really thinkthey have to redefine that win and let their sales reps walk out of theoffice, whatever time they're leaving after a full day, and say, youknow what I want today? I might not have closed the deal, butI'm getting closer to closing that deal. Yeah, that celebrate the little windsright, because I mean look, sales is not easy. We know thehope that we would live on rejection. I mean that's essentially what you getday in and day out. So if you especially as things get more complex, if you can't help them celebrate the little winds, it's going to bea huge challenge. You know, a lot of its coaching right, makingsure that that that prevailing attitude flows downhill from the top. And at theend of day, we all have a number to report to, whether it'sto the street or to our boss, but sometimes you have to you.I think you're more likely to be successful when you have a positive attitude.I know that sounds a little corny,...

...but we all know that when we'reunder DREST, when we're under stress and we haven't had a closed deal ina long time, we sound desperate on the phone. Yeah, right,but if I'm getting recognition from my manager or my vp of sales or myCEO, that says hey, I know you didn't close that deal yet,but you're on your way. How can I help? Let's redefine the whinright. I get huge, excellent, excellent, three great points. Ireally appreciate that. If people that are listening to the podcast want to reachout talk to you more. What's the best way to get a hold ofyou? You can always connect with me on Linkedin. I rarely read ararely met a connection that I don't like and won't accept. So I'm myDavid Chats on Linkedin. There's probably only one David Chats, a's sajtz onLinkedin, or you can also hit me up by email at David dot chatsat Value Prim Solutionscom. Excellent, David. I can't thank you enough for thetime today's been great having you on the show. It's been my pleasureagain honored and humbled. Appreciate a chat. Excellent. All right, everyone thatdoes it for this episode. Please check us out of the BEB REVxccom. share the episodes with friends,...

...families, Co workers. Listen toit over the holidays and please make sure you share it out and write USreview on itunes. We use those reviews to help craft the content that weput together for you, so please take the time to do that. Isgreatly appreciated. Until next time we have value prime solutions with you all nothingbut the greatest success. You've been listening to the BB revenue, executive experience. To ensure that you never miss an episode, subscribe to the show andItunes or your favorite podcast player. Thank you so much for listening. Untilnext time,.

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