The B2B Revenue Executive Experience
The B2B Revenue Executive Experience

Episode · 4 years ago

3 Things Sales Executives Need To Hear, But Are Ignoring with David Shatz

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Sales executives face challenging jobs with ever increasing numbers, so it is no wonder it is easy to lose sight of the things which can truly increase revenue performance.

David Shatz shares a powerful story from his 20+ year career and breaks down the three things he feels sales executives need to be hearing but for some reason are ignoring.

www.b2brevexec.com

David Shatz on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/davidshatz/

Chad Sanderson on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/chadsanderson/

Value Prime Solutions: www.valueprimesolutions.com

We're listening to the BTB revenueexecutive experience, a podcast, dedicated elpe executives, train theirsales and marketing teams to optimize growth, whether you're looking fortechniques and strategies were tools and resources. You've come to the rightplace. Let's accelerate your growth in three to one: welcome everyone to the Bto b Revenue Executive Experience, I'm your host chat, Sanderson and todaywe're taking a little bit different tact and then some of the otherepisodes you probably listend to we're going to talk to one of the newestmembers of the value. Prime Solutions. Team, David, shats WHO's, a newmanaging partner with us we're going to talk about his background. Give youguys some insights into what he's bringing to the table for our clientsand for those that are interested working with us and then also dig intoyou know the three things he thinks you revenue executives out. There shouldhear that you're, probably not listening to so David Welcome to theshow thanks tod, I'm honored and and a...

...little humble. I don't know that I'd go that far, but do appreciate you taking the time Het.We all know times the most valuable thing we have, so I do appreciate it.But let's just start with your background, how' D, You get into sales, I can. I can take it pretty far back. Iwould say to when I was in fifth grade and I started selling gum by the piece, so you laugh, but mom would buy me togum. So my cost of good soul was zero hundred percent profit, and I did thatuntil I probably got caught with a huge pocket of loose change by the principal she called hom andsaid Hey. This is probably not a good idea to be selling gun, but meanwhile Ihad the entire fifth grade class lined up. There was three classes and theywere all lined up outside of my classroom. Geving me ten cents, a piecefor Gum, so I got a little little bit of a taste of sales there and reallyprobably two more important incidents in my life, forced me or or kind ofwhere I gravitated toward sales. The...

...second one, I would say would be probably organic chemistry. I would say I wentinto college as premed beading my chest, I'm going to become a doctor and then Imet a a tough gentleman. I like to call Aganin chemistry got a Pein, a DadanChemistry. Dad Look at my transcrit said: I'm notpaying for des might be time to change your major. So I change my major toentrepreneurial studies with they kind of a focus on sales, and I think thethird pipeo mom, which is what really got me into my sales career, was Istarted working at Software Company right out of college in CustomerSupport Great Way to learn a product, and I was making ten bucks an hour.They made that sound like a Lough, but I one thousand nine hundred and ninetyfour pobit still still wasn't a lot so first week, I'm Mr Gun Ho love thejob love talking to customers and I work fifty hours. I look at my paycheckand I got paid for forty, so I went to...

...my boss and I said: Hey hat's, what'sgoing on said, this is a forty hour a week. Job Doesn't matter how often orhow long you work we're going to pay for forty hours and he said want tomake more money o get in TA sales. So, six weeks later, I was a sales rap, avery green sales rap and that ws one thousand nine hundred Ad Ninety Probaby o e Ltousand, nine hundred and inety for o one thousand nine hundred andninety five and I've been in been in sales ever since excellent. So as yougo through your career, what made you decide to kind of you know? I've beentold I've jumped the fence right. I was in marketing first and then I went tothe dark side and went to sales, and now I've gone to the apparently theeven darker sideed sales enablement. What made you make the decision to cometo value prime solutions? Well, I was trained on the value selling framework,probably in literally ninety Oro, two Zand by Rick Maciich, Mr Bankonage, thelegend, the legend and Rick, and I we would talk probablyonce or twice a year, which is pretty rare. I think for a sales trainer andan Attendi Young Antendi, I think I was...

...probably twenty five twenty six at thetime, Rick trained me, but I gravitated towards the framework ive used theframewark really an in every position. I've held since we're train me and Rickcould always take my call. We would always spend more than just thirtyseconds on the phone and I always toyed with hey when I have the experience.I'd love to be the next, although that bar set pretty high. He next wreck is avery high bar, very very high bar hop o. We neverreach that, but the way rick delivered the class. The way ricks took the timeto learn our business, and I was at a company selling to not for profits,which is a very different whatwe thought was a very different sale andrick always had an answer to our questions, and we had some toughquestions for Ri, but he took the time to learn our business and the frameworkthat he brought to the table just seems so simple, Yeh powerful. I know thatsounds like a commercial, but I it's really not when you are out in thefield using it to great success, R,...

...that's! But finally, it just you knowhad a couple of positions where I had some exits and finally, probably backin in two thousand and fifteen, I opened up my own consulting businessand I really wasn't prepared to deliver. The frame war wasn't certified, we'restill talking a rick once or twice a year, and then a couple of months agoit just been like a great fit and T it was time to make the job excellent.Well, we're extremly excited to have you on the team. Thank you so becauseyou mentioned consulting and you've done, you know you've worked withclients, you got a story, a funny story about consulting in your experiencethat that you always go back to or tell it cocktail parties. I can try. I've been told by by my son and my wifethat my humor is my humor and it's not really funny. U It the dad jokes. So my I guess, if I take you back, might bedating myself, but I didn't see this episode live. But if you remember theold, odd couple, Wich ony rat, Oh yeah, and he writes on the board- assume...

Wull, never assume anything, becausewhen you assume something and he's, I think he circles the first threeletters of the war. You make an ass out of you and Ma when you assume somethingyeph. So literally my first meeting, I was a green consultant and I wasmeeting with a friend and I was I was doing two things: its helping getsoftware developed with entrepreneurs getting mobile, apks, developed andOtifi software develop. I just farming them out to a network that I hadestablished of development shops and I was also trying to do sales consulting so I go undo this meaning and I'massuming that I'm going to sell these guys in APP easy sale, friends of mineand we talk for maybe ten minutes their eyes glaze over I'm talking abouttechnology. I am assuming that they need an AP without really doing anyquestions because hey they agree to meet with me about an AP right, they're,Goinna, bi, so simple and after ten minutes they say David,we don't need anaugh all of our technology providers and these guyswere benefits brokers. All of our technology providers provide the thetech we need to give to our customers...

...we're not going to spend x dollars on aAP. However, would you be interested in talking to us about how you might coachOursalves Tem? So I'm not sure that's funny fun, because I felt like an idiot foot,ind mouth thinking, I'm going to sell these guys. You know reall expensive atlike all this commission and it turned into kind of I they turned the tables on meand hired me as a sales consultant. Well I mean it's a lot better turnoutthan it could have been right. I mean any time you walk in with assumptions.It gets really dangerous. Yes, so I've learned not to assume it was a lesson.I know Yous wer something funny as it was more enlightning of maybe askquestions and see what the customer needs before you go in there and beatyour chest like an eight hundrer pound Garilla and assume that you know whatthe prospect needs without asking some some diagnostic questions, yeah it well,and it's I mean hey it's. What keeps us in business right because most salesrefs don't do that, and I'm 'v Always wondered why? Maybe it's fear? Maybeit's just lack of preparation, but that...

...consent hey. I want to talk to yo aboutmy product and my features and my benefits and you haven't even asked aquestion to know if they really give a crap or not yeah, and I think I mayhave heard it on on one of our podcast or someone said it to me recently.There's you know sales people have two types of either speaking or listeningtheyr they like to speak and then in like he way to speak. So this was more of let's just listen,listen to what the problems are and I might have a solution on might mot. Butat least I know what your struggles are, what your challenges or what yourbusiness issues are, and maybe I can solve them actual. It was an eyeopenerfor me. Imagine your board sets a target oftwenty percent revenue growth in eighteen months, so something will haveto change with your sales team. How do you beat your target value? Primesolutions can help, ensure your managers and reps are leveraging asales framework that focuses on value, not price, don't assume you have it allfigured out, don't wait until it's too late visit value, Prime Solutionscomand let them help excellent all right.

So, speaking of listening, what are thethree things that you think revenue executives need to hear today that F,for whatever reason they aren't hearing they're, maybe they're, ignoring orthey're just missing? What would be the first one, I think number one for me,and I've always tried to do this myself. I've always tried to teach this,because I think at the beginning of my career, I'll get to that a second Iheard somebody that I would I said, I'd never want to be. That guy is, I think,and I think this needs to flow downhill from the chief revenue officer,asppclls or whatever it is, but teach your team to be likable and humbled. Nobody wants to buy from somebody thatis not likable. You know, unless you're in a desert and they're selling yourwater oay anthing, I got ut have to be likeable, but I remember my career Iwas, I think I even have a q Ata third of a cube, and I would listen to this.This gentleman who who sell a friend today woil't he many names, but hewould basically say hey. This is so and so from so, and so can you buy my stuffand it wasn't that that bad, but it was,...

I don't want to be that guy who doesn'tcare about how you're doing on the other end of the line doesn't want todevelop a relationship, and it's not very likable, and certainly not humble.So that's number one for me. I think if raps are likable and humble it's easierto develop, that foundational relationship and Ho you'll get a chanceto talk about your solutions, but if they're not likable and not humbleyou're, fighting an uphilled out yea, that's a tough challenge as a toughchallenge for revenue, exactly especially with teams tat scale right,but it is critical without a out I would agreed number two is: I think you have tocreate a great culture, the days of the boiler room, atmosphere of pounding,the phones and looking at specific metrics, without having a great placeto work without recognizing certain things. That might not be. You know ahuge enterprice sale, but if you have that culture and people want to come towork, I remember one of my early positions. I saw a guy that wouldn'ttake the elevator and he said I'm so...

...excited to come to work. I run up threefights of stairs to get to my desk and that's that's always something I strivefor in the positions I've taken of it's a great culture, not just becauseyou're making a lot of money, selling a lot of stuff and getting commissions,but you love coming to work. It's almost like that that two beer testI'll have one beer with anybody, but the people I want to I want to workwith, are passionate about what we're doing, and I want to have that. Second,third, beer, maybe tha, maybe that fourth and fifth yeer exactly all right. So what's the third third thing, I think, is reallyimportant, is redefining what a win is, especially as a rap a sales rap getsrolling in their career. It might take you, depending on yoursale cycle, three four five months to close a deal or maybe an enterprise.It's a two year sellcycle. You have to redefine the win, and sometimes thewind isn'nclosing that deal, but it's building a pipeline to a certain number,a certain number of deals or a certain number of millions of dollars orwhatever that the metric might be might...

...be having a great phone call. It mightbe having the ability to schedule a meeting or several meetings. I might begetting the next meeting, but if reben executives want to build great teams, Ireally think they have to redefine that win and let their selves rups Walk Outof the office whatever time they're leaving after a full day and say youknow what I want today. I might not a close the deal, but I'm getting closerto closing that deal. Yeah that celebrate the little wins right,because I mean look, sales is not easy, mean o Wou live on rejection. I meanthat's essentially what you get day and an day out. So if you, especially ifthings get more complex, if you can't help them celebrate the little winds,it's going to be a huge challenge. YEA, a lot of it's coaching right, makingsure that that that prevailing attitude flows downhill from the top and at theend of the day we all have a number to report to whether it's o the street orto our boss, but sometimes you have to y think you're more likely to besuccessful when you have a positive ADDICTU. I know that sounds a littlecorny, but we all know that when we're...

...under the rest, when we're under stressand we haven't had a closed deal in a long time, we sound desperate on thephone yeah right. But if I'm getting recognition from my manager or my VPFsales or my CEO, that says hey, I know you didn't close that deal yet butyou're on your way. How can I help? Let's redefine the win right? U Gethuge excellent, excellent three grade points. I really appreciate that ifpeople that are listening to the podcast want to reach out talk to youmore whatit's, the best way to get a hold of you, you can always connect with me onlinked in IV. Rarely read a realely met, a connection that I don't like andwon't accept so o'n, my David Chats on Linkedan, there's, probably only oneDavid, chats at's Shatz on Linkdin, or you can also hit me up by email atDavid Dot shats at value, Prime Solutionscom, excellent David. I can'tthink you enough for the time today's been great having you on the show, it'sBin, my pleasure again, honored and humbled appreciat, a chat actuallentall right, everyone that does it for this episode. Please check us out of heBTB revizeccom shore, the episodes with...

...friends, families coworkers, listen toit over the holidays and please make sure you share it out and Britus reviewon itunes. We use those reviews to help craft the content that we put togetherfor you so please take the time to do that is is greatly appreciated untilnext time we have value. Prime Solutions Wish you all nothing, but thegreatest success you've been listening to the BTBrevenue executive experience to ensure that you never miss an episodesubscribe to the show in Itunes for your favorite podcast player. Thank youso much for listening until next time.

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