The B2B Revenue Executive Experience
The B2B Revenue Executive Experience

Episode · 5 months ago

The Sales Trainer’s Happy Hour: Virtual Selling w/ Lisa Schnare

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

You’ve been inundated with more excuses than usual from your newest reps lately, which isn’t good on the best of days, but knowing the next batch will come on a Zoom call with 18 guests… Yeah, your latent migraine is already planning a party for its prophesied return. You’ve heard every old canard imaginable — but the last 18 months brought a new one: I can’t sell virtually.

What if I told you your rep is looking at virtual meetings all wrong? What if I said you are, too?

This week is the second time Lisa Schnare, Natalie Pitchford, and Carlos Nouchejoin me for drinks in our new, not-safe-for-work sales series and this time it’s personal… virtually.

In this episode, we discuss how to adapt to in this new virtual world, including:

How to stay personal, virtually

How leadership can overcome the challenges of distractions from a distance

Common reasons for video reluctance and how to overcome them

Now that you know how to navigate the new world of virtual selling, are you ready to optimize your tech stack or dive into how Google’s new rules impact your SEO? Check out the full list of episodes: The B2B Revenue Executive Experience.

You're listening to the BDB revenue executive experience, a podcast dedicated to helping executives train their sales and marketing teams to optimize growth. Whether you're looking for techniques and strategies or tools and resources, you've come to the right place. Let's accelerate your growth in three, two, one. Welcome everyone to the BDB revenue executive experience. I'm your host, Chad Sanderson, and we are once again trying and experiment. So full warning for everybody. This is a not safe for work episode, so if you're not listening to it on headphones, highly recommend you put on headphones or listened up for you go to bed. There's alcohol involved. Cheers everyone. It's great to see my cohost with me today. We Got Lisa Snar, Carlos and new Cha and Natalie Pitchford with us. We're just going to riff for a little while, we're gonna pick a topic and we're just gonna go hopefully it's entertaining and educational. I'm not even sure at this point if we're concerned it's educational, but bill at least is educating. So for that we're going to pick about talking about virtual call management. Today, everybody's in virtual everybody's struggling. We still see people struggling with it. How do I connect to another human being? How do I manage the space? Things like that. And since it was Natalie's topic, I'm going to kick it to her first and let her set stage. Why is this so important today? Noaiy, sad. You know, it's there's something I'm hearing every day. I mean, we felt by now that we'd be in a different place of the pandemic, but we're not. We are where we are and all across the globe were in different levels. But one thing is so happening is a lot of ourselves into still calling virtually, and you know, it's been a struggle for some, for those who typically have love going out and having those drinks or having those conversations in the parking lot are on the wad of the elevator. That's changed. That dynamic is there anymore and I do see a lot of struggles with okay, how do I maintain that momentum virtually? How do I keep those relationships going? How do I even establish new relationships virtually? And you know, I think, if anything, that this year and a half of taught us. is so important to keep that human element and it's so important to maintain those relationships, even though we can't physically beat a bite together. And one of the things that I've heard so often as well. I don't think I can be me virtually. You know, I it's different. It's not how do I be me? And and it's I can see it's a real, real struggle right, and I think there's absolutely I was watching my eleven year old daughter, you know, she had her high school, she's going in a high school and she's got orientation virtually, which you know, think of going in a high school and having do this virtual right, and I saw her in front of her and in front of the camera and I realized how tense she was. I and I realize that a lot of us feel that way sometimes. We feel that when we're in front of the camp were we're not allowed to be up, and I think that's probably the most important thing that we need to take away from that. Is, to you, it's you're having a conversation. ...

Yes, the medium is different, we're not right next to each other, but how do you, you know, still be you be authentic, ask the questions engage and they it was such an eyeopener watching her, but it was also respective of how we feel a stales in that we're just not truly being authentic as it like to be in front of a camera. I could I couldn't agree more. The thing that has in surprised me actually, as we've done more and more of this virtual engagement, is how annoying virtual backgrounds are. Not only there's a whole bunch of you know, psychology and neuroscience around it, flattening the image and us not being able to see facial expressions and things like that, but I kind of get to the point where I want to know the person I'm talking to. You know, I don't. I know Carlos and I don't do our hair before we get on virtual it's okay if other people don't. Well, we want to see what's going on in the background. It helps US connect better to human beings, but it does require us to apply a different skill set in terms of managing that, especially when we talked about earlier that credibility introw but that connection to a human being. I'm curiously from your perspective, what's the biggest challenge you see getting the way of people are actually getting comfortable with this new approach to sales. Well, I think we all think we have to get it perfect every time, and that's why people rely on the virtual backgrounds. Is because we don't want to show the unfolded laundry or whatever. Like I'm fortunate enough to have an office where, we'll guess what, I have a messy bookshelf there. It is like with with necklaces and stuff on top. So, like when I'm on calls, this is this is kind of like a narrow video, but I don't hide it. I think you know an end. I have a geriatric cat that you could hear in the background. He's not howling right now, but he might at any moment, and sometimes I let people believe it's a child because it's easier to explain than a geriatric cat that likes to how at the top of his lungs. But I think this level of humanity has just leveled us all again. Like worldwide. I work with clients all over the world. We all do. We do like it's the first conversation that you have now is how are you doing? How are things going? And you genuinely mean it, because we're all in the same situation and we're all it's changing so quickly. We start to think things are getting better, then they get worse, then things come up. You know, we don't even have to talk about it because we're living it. But I think that levels us to a point that we haven't been in sales and very long time. We used to rely on certain tactics to connect with people, and now it's just like, you know what, we have this one common subject to talk about with anybody anywhere in the world, and it's positioned us to talk about like the individual and they're like, how they're affected by things first, and I think that's connecting us back to the humanity and sales in a way that we haven't seen in a long time. And I think, honestly, right before this pandemic, if anyone can remember two thousand and nineteen,...

...which feels like ten years ago, we were talking about how a lot of sales rolls were going to be automated, we're going to be robotic, that how it's going to go away. And now, more than ever, I think we've realized, you know what, you can only connect to people on a human level if you really truly understand what they're going through in that moment. And the virtual selling environment has been imposed on industries that have never had to do it before. So they're getting dragged into the twenty one century kicking and screaming in order to keep their businesses going, and I feel like, I don't know, I actually would throw this to the group. I feel like there was a moment, of course, where we all went, Holy Crap, how are we going to keep going and into especially industries that rely on in person who had never done remote work before. Let's put that out there too. Is like, you know, it's not just remote selling, its remote work. Who had never had a remote workforce are just like trying to figure out how to stay alive during these times and are realizing, oh my God, this whole time we could have kept this business going, and maybe in some cases it was more painful than other us, but we've realized that things can be digital first. But how do you guys thinks, like, how do you folks think that the attitude has changed since, like do you think? Do you feel like it's temporary, because I feel like it's a shift, but I don't know, Carlos, you got you keep doing that of your face. Man, you're gonna have to worry. You have you some both doing the bobbing, like I'm getting seasick and I'm trying to think you're yeah, I'm not saying normally am. I'm going to go I'M gonna go back to top big and say, Hey, I think for some folks selling virtually as hard, and I'm going to try to be sensitive Carlos for a second, and I mean not because they're in tough environments or they're dealing with buyers it don't normally buy virtually. I dealt with and this is globally. I told I was doing some coaching and you know, I like this client because I did one on one coaching for a young professional, which I normally would not do. It my time, covid hit. He was living in a tiny up apartment in Madrid. I remember talking to him and it's like, you know, I feel like I'm just he's talking to me over his bed into this little bedroom. mean it was tiny. We talked about he was allowed to leave his room once a day to go grocery shop and exercising he had to do in the building. He had to go up and down on stairs. So you know, the joke was I'm thinking about grabbing the neighbor's pet so I can go outside walk the pat because it doesn't you know, you don't get fine for that. So, folks, look on one hand, I want to be sensitive that people have been forced to do virtual that we're not prepared, that are in environments that are not ideal,...

...dealing with customers and buyers that are not used to buying virtually now, that being said, for the rest of us, come on, stop using it as an EFN excuse. The W the spinning and people are making money and you're sitting on the sidelines going, but I can't touch them. Take about the lunch. It's what I would normally say to that. Hey, come on, the world is spinning. Is it harder? Yeah, in some ways it is, if you're specially, if you're not used to it. Is it pot? Oh, I love that. What's impossible? Okay, again, I do want to be sensitive. In certain industries, in certain markets, maybe it's nearly impossible because they just don't buy and connect with human being that way. But I think that is this versus this. So, for the those you're in this group, I'm sorry you're screwed. It's tough for you even have to find a way to survive. For those that are in this bucket, what are you doing? Get off the freaking couch, put up a little green curtain, find a corner clearer out of closet. For God's sake, try to make a little environment where you can actually you know, put prop up your laptop, find some backup cameras you can buy off Amazon and create your little world. To cannetwood. folts, stop using it as an excuse. The world is going to change, just like it's changed before. It'll change again, but I don't think it'll change to be exactly what you all expect, because it's always changing. Right. So, in this world, a virtual and only great topic, I think we all need to find a way that, you know, be successful in the situation that we have. Find your way to get there. Get over your fear of engagement. I do you sleep better standing up than sitting down. So, yes, it's a long day, folks. Are you see me sitting down? I'm sorry, but you know what, you gotta do what you can and environment you got so with you're standing up, sitting down, lighting behind you, find a way to make the environment work. I've changed my office three times over. I don't think people need an office anywhere in their home. They need a studio. Okay, you need to find your little spot, because is you're going to want to be on video. And, folks, think is a flip side. If you get the other person to share of the video, you can see there in Prett expressions. You can see you they're actually even paying attention. I have a cro I work with that, I think, takes all calls like this. Yeah, Uh Huh, I get it now that ADM on video. You can actually see it. Before he was just lying to you. So, folks, there's a lot of advantages to this video. Think about all the time, you...

...say, traveling to the office, hopping on a plane. Right, it's embrace it a little bit because I think for a segments of the market it's here to say you got to make this medium work for you, and if an ugly face like this can do it, you guys can do it. That's what I got to say. Well, there's an important point in there, right. There's the the authenticity, which is a common topic that we're seeing today for the first time in a long time, I don't want to say ever, but in a long time. We have a shared global experience. It is a huge shift that everybody's addressing trying to deal with. I mean, I know, I'll be honest. This is actually came up what I was talking to Julie R CEO earlier today. I remember back in March of two thousand and nineteen when all of this code stuff hit, and I there was a good two weeks where I would shitting myself because I didn't know what would happen to the business. We were so used to doing over ninety percent out of our work in person and now we have to take what little we were doing in virtual and migrated to be world class. And I wasn't a hundred percent sure of the business because of survive, and then to actually facilitate virtuals and completely different animal. But we made it fun. I mean Carlos and I got into this weird ass competition, I'm still not sure how we did it, about who was going to set up the best studio right, who's going to have the best lightning, because we both have the same challenges. If the lights in the wrong place, then the head is shiny and that's distracting. And what's behind US right? What's going on behind us? And how? How are you going to be able to have the best audio quality? How are you able to engage? What do you have to do to translate the human through the digital in terms of the camera? The big aspect I see, I think I still see the fear in the sales teams with not understanding how to prep effectively to manage the virtual environment, because if you are prepping for a call and virtual, there is more upfront prep, I believe, more upfront prep and expectation management. That has to happen through other communication forms in order to make this as effective as it was before. And I'm curiously so Ornatalie, I'll just throw it out. What have you seen in terms of either reps trying to figure out what is going to be most effective, or teams or leadership even helping educate them on how to master virtual interaction? Yeah, so I'm going God that a US do it first off their chat. So I see what's been happening is that seems more and more teams have been really struggling with this and in terms of equipping the leadership in particular, are struggling with how they equip their teams with a right set of expectations for virtual meetings and what advoices more and more over the last year and a half is really trying to drive the skill set to say you must be more prepared and this is what preparation looks like. Preparation looks like stending in a gender ahead of time, you know, really setting the expectations ahead of ten, you know, cameras on, we want to see you, we're going to be thirty minutes and and that sit and keeping to that...

...time. And it's so important that we set those expectations ahead of time because then you know, the audience comes prepared. You're prepared and really holding the participants to that. You know, if I'm on a call and I see eyes down and I see people, you know, checking messages and all of that, that's disrespectful of my time, you know, and it's it's how do you call that out, because that's that's thirty minutes I've invested, or forty five minutes have invested a fund to you. Don't be afraid to call another time? If this is something that you know you know we can have get your attention right now. Let's Git it another time. And some folks are afraid of doing that something. Folks are actually afraid of calling it out. But you have to, I think, if we're going to really develop the respect that this time, for this virtual meeting, is worth everyone's participation. Lisa, s nearly, just just sorry. Just something you said there that it just resonated. We've had people looking down at their phones and not paying attention when we're there in person. We've all seen it. Yeah, there and we had to learn presentation skills like standing behind them, calling on them to get them to engage and break a habit. And it is the same thing in this virtual environment. You gotta find your confidence and your techniques to get them to engage, and I just wanted to bring that up because even when you think you're prepared to go virtual, the other person the other end might not be. And Hey, if they're, you know they're just looking sideways, are looking at their side screen, that's one thing, but if they're looking down their phone not paying attention, hey, build your confidence and techniques, call on a match ad what do you think? Does that resonate with you right you know, feel free to try to get them to engage without just calling them out going hey, you're looking at your phone and it's the same skills we would have if we were in person. It's just a different medium. Sorry, there's a cat know there's a there's a confidence aspect there, though, that I think, that I think is important. There's a confidence, not a just controlling a room but controlling an interaction. And I'll be the first admit if you put me in a room full of people and I have all the tricks and tactics down for controlling that room and calling people out. It's easier, I think, for people able to hide when we're in person because of the depth, like they're in the back corner or whatever the hell wherever they're sticking their head. I had one at one kid who is actually playing sports bets during a meeting, which I caught, you know, but that was in person. In virtual I can see everybody's face. You're all equally distant from me and if I have the ability to scan and I have the confidence to say, ask that question, because I can't physically stand behind them, I'll ask them that question to snap them back. It's the same type of control as we're executing the meeting. The piece that I think is so critical that is being missed is that prep is that send the emailed Nat Lee's point with the agenda, but also, I'm going to say, the meetings twenty five minutes and the last five minutes. I...

...need my power person, my decision maker, my influencer, to stick around so I can have a much more authentic and connected one on one interaction with that person ask them questions that I wouldn't ask them in a group setting. Or maybe I'm bullshit. At least I don't know. What do you think I mean? I'm obviously bullshit. But besides, well, yeah, yeah, as everyone can tell. But no, I actually like as much as I preach it and I don't practice it, I actually do wish I had a fifteen minute buffer between every meeting because I do feel like every time we start to get to the meet with clients, it's at the end of the call and then it's you know, you go over because you're finally in that place where we've warmed up, when we've gotten to the heart of the issue. So if we could actually plan for that, and I'm I'm working on it. I don't know if you're working on it, but like that last few minutes seems to be really important and I do feel like so, I don't know, my background has always been an inside sales. I very rarely met my clients facetoface and to this day have only sold mostly inside sales. So I'm coming from a perspective where virtual is my life for the last thirteen years. So I do feel like I'm coming at this from a place of like not really understanding why you can't close deals online. But I do want to be sympathetic to industries that always relied on that trade show experience, that odd that hands on experience. I've been trade shows during that time as well and I understand the rapport building that happens in those moments. But I've also built rapport with a lot of people over this medium, the way we're doing today, and I will just point out for listeners chat is the only one on the s call I've met in person, and Carlos real also very trusted business partners of mine. So and and that met my clients face toofay. Series trying to up was that thing first season. Hey, I've never met people facetoface, screw this series. Like, I'm sorry, I don't understand that. You've never met people facetoface. That's what she just said. Oh my God. But, like, I never stands my whole career. So, except for like, as I said, I think in a previous podcast, I did start my career in enterprise run a car with people screaming in my face, I don't really actually feel like that was a sales role. That was more of a customer service role because I had to like put it a lot of fires. But I do think that we fall back on a lot of habits that we had in the past that don't actually matter anymore. If you can come across an educated, trusted, credible way, you're going...

...to build trust with clients that is going to span years of engagement that you wouldn't have ever expected. I think that's an important point. Like there are some of us, some industries that were used to it. In fact, I mean in the four years that I've been part of ice, saying associates, there's only one account, actually two accounts, that I've been too physically to sell to. One I went with Carlos actually got on a plane. The other was just because it was here in Denver. The rest of it I've sold virtually. So for me the shift in terms of virtual meeting management was not huge. But for other industries, how do you replicate that raw authenticity of you're at a trade show during the day and then you go to dinner at night and then at the next day you're hungover at the same trade show and you're all having that hungover experience? I mean, I'm not pushing that stuff, but let's just be real. That's typically in my experience over the last twenty years. Typically what happens. You have a shared experience. So is there a way to pivot and because we've all had this shared experience in covid the fear of the uncertainty? Some people believe, some don't. We've lost some people have lost people, some people haven't. It is a shared shift. Is there a way perhaps in virtual to harness that, to create the opportunity to connect at the same level you would if you were sitting across the table at a bar with somebody? I mean we're trying to do it now. It drinks and hanging out on virtual we're you know, I'll say it again Lisa's in Canada, Carlos is outside the US and Georgia, and Natalie's in Jamaica. I mean we're all over the place. So how do you replicate how do you coach your team's to be able to be comfortable in that environment? Any thoughts on that one? So, chat, on the part about being hungover, I just can't relate. Thanks your question. You know, let's I'm not the smartest person. I'm not the sharpest tool in the shed. You can use all the analogies, but even just us on our call. Yeah, Lisa, you know I've met more recently Natalie. I've known for a while. Actually, I've known N and longer than any of you, but I mean just recently in engaging with her uncertain opportunities and working with her, I've gone to know her better. Right chat, unfortunately, has met me in person and virtually, probably more than you ever wanted to. And a Lisa, you and I met virtually and really engage on certain opportunities. But I think it takes effort for young managers out there that you're trying to connect and the employee create those one on one opportunities to just get them to have a conversation and then when you're in group settings it's easier to call on individuals to engage because you've met him, you've kind of heard a little bit about their backgrounds or families or likes or dislikes, their desires. Right, but you gotta it's effort. And now we're talking about communication. I think going virtual you literally have to overcommunicate. You know, one of our partner's, David, taught me a new trick, and I...

...mean he's Canadians. Who knew you can learn stuff from Canada? He taught he said, Hey, look, instead of reviewing these slides on in front of them tomorrow, why don't we send it to him on Friday and then we could say hey, we provided it for him and then we'll just kind of get see if they have questions. It may make the virtual session even more effective. And he was right. Who knew and and I just keep saying I've say this others and I keep arring every day, over communicate. In this world of Covid we're all mohammered by a million emails and conversations, but we're trapped at home. So fine ways over communicate and honestly, in the meeting we had, the majority of folks did not read this beautiful email that David had written. Yeah, but because we went through the effort of doing so, guess what? They leaned in a little closer to listen to the slides. Now. Yeah, they said, Hey, hold on a second, let me just read this last one. And they were willing to put the extra effort to make sure that the message is well communicated. So again, I'm all over to place. It's a good thing I'm not hungover, but it's really I mean, I think in virtual you got to find multiple ways that communicate, because I don't think. I think it folks that I find is say, is everybody's overworked. Yeah, I mean I'm for the folks that are working and my dad spent this whole life in hospitality. So, believe me, I understand segments of the business, but there's other segments of business that all we've done is work, we've got no place to go and we're, as a lot of folks are, just overworked. So over communicate the message, do it in fun, interesting ways and then make your virtual while experiencing another fun experience to kind of pull people together, let people be themselves. That's my that's an important piece right there. So there's this balance, right. This is balance depending on the size of the organization. I have a corporate identity, of corporate brand. If I'm a global organization, I have regional sensitivities. I have to be aware of somebody somewhere. Of course it's going to send us an email say I just doesn't work in his Beekistan, or it doesn't work in France or it doesn't work in German. Bullshit. Everybody's human at the end of the day. What we're talking about is how do you connect to you being? We're talking about executing out of a place of respect for ourselves, because we did the prep and, more importantly, the respect for the people that we're talking to. The virtual environment is honestly, I think it's an opportunity. It's an opportunity to optimize the Roi for every minute spent in terms of engagement. I mean, I know in my own business over the last eighteen months I've done the math. It's not complicated maths when I wanted to be to get out of their skin about it. That figures out that the time I spent on a plane is it's lost opportunity. I can't engage with someone except the person next me,...

...who ninety eight percent of times not going to be a lead or somebody that's could be able to advance my personal financial goals and to recover from divorces and actually hit retirement. But at the end of the day, those are interactions. there. What did Fight Club call it? What they call them? So single serving friends. Anybody Remember Fight Club? Single serving friends? That that's what we're talking about on a plane. That's probably before least this time. Shit, I just felt old. All right. So, anyway, at the end of the day, what we're talking about is how do you manage it, and I think Natalie hit on it. It's the prep. I think we have to as leaders, help our teams understand that the preparation and expectation management is just as critical now. It was critical before, but nobody did it, or they wouldn't do it and complain about it. Now it's it's vital for us to be able to connect to other human beings and I'm curious to see with the clients that you all are working with. Why, why do we still not get it? Why do we still have our sales reps selling from the shadows. Now, granted, I've got studio lights in here, as most of you do, and least it just all of a sudden got studious with her glasses. But yet studio lights in here for lighting and you still have sales reps that are selling from the shadows or they're looking down at the camera, like some very obvious things. Why isn't leadership really helping them attempt to optimize the humanity of their own presentation? Carl Carlos looks like old mother Hubbard Anyway. Yeah, you know, set that's such a great point chat. And you know, I worked with a team recently, a couple months ago, and and this team culturally their business depended on just being in person and they really struggle with making this transition and I asked why. You know, what are some of the things? Some of it was just being so selfconscious. There were so selfconscious, like least mention of being at home, of having kids in the background, of having spouses walking behind, of having stuff going on and and I think they got so wound up that they needed to have the perfect studio. Now we know not everyone can have the perfect studio and at some point we just got to realize that you know how far more of the world are in the same shoes that we are, and just just beak human. Yes, you don't want to have dirty laun during the background. So they're basic things that you do need to do and we do need to set some ground rolls and some some best practices. But at the end of the day, you know what, we're used to seeing someone passed by in the background. We used to hearing that the kids home and doing school. You know, we just need to get over that and and and it's a hump that I think some people struggle with because they're just so selfconscious of Oh my gosh, what are they going to think? Right, what are they going to think? And we just need to realize that we're all in very similar boats and we just need to move beyond that. I think you know, absolutely all right, so to be respectful everybody's time. Thirty seconds each. One of your biggest takeaway you want...

...people have when it comes to virtual meetings, Natalie, was your topics? I'm going to start with you, you know, just just me you. It's you know, you're talking to people just like yes, you're doing it in front of a camera and it's not going to say and is being in front of someone, but at the end of the day, you're having an interaction. See You, and I think people truly, more than every now in this environment, they want to have those conversations that I want to feel like they're talking to someone who's genuinely interested and who's being authentic. So my fake is to you. All Right, Carlos Ere sorry, that's sorry, Amazon delivery. Now I'm going to Carlos next. Sorry, I had an Amazon delivery. Thirty sence. Be Prepared and there would you don't last time? Well, netally just said, hey, you don't have to have the perfect studio. She's right. I mean we've investl some money, effort, Amazon, we've invested. Stuff is and let's be real, around the globe not everybody's going to be you or has the ability to do it, not even financially. They just don't live in a situation where they can. So Hey, be prepared, find your environment, make it work for you. Realize it, and you know, Netie, I'm stealing yours. People are human beings. Be a human being and present that. If you know, people will buy you before they buy the product. Think about any product you ever bought. You bought that sales person in the feeling that they gave you more than you actually bought the product at the end of the day. In fact, we probably paid a premium for that, right, the feeling that someone's got our back, someone's going to be, you know, be there for us. Right. So you are a differentiator for your company. Be You make it work for you. I love it, Liza. Thirty seconds. Oh, you're immute, Lisa. This is the technology working against us. I don't know why. No, no, that was my fault because the geriatric cat was going off to back. Maybe it was, but no, no, to that point, like we're virtual selling, so we have to connect again, like on a human level. I think everything Natalie and Carlos just said is very relevant, but also, like don't overthink it, you know, just be, just be. We're all just being in the space right now. Like I have sweatpants on over like on them card again, and tank top, you know, like you mean, I didn't why you, because, honestly, come on, or like maybe have a glasses on, because I feel like my makeups failing. So guess what, just be and be comfortable and talk to people, because, guess what, we're all people, and I learned that a long time ago, well before this pandemic, when I was traveling through Europe and people helped me, regardless of...

...language, culture, where I was from, whatever. I was not one of those people who walked around with a Canadian flag on my backpack. They had no idea, whereas from I learned a long time ago that we are all just human and we're all just trying to get through this together, and I feel that is more prevalent than ever. And if you can just take a little faith and take comfort in the fact that we're all in this together, understand each other and be human, I think we're all going to prevail. Wow, that was right for me, the young Zen moment. That's en moment from how facts brought to you. It's a lot of Oddka lecious there fla drinks, as your vodka, Rozi by vodka. All right, everyone, I want to thank you for your time. It's been an absolute blasted doing this with y'all. For the audience, you know the drill Lewis Review tell us is this is even worth the shit? We don't even know what we're doing. We're just trying to give you some real insight into what former sales executives would be thinking and doing, and the insights were learning is with the customers that we work with. So hit Itunes, leave us a review, send us an email, follow the youtube channel, whatever you got to do. Until the next time, we all wish you nothing but the greatest selling success. You've been listening to the BB revenue executive experience. To ensure that you never miss an episode, subscribe to the show in Itunes or your favorite podcast player. Thank you so much for listening. Until next time.

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